Definition of you can't win them all (or win some, lose some) in English:

you can't win them all (or win some, lose some)

phrase

informal
  • Said to express consolation or resignation after failure in a contest.

    • ‘You have to be on the edge and I guess you can't win them all.’
    • ‘That one came back to bite the Bucs, of course, when they had their historic breakdown in the fourth quarter last Monday, but like Smith said, you can't win them all.’
    • ‘You expect to win some, lose some, but you don't expect to lose some, lose some and then lose some more.’
    • ‘He added: ‘It's a win some, lose some situation.’’
    • ‘Oh well, I suppose that you can't win them all, and the fact that this movie exists is definitely proof of that.’
    • ‘It was a case of win some, lose some last weekend, as Sligo teams aimed for the play-offs in Division Three of the National Hurling League and Division Three of the Ladies Gaelic football National League.’
    • ‘We treat people with respect and dignity, but you can't win them all.’
    • ‘If he wins the euro referendum, it will be a huge boost to the new administration; if he loses, well, you can't win them all, and there will be four years to get over it.’
    • ‘Well, I guess you can't win them all, you know?’
    • ‘I've probably had better performances in Grand Slam finals but you can't win them all.’