Definition of xanthan gum in English:

xanthan gum

Pronunciation: /ˈzanTHən//-ˌTHan/

noun

Chemistry
  • A substance produced by bacterial fermentation or synthetically and used in foods as a gelling agent and thickener. It is a polysaccharide composed of glucose, mannose, and glucuronic acid.

    • ‘The taste and texture are distinctive, but the ingredients are simple: pulverized sugar, corn syrup, corn starch, xanthan gum, color, and flavor.’
    • ‘In cream cheese, xanthan gum interacts synergistically with guar and locust bean gum, notes Sebree.’
    • ‘Hydrocolloids such as xanthan gum, guar gum, propylene glycol algenate and gum arabic can stabilize these beverages by enhancing viscosity, says Loesel.’
    • ‘Glycerin and xanthan gum maintain the scalp's moisture, which prevents dandruff.’
    • ‘Salad dressings, instant soups, chocolate sauces, ice cream, cake mixes, yogurt, and squeezable chewing gum are just a few of the food products that make use of xanthan gum.’

Origin

1960s: from the modern Latin name of the bacterium Xanthomonas campestris + -an.

Pronunciation:

xanthan gum

/ˈzanTHən//-ˌTHan/