Definition of worth in English:

worth

adjective

  • 1predicative Equivalent in value to the sum or item specified.

    ‘jewelry worth $450 was taken’
    • ‘Mr Walker said his company had sold property worth £3.5 million in the city centre in the past year.’
    • ‘The full course of medicines worth Rs.4,000 is given absolutely free to the patient, said Dr. Leela.’
    • ‘I have not had the antiques valued for years but the collection is worth hundreds of thousands of pounds.’
    • ‘They went to a very reputable firm who said that my property is worth $470 million.’
    • ‘If you take out all the interest as income for 10 years, at the start of the decade your income would be worth £4,000 a year.’
    • ‘Then, one barrel of oil was worth the equivalent of $80 in today's terms.’
    • ‘Now the factory produces up to 7,000 tiles a month, worth around Rp 20 million.’
    • ‘The shares, worth eight times their float value, make him rich enough never to have to work again.’
    • ‘No, it's all about convincing people that what you have to sell is worth the value.’
    • ‘The winner will also qualify for a national draw to win holiday vouchers worth £500.’
    • ‘Last year, Ireland exported goods worth €21,824 for every man, woman and child in the country.’
    • ‘Last year, a manuscript of Shadowmancer alone was valued by one collector as being worth £100,000.’
    • ‘The three-year deal is reputed to be worth in the region of €3 million.’
    • ‘Each authority will end up with separate contracts and their total value will be worth more than £100m a year.’
    • ‘However, the modern Dutch cow creamer is worth one-tenth the value of an 18th century English one.’
    • ‘The on-the-spot fines will apply to shoplifters caught stealing goods worth up to £200.’
    • ‘The deals, worth a combined value of £5 million, will see the Bradford business work on a variety of projects for the firm.’
    • ‘Thailand is a major food exporter and ships out products worth about 270 billion baht annually.’
    • ‘Harris is believed to have signed a three-year deal worth £200,000 a year.’
    • ‘Reliance Industries Ltd will export petrochemicals worth $700 million to China this year.’
    1. 1.1 Sufficiently good, important, or interesting to justify a specified action; deserving to be treated or regarded in the way specified.
      ‘the museums in the district are well worth a visit’
      • ‘Last year he spent time at an Italian village, photographing buildings and people, just because someone had mentioned it was worth a visit.’
      • ‘Any element of the taught course which the student finds interesting is worth exploring.’
      • ‘Generally I think that people who are into sci-fi are interesting and worth listening to.’
      • ‘There was a extensive break between servings, but the second course was certainly worth the wait.’
      • ‘Thus, a good therapist who knows how to treat depression well is worth seeing.’
      • ‘New Delhi's monuments are worth a brief visit, but they can't compete with the red boldness of historic Old Delhi.’
      • ‘Ruth and I discovered some interesting things worth trying once our daylight hours start expanding again.’
      • ‘If you are interested in military history the Royal Armouries Museum is worth a visit and if you fancy a trip out of town, Castle Howard is within easy reach.’
      • ‘An ancient Jain Temple and a temple of Har-Gauri are important spots worth seeing.’
      • ‘They only wanted one segment from New Zealand and had chosen me as the only character here interesting enough to be worth filming.’
      • ‘The winners and runners up photos are on display in Mulligans Pharmacy, Ballybricken, and are really worth a visit.’
      • ‘She remains convinced that values such as kindness and fairness are worth defending.’
      • ‘Their websites in themselves are quite interesting and worth a visit.’
      • ‘It is worth noting how important Darwin's analysis was to the understanding of flowering plants.’
      • ‘This medieval market town, now an affluent commuter adjunct to Newcastle, is worth a visit, if only to see the striking Hexham Abbey.’
      • ‘I think culture and the media is important; and is worth talking about and debating.’
      • ‘His views on charity are also interesting and certainly worth a read.’
      • ‘All of Norm Geras's posts are worth reading, of course, but don't miss this one.’
      • ‘The Town Hall is worth a visit and one of the earliest examples of the typical building style of Bruges, which has become so famous.’
      • ‘I think he was unaware of physical discomfort, or regarded it as not worth bothering about.’
      • ‘I have always regarded this newspaper as an important service and worth my money every semester.’
    2. 1.2 Used to suggest that the specified course of action may be advisable.
      ‘a meat and potato dish that's worth checking out’
      • ‘Is it worth setting up an elaborate structure without knowing the commercial value of its intended output?’
      • ‘Again, we contacted only a comparatively small sample of hairdressers, so it may be worth checking a few yourself.’
      • ‘As the banks vary these extras from one year to the next, it is worth checking that cover is in place for driving on the continent.’
      • ‘It may not be a disease, but it might be worth getting checked out by a doctor if it does not go away soon.’
      • ‘Of course, it is worth asking whether a cut in Superfund money would be so bad.’
      • ‘Also, if there is a new company opening up in the city then it's always worth checking them out in case they are good for a donation.’
      • ‘If you do, and you find this account worth publishing, then please edit and let me know what you have done.’
      • ‘Is it worth paying thousands of pounds for a small triangle of land?’
      • ‘A group spokesman said many of the 90 trees were rare and worth protecting but that a council officer had suggested rarity was not a concern.’
      • ‘Still, there are some courses that are worth playing regularly and this is one of them.’
      • ‘These treats could be worth franchising, but a Markt will probably not be opening at a mall near you anytime soon.’
      • ‘Purple Heron is a regular overshooting migrant to Britain and it is always worth checking any heron you see fly from a reed bed.’
      • ‘It'll be worth checking the weather forecast first, of course, just in case it's wall-to-wall cloud.’
      • ‘Most estate agents acknowledge a risk factor, but many suggest it is worth taking.’
      • ‘But, it might just be worth opening an account to trade in these last couple of weeks.’
      • ‘So, if you've got an old or unreliable boiler, it might be worth getting it checked right now.’
      • ‘The number of people attending means it's worth dolling up the venue and using the best sound system.’
      • ‘It's worth comparing the status of motorists to that of smokers.’
      • ‘This is a book you can trust, although it is always worth double checking the advice about chemicals, which can become outdated very quickly.’
      • ‘The function of the conference is to draw attention to the fact that this unique course is worth saving.’
    3. 1.3 Having income or property amounting to a specified sum.
      ‘she is worth $10 million’
      • ‘Which is another controversial subject, how can a simple player be worth so much money?’
      • ‘Let's just put that into perspective for a second Chelsea are a team who are made up of several international and high value players worth millions.’
      • ‘To qualify as buyers residents have to be worth $5m or their local currency equivalent.’
      • ‘Bielsa found he was worth one third of the original value due to the financial crisis.’
      • ‘The amount of money she was worth could feed a Third World nation with gastronomic delights.’
      • ‘So you are saying that a human life is worth a specific amount of money?’
      • ‘As long as you value who you are, you'll always be worth a zillion bucks.’
      • ‘If you're worth that amount of money, you tell people what you really think.’
      • ‘The disenfranchised people were turned into a resource, worth only the market price of their labour power.’

noun

  • 1The value equivalent to that of someone or something under consideration; the level at which someone or something deserves to be valued or rated.

    ‘they had to listen to every piece of gossip and judge its worth’
    • ‘Give praise and positive feedback - your child measures her worth and achievements by what you think of her.’
    • ‘If each person has equal worth, the limitations on their achievement and contribution must be systematically broken down.’
    • ‘Self-esteem is the vision and feeling that you have about your own self worth.’
    • ‘Your argument seems to suggest that people everywhere measure worth primarily or exclusively in terms of monetary value.’
    • ‘There have been countless arguments over the years about the worth of level wind mechanisms on boat fishing reels.’
    • ‘But the real battle was in midfield, where the collective worth of one unit, tended to cancel out the merits of the other.’
    • ‘I've been continuously looking for my own self worth through the words of someone else.’
    • ‘Assess your job role now, compared to what it was when you started, so that you can put a value on your current worth.’
    • ‘A moral criterion is the measure we use for determining the value or worth of an action, principle, rule or attitude.’
    • ‘Unable to make a single decision you tend to measure your worth by the number of meetings you can schedule for yourself.’
    • ‘Clinch also advises working out your current net worth once a year so you can see if you are still on track to meet your financial goals.’
    • ‘No calculations were provided to show what portion of the pension worth was the equalized value.’
    • ‘If the financial bottom line was the only measure of the companies' worth, there would probably be no argument.’
    • ‘The ultimate measure of a brand's worth is its ability to sustain sales from loyal customers.’
    • ‘The real surprise is that there is a book's worth of information on the subject to merit publication.’
    • ‘I'd say that unless you judge a person's work by their status, you need some way of distinguishing worth.’
    • ‘Chris Cawley said the value of the contract goes far beyond its monetary worth.’
    • ‘You get a 30 billion dollar net worth by taking a risk and starting a mail order computer company.’
    • ‘Amis has always insisted that aesthetics are the sole standard for judging the worth of literature.’
    • ‘He believes there are creditors and shareholders who believe the club's worth cannot be summed up in a profit and loss account.’
    1. 1.1 An amount of a commodity equivalent to a specified sum of money.
      ‘he admitted stealing 10,000 dollars' worth of computer systems’
      • ‘At the same time it won an order to supply 1.5 billion euros worth of equipment for 3G licenses.’
      • ‘All the Plus edition models feature more than £3,000 worth of extra equipment.’
      • ‘There's more than half-a-million pounds' worth of prize money for these first three races.’
      • ‘For every pound that the company spends, it only makes 10p worth of extra sales.’
      • ‘Some HK $7.1 billion worth of apparel was exported in the first quarter of this year.’
      • ‘The only way her husband can get the money is to provide lands of equivalent worth to Judith and her children.’
      • ‘Miss Creamer told the prison authorities she had injected £80 worth of heroin and drank up to six litres of cider or lager each day.’
      • ‘That is €1 billion worth of stock that has been, or will be, distributed tax - free.’
      • ‘In total, I had technically lost nearly four hundred dollars worth of money.’
      • ‘Lindsay alone accounted for some $300-million worth of sales over the past five years.’
      • ‘And then I suppose I'd need several million dollars worth of equipment and raw materials.’
      • ‘A petrol station cashier was tied up by robbers who stole more than £10,000 worth of goods and money.’
      • ‘Masked raiders tied up a security guard and stole thousands of pounds' worth of computer equipment from Motorola, a court heard.’
      • ‘Four years and over £10m worth of squashed fruit sales later, critics could be reviewing their scepticism.’
      • ‘Americans import six dollars worth of goods from China for every one dollar of US products sold in China.’
      • ‘Printing up trillions of dollars' worth of new money was bound to have an effect.’
      • ‘The whole of Kerala accounts for a cut-flower business worth more than Rs.3 crores a year.’
      • ‘Twelve pence worth of leaf gold was an expensive amount.’
      value, financial value, monetary value, price, asking price, selling price, cost
      View synonyms
    2. 1.2 The amount that could be achieved or produced in a specified time.
      ‘the companies have debts greater than two years' worth of their sales’
      • ‘The Jammu region itself has been importing crores worth of fruits in these years.’
      • ‘He said his shops record up to five weeks' worth of sales during the Galway Races.’
      • ‘I mean, I don't think that you could say that you got half a million dollars' worth of sales from it.’
      • ‘It takes about 15 minutes to identify and mark the ads in an hour's worth of programming.’
      • ‘The woman took away the gauze and a month's worth of meal money, and Dorothy took Wilma home.’
      • ‘For the Trust it marked not just a few months' worth of campaigning but represented the culmination of nearly half a century of tireless effort.’
      • ‘At present rates of consumption there are 30 or 40 years' worth of oil known to be retrievable using present methods.’
      • ‘He dialed for groceries, then walked to the mailbox pulling out several days' worth of bills and junk mail.’
      • ‘I'm back from my vacation and just spent the last hour or two catching up on a week's worth of Power Line.’
      • ‘As a rapper, he was responsible for $80 million worth of sales one year.’
      • ‘The corporation is testing a new system that will make an entire week's worth of output available at the click of a mouse.’
      • ‘To get a decent sense of the trend, calculate at least two years' worth of quarterly inventory sales numbers.’
      • ‘I got my pay cheque last week for one week's worth of work.’
      • ‘The second is that it may not be economic, as it would simply result in six days' worth of sales being spread over seven days.’
      • ‘I'm just a handful of films away from seeing the entire year's worth of quality product.’
      • ‘So this is many, many times smaller than is needed just for one year's worth of pollution from one power station.’
      • ‘In fact, you're more likely to get around one year's worth of exported content.’
      • ‘If the idea saves money, how about a bonus equal to the first month's worth of savings?’
      • ‘One even had a year's worth of transactions with account numbers from a cash machine in Illinois.’
      • ‘If you ask for, say, 300 baht worth, the meter will certainly show that amount as you hand over the cash.’
    3. 1.3 High value or merit.
      ‘he is noble and gains his position by showing his inner worth’
      • ‘You don't need a man to prove your self worth, " Waverly told her friend seriously.’
      • ‘We are asked and indeed expected to present ourselves to the world and each other as beings of value and worth.’
      • ‘James McLaren Showed his strength and worth in second-half break which inspired the best Scottish period of the game.’
      • ‘We have always tried to make her see that the inner worth of people is what is important, not the expensive trappings on the outside.’
      • ‘It takes years to build up your image and esteem to the point where the your inner sense of worth meets your outer sense.’
      • ‘Given the context of a man seemingly re-evaluating his sense of inner worth, how does he feel now about his music having been used in car adverts?’
      • ‘This year he has certainly proved his worth and talent ten times over.’
      • ‘But in France the revolutionary spirit was still strong and the common people had gained a sense of their power and their worth.’
      • ‘Good as they are for reading or study or the like, their real value or worth is in their being voiced in common prayer.’
      • ‘We need to resist thinking that this proves our superior worth and attainment.’
      • ‘No longer do you have to achieve something of worth or have a famous or incredibly rich relation.’
      • ‘Sure, comedy is tough: it requires actual laughter to prove its value and worth.’
      • ‘There's no place in this existence where athletes feel the meaning, worth or value they did as athletes.’
      • ‘No one becomes a decent human being without the love and caring of someone who truly values their worth.’
      • ‘First, let me say that Otto Rehhagel has demonstrated the true worth of a genuinely gifted coach.’
      • ‘Personally, I didn't think a person's status as alive was dependent on moral worth.’
      • ‘Lesser shows were put into the same pot with retrospectives of quality, significance and worth.’
      • ‘The Greeks expressed a belief in the worth, significance, and dignity of the individual.’
      • ‘Regular keeper Lee Ward is on holiday for three weeks, but that should give an opportunity for new signing Mark Thornley to show his worth.’
      • ‘You may have always known his worth on an intellectual level, but now it becomes real to you.’
      benefit, advantage, use, value, virtue, usefulness, utility, service, gain, profit, avail, validity, help, assistance, aid
      worthiness, merit, meritoriousness, credit, value, excellence, calibre, quality, stature, eminence, greatness, consequence, importance, significance, distinction, superiority
      View synonyms

Phrases

  • for all someone is worth

    • 1informal As energetically or enthusiastically as someone can.

      ‘he thumps the drums for all he's worth’
      • ‘Let him not worry if he cannot avoid killing the snake, but try for all he is worth to overcome the anger and ill-will of men by his patient endeavour as a first step towards cultivating universal love.’
      • ‘Just when things look darkest, there is a glimmer of hope, and the good guy decides he is going to fight for all he is worth to get what he wants.’
      • ‘Haircuts have always been something my son is extremely resistive to that he tends to fight for all he is worth.’
    • 2informal So as to obtain everything one can from someone.

      ‘the youths milked him for all he was worth and then disappeared’
      • ‘Sue him for all he is worth, and take back every penny you ever gave this scrub of a human.’
      • ‘If you want to experience Beethoven for all he is worth using your best acoustic resources, then you probably will be able to find better recordings of each individual piece.’
  • for what it is worth

    • Used to present a comment, suggestion, or opinion without making a claim as to its importance or validity.

      ‘for what it's worth, she's very highly thought of abroad’
      • ‘So, for what it is worth, let me stress yet again: beta blockers significantly reduce mortality after acute myocardial infarction.’
      • ‘Still, any form of prophesying requires a logical formula and, for what it is worth, here is mine.’
      • ‘The plot, for what it is worth, is buried under a plethora of colour and movement.’
      • ‘I know there will be a good many people who will say I'm not right, but for what it is worth, I tell you I'm not wrong either.’
      • ‘It's a lot to get from one little book but that's my experience, for what it is worth.’
      • ‘My own view, for what it is worth, is that where national governments fund health care they have a legitimate interest in properly funding research into treatment.’
      • ‘The standard argument for remedying or compensating for inequalities, for what it is worth, is a moral one.’
      • ‘My own opinion, for what it is worth, is that Ethel was almost certainly guilty.’
      • ‘My own view, for what it is worth, is that we should start not with law but with morality.’
      • ‘My advice, for what it is worth, is that you should confine yourself to telling the story, entering the minds of the leading characters from time to time, and telling us what they are thinking and feeling.’
  • worth one's salt

    • Good or competent at the job or profession specified.

      ‘any astrologer worth her salt would have predicted this’
      • ‘Let's see if you are really worth your salt as a politician.’
      • ‘Forget a lazy few hours of relaxing and leafing your way leisurely through the papers - any parent worth their salt will be filling every second of their family life with enriching, life-enhancing activities.’
      • ‘Like most musicians worth their salt, Phelps enjoys recording but his true love can be found playing live.’
      • ‘The argument that their active lives, and so income, are short, is nonsense, for any sportsperson worth their salt can carve a very good living from coaching, promotional and communications work.’
      • ‘Any scientist worth their salt will point out many ways in which their theories can be proven wrong.’
      • ‘Any nutritionist worth their salt would point you in the direction of the meal with high fiber, protein, and natural ingredients.’
      • ‘They further argue that no professional worth his salt would want to do other extra-curricular activity that somewhat demean him or her in some foreign land if he or she has the option of comfortably making ends meet at home.’
      • ‘Personal trainers that are worth their salt, can spot poor alignment, correct it and make sure that you are doing the exercise properly.’
      • ‘Any childminder worth their salt should provide an excellent environment for children of any age.’
      • ‘But, as any proselytiser of right-wing economics worth their salt will tell you, free trade agreements don't work, either ideologically or practically.’
  • worth one's while (or worth while)

  • worth it

    • informal Sufficiently good, enjoyable, or successful to repay any effort, trouble, or expense.

      ‘it requires a bit of patience to learn, but it's well worth it’
      • ‘After a lot of arguing with my mom, she finally told me that it would be expensive and not worth it.’
      • ‘It will be an inconvenience for a while, but hopefully it will be worth it in the end.’
      • ‘It turns out that Louise is having a ball, and her efforts have been worth it for the ego boost alone.’
      • ‘If this has the potential to save just one life it will be totally worth it.’
      • ‘The travelling has been a bit of a hassle, but one that's been totally worth it.’
      • ‘More expensive shirts tend to be worth it in the end, because they last longer.’
      • ‘We face the trek back up the beach now, but I decide that on balance the effort has been worth it.’
      • ‘It was quite expensive but still worth it, I thought, for the freedom it would give me.’
      • ‘Goose is more expensive than turkey but it's worth it for the rich buttery flavour of the meat.’
      • ‘The path to Top Withens was uphill all the way, so we were all a bit knackered when we got there but it was worth it for the view.’

Origin

Old English w(e)orth (adjective and noun), of Germanic origin; related to Dutch waard and German wert.

Pronunciation

worth

/wərTH//wərθ/