Definition of world-beater in US English:

world-beater

noun

  • A person or thing that is better than all others in its field.

    • ‘They could have used me as a role model to encourage other kids from underprivileged backgrounds to take up skiing - I mean, it's not as if we are world-beaters, are we?’
    • ‘They wouldn't be what you'd call world-beaters but they're a great bunch of lads.’
    • ‘Forever desperate to present his charges as potential world-beaters four years down the line, he should wise up to the fact that moulding them into a team merely tough to beat might be as good as it can get.’
    • ‘Expectations are always high, but Eriksson has not inherited a team of world-beaters and they are playing one of the Cup favourites.’
    • ‘The Wallabies have attained their status as world-beaters through their ability to keep the ball, their continuity stifling the life out of their opponents.’
    • ‘In detail England looked like world-beaters as last season's championship kicked off with a 44-15 drubbing of Wales at the Millennium Stadium.’
    • ‘England fans have been praying that Rooney could step off the treatment table and immediately transform England from unimaginative plodders into sparkling world-beaters.’
    • ‘They'll be world-beaters by the year 2364, mark our words.’
    • ‘Fortunately, one of the English press, supporters and especially the players' main weaknesses is their belief that they are world-beaters.’
    • ‘They won't be world-beaters in the lower division for, as Terry Doyle himself says, it's a well-structured professional league.’
    • ‘Yes, has-beens are transformed into world-beaters.’
    • ‘That's not to say that Kerry are world-beaters and the lack of what makes Dublin a poor team - forwards - can well please the Kerry management.’
    • ‘If the two countries work together, they can be world-beaters in this field.’
    • ‘It makes no more sense to brand Scotland hopeless on the evidence of Amsterdam than it does to herald them world-beaters on the strength of what happened in Glasgow.’
    • ‘The firm, which began life as a University of Bradford commercial spin-off eight years ago, has established itself as a world-beater in its field.’
    • ‘If it's the same team, how come they were bad in one area, yet world-beaters in another?’
    • ‘They might not be world-beaters in waiting for 2004, but at least they will get an invitation to the party, one from which the global stars of the future may be identified.’
    • ‘And look what happened in the last campaign with Ireland - they showed that Italy aren't world-beaters if you get in their face, play with real passion, pressure them and take the game to the them.’
    • ‘However, it wasn't all plain sailing for the hosts, who contrived to make Peterhead look like world-beaters with plenty of unforced errors in the first half.’
    • ‘All that said, they did not often look like world-beaters even on their own patch and Woodward clearly meant what he said when he observed that there was still plenty of room for improvement.’

Pronunciation

world-beater

/ˈwərld ˌbidər//ˈwərld ˌbēdər/