Definition of wood pigeon in English:

wood pigeon

noun

  • A large Eurasian and African pigeon with mainly gray plumage, using wing claps in display flight.

    • ‘The bush has abundant bird life, including the bellbird, tomtit, rifleman, wood pigeon and grey warbler.’
    • ‘The Government was also warned over allowing the hunting of wood pigeon during the breeding season, contravening the Wild Birds Directive.’
    • ‘The menu includes petti di colombiaccia al barolo, a pan-fried wood pigeon dish, or the more familiar spinach and ricotta cannelloni.’
    • ‘Here, he fed me a physically light but palatally super-heavy duck liver and foie gras tartine, roasted quail with deep-fried quails' eggs, and a brilliant wood pigeon on parsnip risotto.’
    • ‘Lili's wood pigeon was tender and deliciously gamey, the bed of fried shallots on which it rested the perfect accompaniment.’
    • ‘My favourite birdsong, if you can call it such, is that of the wood pigeon but they seem to be late risers and don't contribute their more soothing sound to the early morning shrieking.’
    • ‘Tall shrubs provide the higher vantage points and nest sites preferred by birds such as wood pigeon.’
    • ‘Numbers of the particularly shy wood pigeon were also up by 594 per cent and were recorded in 54 per cent of gardens.’
    • ‘He, being a well-travelled, well-eaten man, chose the Thai salad and then roast wood pigeon with potatoes, salsify, lardons and thyme cream sauce.’
    • ‘Have I mentioned that my favourite New Zealand bird is the kereru, the native wood pigeon?’
    • ‘He insists on taking her for sushi, where he orders in the most expert way, and after discussing the pleasures of wood pigeon and foie gras, tells her, ‘You'll want to eat with me for the rest of your life.’’
    • ‘She is, it would seem, rather more arboreal than we had realised; he has more than once encountered her comfortably ensconced in the crook of a tree twenty feet above the ground, placidly dissecting a wood pigeon or some such.’
    • ‘In this area you may see the brown creeper, tomtit, robin, bellbird, rifleman, wood pigeon, falcon and kea.’
    • ‘The collared dove and wood pigeon are now five times more common in British gardens than in 1979, according to the results of the RSPB 25th Garden Birdwatch survey.’
    • ‘Until recently, winter nesting in British birds has been very rare beyond a handful of species that include the wood pigeon, feral pigeon, and collared dove.’
    • ‘Even larger is the wood pigeon, which has a grey head, neck, back and tail.’
    • ‘Wild birds that might be acceptable alternatives for William include woodcock, wood pigeon, partridge and grouse.’
    • ‘Jackdaws and wood pigeon show little overall change, but numbers of skylark and grey partridge have declined steeply.’
    • ‘No sound of traffic, neither road nor air, but a variety of birds none of which I can recognise but could guess at various members of the finch family, the tit family, and the odd wood pigeon.’
    • ‘I found a broken wood pigeon egg at the base of a Tamarisk tree, the wind having thrown it out.’

Pronunciation:

wood pigeon

/ˈwo͝od ˌpijən/