Definition of with a bang in US English:

with a bang

phrase

  • 1Abruptly.

    ‘the remark brought me down to earth with a bang’
    • ‘However, he failed to impress Bobby Williamson sufficiently, returning to earth with a bang.’
    • ‘Next up was Arsenal and we were brought back down to earth with a bang and a 2-1 defeat.’
    • ‘He certainly brought Frenchman Sebastien Grosjean down to earth with a bang in the semi-finals.’
    • ‘It's back down to Earth with a bang for the Performance Workshop's latest production, however.’
    • ‘Now, that bought me back down to earth with a bang.’
    • ‘He was dumped like hot potato after his first film flopped but he came with a bang with ‘Chandni Bar’ and established himself with ‘Satta’.’
    • ‘In a season when British Athletics crashed back to earth with a bang after the successes of Sydney, she was one of the few to illuminate a disappointing year.’
    • ‘Weybridge golfer Paul Casey, ranked 29th in the world, came down to earth with a bang in the Open last week when he failed to make the cut for the final two rounds.’
    • ‘Fifty five years is a long time to wait for a repeat and both men are confident that this mighty English team can be brought down to earth with a bang on Sunday.’
    • ‘Luckily, London has a canny knack of bringing you back down to earth with a bang and ensuring you don't get unbearably maudlin - take, for instance, yesterday's weepy moment.’
    • ‘We have paid the penalty for not being prepared and we have been brought down to earth with a bang.’
    • ‘Ms Del Duca left with a bang, accusing council of ‘staff problems’ and ‘citizens still not getting the service’.’
    • ‘RI's title rivals, Malton and Norton, fell to earth with a bang following the euphoria they enjoyed after their Tetley's Bitter Vase semi-final win last week.’
    • ‘And who knows, if we have another extended bout of irrational exuberance, how high the shares might climb before coming back to earth with a bang?’
    • ‘An exuberant Mozilla Foundation has been brought back down to earth with a bang by the world's internet organisations.’
    • ‘I will always remember the 1990s as the decade in which the mythologicals came down to earth with a bang.’
    • ‘‘We've come right back down to earth with a bang,’ he said.’
    • ‘Bypassing Byzantine state restrictions would open up competition with a bang… and most certainly lead to dramatic reductions in insurance costs.’
    • ‘After last week's great win over Camlough Rovers, Bessbrook United were brought down to earth with a bang when Kilkeel Athletic held them to a 3-3 draw.’
  • 2Impressively or spectacularly.

    ‘the occasion went with a bang’
    ‘the day starts with a bang—the steep climb to the mountain top’
    • ‘It sure opens with a bang: Detroit Rock City, the boys clomping around the stage to that ageless opening riff, the orchestra blasting horns and sawing fiddles like enraged monkeys.’
    • ‘The final of the Buster Under-19 basketball championship ended this year's Inter-Secondary School Sports program with a bang!’
    • ‘It was Motherless Brooklyn, Lethem's fifth novel in as many years, that finally landed him back in the old neighborhood, with a bang that woke the literary world.’
    • ‘A trip to the Isle Of Wight went with a bang - literally - for dozens of pensioners.’
    • ‘Their promise to make good on leaving the NAIA with a bang hinges upon success in these games.’
    • ‘With a whole slew of new crew alliances, nights, guest DJs, clubs and parties to talk about, Montreal has started the year with a bang, so let's cut to the chase and get down to the nitty-gritty.’
    • ‘A huge group of audience members were invited on the stage to ‘get down’ while the ladies went out with a bang in the final show of their very first headlining tour.’
    • ‘The concept is so original and it started with a bang, the audience being welcomed to the occasion one by one with some amusing improvisation.’
    • ‘Four hundred years after the Gunpowder Plot, Mr Fawkes' election night hardly went with a bang.’
    • ‘That will set us up nicely for next year and we can start next season with a bang.’
    • ‘A3, as the album is otherwise known, has hit the stands with a bang after packaging it with ‘catchy’ music and endorsement by the superstar, says the company.’
    • ‘The 2004/2005 pheasant shoot will begin with a bang.’
    • ‘The fundraising evening held in aid of the Southern Area Hospice Services turned out to be a brilliant success and proceeded to start the annual charity efforts with a bang.’
    • ‘Fence has launched a book series, and done it with a bang - two forceful choices that come out of different worlds in different tones and at different speeds.’
    • ‘I even thought 2003 had come in with a bang when a smooch on New Year's Eve progressed to a steamy taxi ride back to my folks' house, who heard nothing of our hanky-pankying.’
    • ‘‘The Magic of Chemistry’ performance led by Malcolm Armstrong was put on for year seven and eight pupils at Castle View School and literally went with a bang.’
    • ‘Since beginning their season with a bang and four successive wins, the Minstermen have seen their form and fortune dip, rise and dip again.’
    • ‘We are coming back with a bang and I know everyone will really like our new songs’.’
    • ‘Their July wedding at St Barnabas's Church went with a bang, despite suffering a few rather unusual hitches.’
    • ‘Pyrotechnic specialists Pa-Boom will round off the celebrations with a bang by providing a spectacular display of sound and smoke.’
    • ‘The political year 2003/2004 ended with a bang.’
    • ‘Earlier, the Boxing Day card started with a bang as McCoy and Doumen treated spectators to an epic tussle.’
    • ‘In his last post of our week-long debate on the supposed ‘Constitution in Exile’ movement, Cass Sunstein goes out with a bang.’
    • ‘Linda Jones, the university's enterprise director, said: ‘We're sorry to see the old building go but at least we can make sure that it departs with a bang.’’
    • ‘‘Pinafore’ proved that Ballina is back with a bang on the light operatic scene and that its exile has in no way resulted in a general diminution of talent.’
    • ‘In October, Miller kicked off the current season with a bang, nailing a win in the giant slalom at Sölden, Austria, by more than a second - a huge margin.’
    • ‘Nick Warren, owner of Big Nick's Karaoke, waived his normal £200 fee to ensure the party went with a bang.’
    • ‘They may have started the competition with a bang, but South Korea's women's coach, Won Geo Seo, played down the importance of their record-breaking achievements.’
    • ‘After starting the season with a bang and matching the club's record start, Saturday's dismissal of Richard Hope saw City equal another record, this time for the number of red cards in a campaign.’
    • ‘And the only thing you can do, if you leave ‘American Idol,’ is go out with a bang, and I think that he definitely, definitely did that.’
    • ‘But after two years of disappointing cancellations, due to the foot and mouth outbreak and access problems, organisers wanted to attract as many people as possible to make it go with a bang.’
    • ‘It probably means a little bit more to Ian than a normal game because he wants to start with a bang.’
    • ‘Local groups Detox and Catch 22 will get the night's entertainment off with a bang at approximately 8.30 pm for what should prove a highly entertaining night.’
    • ‘If we go out we are determined to go out with a bang.’
    • ‘To begin with a bang: Members are informed that the recording of the much-awaited project - Thiruvasakam in Symphony - in Hungary was over.’
    • ‘Tony Sullivan made sure Lancashire Day went with a bang in the county capital with a late, late FA Trophy winner against Bromsgrove.’
    • ‘The 2004 Chelmsford Spectacular started and finished with a bang, with chart toppers The Sugababes headlining the opening night of the annual event.’