Definition of with in English:

with

preposition

  • 1Accompanied by (another person or thing)

    ‘a nice steak with a bottle of red wine’
    • ‘She picked up her make up bag and left the wash room, heading to the bedroom she shared with her best friend.’
    • ‘It allows me to have a bit of a flirt and a bit of a laugh with some very nice girls.’
    • ‘Contents insurance can be bought separately, with building cover or in a joint policy.’
    • ‘Place the polenta, flour and baking powder in a bowl with the salt and sugar.’
    • ‘Apparently, we are going to be able to put plastic in with our cans and bottles.’
    • ‘I need a nice early night with my boy and hopefully a tiny bit of a lie in!’
    • ‘She trained at the Royal Ballet School and performed briefly with the Royal Ballet.’
    • ‘It is accompanied with a golden vest and hair ornament hanging down to the shoulder.’
    • ‘He thought I was going to force him to sit in a corner and drink a bottle of wine with me.’
    • ‘John is just a lovely man and the rest of the cast, I mean you couldn't ask to work with nicer people.’
    • ‘The tamarind provides a novel change to lemon as an accompaniment with the prawn.’
    • ‘Lunch would be stew or steak and kidney pud with potatoes and boiled green vegetables.’
    • ‘And when it got dark he came in and played hurling games in the bedroom with his brothers.’
    • ‘The same could not be said of my fillet steak with a Stilton and red wine sauce.’
    • ‘She hooked up with a nice couple in England, and now they exchange occasional letters.’
    • ‘She grew up in a small house in Brixton, sharing a bedroom with three brothers.’
    • ‘I went for a nice meal with my parents yesterday before having to catch the train home.’
    • ‘Stumped for a good red wine capable of accompanying duck served with a bitter cherry sauce?’
    • ‘It takes me right back to the bedroom I shared with my brothers back in the early seventies.’
    • ‘The truffle taste was strong and earthy and worked in nice harmony with the risotto.’
    accompanied by, in the company of, escorted by
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 In proportion to.
      ‘the form of the light curve changes with period in a systematic way’
  • 2Possessing (something) as a feature or accompaniment.

    ‘a flower-sprigged blouse with a white collar’
    • ‘He is still best known as a financier with a reputation that carries weight in the City and beyond.’
    • ‘He appeared drunk and was wearing a white sweatshirt with blue writing in the centre.’
    • ‘He wore a black beanie hat with a white stripe, jeans, and a black, padded, hooded jacket.’
    • ‘In fact it does not permit entry to people with relatively minor criminal records.’
    • ‘Upstairs is the huge master bedroom with a pitched-pine floor and vaulted ceilings.’
    • ‘On the first floor are four large doubles bedrooms with en suites as well as a single room.’
    • ‘When she vanished Sammy was wearing navy tracksuit bottoms with a white stripe down both legs.’
    • ‘The modern bathroom is fitted with a white three-piece suite including a corner bath.’
    • ‘It was narrow but tall, with dark red curtains hanging at each side and trailing on the floor.’
    • ‘At least if I play things right I can slip out at the end into a nice public sector job with a pension.’
    • ‘The house was fitted with a smoke alarm at the top of the stairs but the battery had run out.’
    • ‘The lake is an official recreation area with all sorts of water activities plus hiking and camping.’
    • ‘After all, people with money and status employ other people to clean up after them.’
    • ‘Her eyes were alight, her hair flaxen, her golden skin shining with more than just the glow of youth.’
    • ‘He is also a keen violinist, with vast experience performing in various countries.’
    • ‘Its website is really nice, with lots of old articles and a complete cover gallery.’
    • ‘The pint-sized bottles with the green labels were called screw tops and were a powerful icon to me.’
    • ‘I'm not one of those that laments the old thick dimpled beer tankards with handles on the side.’
    • ‘The Firth of Tay glittered like crumpled silver foil, and the city shone with an inner light.’
    • ‘He was wearing dark trousers and a white shirt with a collar, which he wore unbuttoned.’
    1. 2.1 Marked by or wearing.
      ‘a small man with thick glasses’
      ‘a tall dark man with a scar on one cheek’
      • ‘He was a slight man wearing owl glasses, with thin brown hair that left a bald spot on the back of his head.’
      • ‘She was a bit taller than Dai with short thick curly hair and tanned skin, much like his own.’
      • ‘On a bad-takings day, he'd show up with dark glasses and a white stick and blow his harmonica.’
      • ‘He was wearing dark blue jeans, with a dark blue hooded jacket and a blue plastic coat.’
      • ‘Thinly built, with thick glasses and K-Mart clothes, Lee is as cheery as he is modest.’
      • ‘After a short wait, a tall man with cropped dark hair and warm green eyes opened the door.’
      • ‘Joanne is described as white, with light blonde hair worn just below her shoulders.’
      • ‘The man with the white beard rose to his feet and strode over to the baby weeping on the ground.’
      • ‘Will I get in trouble for trawling the streets of Torquay with a can of Stella in my hand?’
      • ‘The victim is white and stocky, with brown eyes, a square jaw and a pointed nose.’
      • ‘He accompanies me back, with some tools, which prove not to be any help whatsoever.’
      • ‘Mr Massow was on television this morning again, with his rather alarming new haircut.’
      • ‘She is also five feet five inches tall with a scar under her nose and brown hair.’
      • ‘The woman is described as white, young, with brown hair and is believed to be called Debbie.’
  • 3Indicating the instrument used to perform an action.

    ‘cut it with a knife’
    ‘treatment with acid before analysis’
    • ‘He had a seat belt on and we cut it with a knife and tried to pull him out but we couldn't.’
    • ‘Cut off the top of the heads with a serrated knife and squeeze out the garlic pulp.’
    • ‘Quarter the apples, then peel and cut away the core with a small paring knife.’
    • ‘The proposal would also make it an offence to hit a child with an instrument, such as a belt or a cane.’
    • ‘He attacked him with a bottle in the town centre after asking him for money.’
    • ‘She had been struck three times across the back of the head with a blunt instrument, believed to be a hammer.’
    • ‘Swimming and fishing with home-made rods was still very popular when he was growing up.’
    • ‘I grabbed the knife to try and stop him, but somebody behind me hit me on the head with a bottle.’
    • ‘Dissolve the glucose and water together, and with an electric whisk add this to the egg mix.’
    • ‘My throat felt rather like it had been scraped with a sharp metal instrument.’
    • ‘All I achieved was to bang a hole in my bedroom wall with the heel of my foot.’
    • ‘He believes the problem started when someone armed with a Stanley knife took to cutting tyres.’
    • ‘When I cut through it with my saw, the centre was rotten, so it's just as well it was coming out.’
    • ‘A motorist who stopped in a lay-by was hit over the head with a bottle and robbed.’
    • ‘She cuts the potato into chip shapes with a knife, puts them in a pan full of cold oil and turns on the gas.’
    • ‘The lever couldn't be removed without undoing the nut so I decided to cut it with my hacksaw.’
    • ‘They set to work on the oxhide with the knives and cut it into a single thin strip.’
    • ‘One of them steps forward and with his knife cuts the burden free and it falls to the bottom of the ravine.’
    • ‘It need not be so thick you could cut it with a knife, but it should be well on the way.’
    • ‘Anything with a crust, between two slices of bread or poured into a bowl and eaten with a spoon is allowed.’
    1. 3.1 Indicating the material used for some purpose.
      ‘fill the bowl with water’
      • ‘Brush the pastry with egg and cut two holes in the top to let the steam out.’
      • ‘Place the salad in a bowl and top with the tomatoes, feta and warm aubergine.’
      • ‘Moisten the edges of the pastry with water and then wrap it around the meat, pressing the joins well to seal.’
      • ‘She watched him as he grabbed a glass from the draining board and filled it with water.’
      • ‘Using a slotted spoon, fill the lined bowl with the fruit to about a centimetre below the top.’
      • ‘Put the potatoes into a saucepan, cover with cold water, add salt and cook until tender.’
      • ‘Cover with a cut piece of greased paper and then wrap well in several layers of protective foil.’
      • ‘Is it me, or is it also missing the fact that you'll need to get up to fill the kettle with water in the first place?’
      • ‘Usually the barrel is merely rinsed or filled with cold water to check for leaks.’
      • ‘He said it took the two crews ten minutes to fight the fire with foam and ten minutes to damp the car down with water.’
      • ‘I have a memory of being splattered with holy water but I might have made that up.’
      • ‘He returned a few moments later with white clothes and a mug filled with sweet water.’
      • ‘On the table was a vase of plastic wildflowers in a vase partly filled with plastic water.’
      • ‘Fill your bath with hot water, and add a generous amount of bath oil or gel for that touch of luxury.’
      • ‘I'd also suggest you eat porridge in the morning, making it with water instead of milk.’
      • ‘We filled it with water and added blue dye, so that if it leaked then we could tell easily.’
      • ‘Rub the monk fish tail with the garlic and dill and lay it an oven-proof dish.’
      • ‘The tin bath was hung on a nail on the back yard wall, was brought indoors on bath days, filled with hot water.’
      • ‘Shake a few gravy granules, or break a stock cube over the top and fill the dish with water.’
      • ‘She took the kettle out of its cradle and filled it with water before setting it to boil.’
  • 4In opposition to.

    ‘we started fighting with each other’
    • ‘It was easy to fight with Livi sometimes, but it was also hard trying to stay mad at her for very long.’
    • ‘He became involved in a fight with some other children and his left elbow was dislocated.’
    • ‘So much information has come up since my fight with Shirley and none of it is good.’
    • ‘He shows a teenage mother fighting with the father of her child about his failings as a parent.’
    • ‘I told her about the fight Kip had with Nathanial, and she and Rio were as shocked as I was.’
    • ‘Teachers learned about the incident when Kyle was spotted fighting with the boy.’
    • ‘Edwards' next major contribution was to have a fight with Patel which earned both a yellow card.’
    • ‘Three years ago he was convicted of actual bodily harm, after a fight with a neighbour.’
    • ‘He even claimed to have fought with him in the hills and he threatened to show us his wound.’
    • ‘One night, after a fight with the man, she took an unknown dose of sleeping pills.’
    • ‘She has a fight with Queenie in a ladies loo, which gets seriously out of hand.’
    • ‘To do this meant a fight with the old London County Council and the government about money.’
    • ‘You go to him and tell him that Ramacandra does not have any intention to fight with him.’
    • ‘There is no way that they want to enter a fight with millions of workers this close to an election.’
    • ‘I met one man who had quit his job after a row with his boss and had terrible difficulty finding another.’
    • ‘A guy who was part of the sanitation police was there and he started fighting with them.’
    • ‘Fights with the riot police erupted every time people tried to reach the US embassy.’
    • ‘He was apparently angry after arguing with his girlfriend and took out that anger on the dog.’
    • ‘James goes off to fight with the Pretender, and is reported to have been killed at Culloden.’
    • ‘He only fought with real men who deserved it, not little boys who taunted and teased.’
  • 5Indicating the manner or attitude of the person doing something.

    ‘with great reluctance’
    • ‘Many of those who voted in favour did so with a reluctance somewhat aside from the military arguments.’
    • ‘The link is the instruments for which they are written, performed with great skill and feeling.’
    • ‘It is a juggling act he accomplished with some aplomb during his first half-season in charge.’
    • ‘It meant that down the years we would collide always with the same pleasure.’
    • ‘I pulled the chain on the shade of my bedroom window with a certain mournful sense of ceremony.’
    • ‘Every person has a responsibility to behave with integrity, honesty and fairness.’
    • ‘Large checks, iridescent fabrics and decadent velvet are all worn with attitude.’
    • ‘She came to his studio with attitude, but cradled his face in her hands to kiss him before she left.’
  • 6Indicating responsibility.

    ‘leave it with me’
    • ‘The final sentence, however, rests with the judge and Beaney may still be put behind bars.’
    • ‘The final decision on that rests with the trade and industry secretary.’
    • ‘The hopes for the future of any local community rest largely with its young people.’
    • ‘In libel the burden of proof rests with the defendant, and there is no entitlement to legal aid.’
  • 7In relation to.

    ‘my father will be angry with me’
    • ‘She had tried desperately to be angry with William Ingalls, but all she wanted to do was die.’
    • ‘Don't try this exercise when either of you is feeling angry or hurt with the other.’
    • ‘After all, in the other sins God was angry with people who were hurting other people.’
    • ‘Brown was so angry with his players that he could barely bring himself to talk to them.’
    • ‘I am getting very angry with teams bringing it to us and us being slow starters.’
    • ‘You were angry with the monks for deciding this, but afraid that this would come true.’
    • ‘He tried to get me to stop, obviously, but I just got more and more angry with him.’
    • ‘Many people in the Labour Party are angry with Smith because of his support for the war.’
    • ‘Should this change be accepted everyone who is angry with his brother may be judged.’
    • ‘There are a lot of people in power wanting to make it real easy to be angry with America.’
    • ‘He said that then he tore my drawing up and threw it in the fire because he was angry with me.’
    • ‘Other times, he will say that he is angry with us, and that we have to be sad.’
    • ‘Was she so angry with me that she was ignoring me or did she really not care about what happened?’
    • ‘She was a master of tuning him out when she was angry with him and it drove him nuts.’
    • ‘They feel betrayed and are as angry with Bush and Blair as those who always opposed the war.’
    • ‘I felt angry with them for being so upbeat and pretending that nothing had happened.’
    • ‘I was about to turn and talk to Rachel but remembered that she was angry with me.’
    • ‘Two of his children had died and they said it was because the gods were angry with him.’
    • ‘She wasn't sure if Jadrien was angry with her or just James, but she didn't want to find out.’
    • ‘She knew it was a childish action but she found that she was not angry with him anymore.’
    1. 7.1 Affected by (a particular fact or condition)
      ‘with no hope’
      ‘in bed with lumbago’
      • ‘A high proportion of women with osteoarthritis of the hip also have low bone density.’
      • ‘Blue and yellow are not distinguished by those with this condition, and may be seen as white or grey.’
      • ‘It is the largest clinical trial to be carried out in patients with early ovarian cancer.’
      • ‘I've been laid up in bed with a nasty flu the last few days, and time is warping on me.’
    2. 7.2 Indicating the cause of an action or condition.
      ‘trembling with fear’
      ‘the paper was yellow with age’
      • ‘She just stood there; the look of terror on her face increased and she began to tremble with the fear.’
    3. 7.3 Because of (something) and as it happens.
      ‘wisdom comes with age’
  • 8Employed by.

    ‘she's with IBM now’
    • ‘If he'd still been employed with us we would have suspended him immediately, but he was retired.’
    1. 8.1 As a member or employee of.
      ‘he plays with the Cincinnati Cyclones’
      • ‘In August, the future started to look brighter after he secured a job with another removal firm.’
    2. 8.2 Using the services of.
      ‘I bank with the TSB’
  • 9In the same direction as.

    ‘marine mammals generally swim with the current’
    • ‘Our boat drifts with the gentle current for an hour or so before gently motoring over to San Toribo reef.’
  • 10Indicating separation or removal from something.

    ‘to part with one's dearest possessions’
    ‘their jobs could be dispensed with’
    • ‘The mansions formerly lining the High Street were replaced with retail premises.’

Phrases

  • away (or off or out etc.) with

    • Used in exhortations to take or send someone or something away, in, out, etc.

      ‘off with his head’
      ‘away with poverty!’
  • be with someone

    • 1Agree with or support someone.

      ‘we're all with you on this one’
      • ‘For those of you who've been with me from the beginning, thanks for the support and so long.’
      • ‘Either you were with us or you weren't.’
      • ‘At the close of the season it is timely to thank our sponsors and supporters, many of whom have been with us since Norpa's inception in 1993.’
      • ‘Paul Flannery said he was especially happy at the support of Bank of Ireland who had been with him all the way.’
      • ‘It was during times like these that he missed having Julie by his side; she would support him in this career change and she would've been with him in success and in failure.’
      • ‘We knew that there were people against it but we thought most were with us.’
      • ‘In a state like Iowa, the winner is probably only going to have 30, 35 percent of the vote, which means about two-thirds of Tom Harkin supporters are going to be with somebody else.’
      • ‘The president stated emphatically that though he had asked Powell to be with him and support him in a war, ‘I didn't need his permission.’’
    • 2Follow someone's meaning.

      ‘I'm not with you’
      • ‘While we may think the prospect is with us, or understands what we are explaining, it is often difficult for the listener to grasp the logic of our ‘argument’.’
  • with it

    • 1informal Knowledgeable about and following modern ideas and fashions.

      ‘a young, with-it film buyer’
      • ‘They're aimed at young people wanting to be seen as hip and with it.’
      in fashion, in vogue, voguish, popular, up to date, bang up to date, up to the minute, modern, all the rage, modish, trendsetting
      View synonyms
    • 2informal usually with negativeAlert and comprehending.

      ‘I'm not really with it this morning’
      quick-witted, sharp, bright, quick, keen, perceptive, wide awake, responsive, agile, acute, astute
      View synonyms
  • with that

    • At that point; immediately after saying or doing something dramatic.

      ‘with that, she flounced out of the room’

Origin

Old English, probably a shortening of a Germanic preposition related to obsolete English wither ‘adverse, opposite’.

Pronunciation