Main definitions of will in US English:

: will1will2

will1

modal verb

  • 1Expressing the future tense.

    ‘you will regret it when you are older’
    • ‘There is an expectation that there will be a reduction in staff numbers in the UK.’
    • ‘During the festival he will present a series of new sculptural and printed works.’
    • ‘Alcohol loosens tongues and will allow you to say things you will truly regret later.’
    • ‘From strong clumps you will get a great display of flowers that last for a long time.’
    • ‘Examples of these different types of regimes will be given in the next section.’
    • ‘Clarke will know that if he performs well he will be in a strong position to bid for the premiership.’
    • ‘It is usually a busy holiday weekend on the roads - but this year will be different.’
    • ‘The tax will not be for life, and will stop when the fees have been paid off.’
    • ‘Each celebrity will be taking three penalties and a trophy will be presented to the winning side.’
    • ‘Organisers hope a celebrity guest will be present for the day, which was a huge success last year.’
    • ‘Whatever he says over the next day or two, I expect he will probably take a year off and then decide what to do.’
    • ‘He will also present his views on what has been achieved so far and what is yet to come.’
    • ‘The committee will also explore different ways of funding light rail to reduce costs.’
    • ‘Capacity plans will be examined further in the next few months, but are not expected to change.’
    • ‘As the river gets deeper the stronger current will start to take you downstream.’
    • ‘When he finally gets to see the contract, he will, in all probability, laugh as much as I did.’
    • ‘Soon there will be bitter regret at all the public land being squandered irredeemably.’
    • ‘Now that she has settled into the British way of life the move to Bradford is one she will never regret.’
    • ‘Pupils from Tong School will present a piece of drama based on substance misuse.’
    • ‘If the developers decide to put the road on part of the track bed then the town council will be powerless to stop them.’
    1. 1.1 Expressing a strong intention or assertion about the future.
      ‘come what may, I will succeed’
      • ‘You have to be very strong because you will get knockbacks and you'll have to reassess.’
      • ‘There will therefore be no accidents, no speeding, no road rage and no idiotic driving.’
      • ‘Some health professionals also advocate cutting down if smokers cannot or will not stop.’
      • ‘This is an ideal taster before you rush out and buy the album - which you inevitably will.’
      • ‘If you make something special and powerful and honest and true, you will succeed.’
      • ‘As long as smoking exists in a legal capacity I will continue to smoke in designated areas.’
      • ‘The welfare of the tree is our main concern and we will do what we can to protect it.’
      • ‘I will stand in the water and look at my stretching belly and thank Lakshmi for my great good luck.’
      • ‘We are a very strong team and we will turn it around.’
      • ‘In fact, I will continue laying the table outside until everyone refuses to join me.’
      • ‘I will stop being so silly and spontaneous and open towards everyone and everything.’
      • ‘We are people who stand by our friends at times of need and we will do so now.’
      • ‘You have to believe in your own ability and that you will keep your place in the side.’
      • ‘I will persist until I succeed.’
      • ‘One day we will succeed; it may take a long time, but finally, my generation – the first global generation – will fully understand the value of nature.’
      • ‘We will win the title easily and at least a cup competition like the European or FA Cup.’
      • ‘It just takes so long to get the help needed but I'm so much stronger now and I know I will get through it.’
      • ‘We will stop the menace, so our children can once again play safely on the green.’
      • ‘As President, I will not wait for a green light from abroad when our safety is at stake.’
  • 2Expressing inevitable events.

    ‘accidents will happen’
    • ‘We cannot change the fact that people will act in a certain way.’
    • ‘There will always be different trends of opinion in any large, growing socialist party.’
    • ‘It is a necessary fact that animals will die and suffer in the pursuit of human betterment.’
    • ‘When a court makes this value judgment the facts will often speak for themselves.’
    • ‘There are other people who will want his job, who will have different ideas of what to do next.’
    have a tendency to, are bound to, have a habit of, do
    View synonyms
  • 3Expressing a request.

    ‘will you stop here, please’
    • ‘By the way, you will stop me when I get a title graphic up that everyone likes won't you?’
    1. 3.1 Expressing desire, consent, or willingness.
      ‘will you have a cognac?’
      • ‘For her vacation, Julie decides to go wherever the first car that stops will take her.’
      • ‘Bury is not hosting any official events, but will help groups to organise parties.’
      • ‘Neither man will give his consent for the use of the embryos, which is required by law.’
      • ‘He is keen to cater to all and if requested will happily search out brands he doesn't already stock.’
      • ‘The fact that some retailers will accept euros is not an argument for replacing the pound.’
      • ‘On the surface it promotes the idea that the New York Times will cover all newsworthy events.’
  • 4Expressing facts about ability or capacity.

    ‘a rock so light that it will float on water’
    ‘your tank will hold about 26 gallons’
    • ‘Remember most of the dance and aerobics videos will require a clear space for you to move in.’
    • ‘They will also float if you drop one overboard and you can scoop it up with a fish net.’
    • ‘We must develop a program that will drive the nation to a guaranteed annual income.’
    • ‘The official line is that the blocks will stop a truck driven by a suicide-bomber.’
    • ‘You should stop when the syllabub will lie in thick, soft folds, only just keeping its shape.’
    • ‘A glance at a field guide will indicate the vast area occupied by breeding curlews.’
    • ‘My present finances will run to either a pogo stick or a pair of roller skates.’
    • ‘Testing of hair will provide an indicator of drug use at the time the hair was grown.’
    • ‘Most prefer sun where their colour will be brighter, but will also cope with light shade.’
    • ‘It is, however, well established that the land with a crop on it will hold more water than a bare field.’
    • ‘The way we choose to interpret and perceive stares will influence our ability to cope with them.’
    • ‘There are shareware programs that will generate tones of frequencies you specify.’
  • 5Expressing habitual behavior.

    ‘she will dance for hours’
    • ‘If you are a few feet away from the bus stop or running towards it, the driver will not stop for you.’
    • ‘Americans will do anything to avoid a drawn match and in baseball they do anything.’
    • ‘The strongest animals will never allow themselves to be captured and put in cages.’
    • ‘He is a strong character and will make people listen to him, but he always has the argument to back his ideas up.’
    • ‘All I have to do is walk down the street and kids and adults will stop and gawk at me.’
    • ‘They will do this at a certain time of day and the great thing is to break them of the habit.’
    1. 5.1 (pronounced stressing “will”) indicating annoyance about the habitual behavior described.
      ‘he will keep intruding’
  • 6Expressing probability or expectation about something in the present.

    ‘they will be miles away by now’
    • ‘On reflection, Moss will probably feel he should have done a little better from close range.’
    • ‘Since this is a matter of probabilities, it will often not be easy to calculate.’
    • ‘However often the symptoms will be present for some months or years before help is sought.’
    • ‘Some will have strong links with churches and faith groups and community centres.’
    • ‘The anger felt in the Square Mile will probably not be comprehensible to him, but it is real.’

Usage

On the differences in use between will and shall, see shall

Phrases

  • will do

    • informal Expressing willingness to carry out a request or suggestion.

      ‘“Might be best to check.” “OK, will do.”’

Origin

Old English wyllan, of Germanic origin; related to Dutch willen, German wollen, from an Indo-European root shared by Latin velle ‘will, wish’.

Pronunciation

will

/wil/

Main definitions of will in US English:

: will1will2

will2

noun

  • 1usually in singular The faculty by which a person decides on and initiates action.

    ‘she has an iron will’
    ‘a battle of wills between children and their parents’
    ‘an act of will’
    • ‘Just as breaking the enemy's will is the surest way to success, so having our will broken is the surest path to defeat.’
    • ‘Rival deities battle to impose their wills upon the world.’
    • ‘It takes a real blockhead with a will of iron to make it worse.’
    • ‘We have to recognise that we have laid most of the building blocks already and that it is too late to win a battle of wills.’
    • ‘Both had the ability to impose their wills over their opponents.’
    • ‘They may impose their wills, but that does not bring respect.’
    • ‘Rather than conforming their minds, hearts and wills to God's purposes, humans are adept at manipulating the name of God to serve their own agendas.’
    • ‘And rather than having his will broken with the harshness of an over-firm hand, he keeps his spirit.’
    • ‘He would have burned the ‘Sea Lyrics’ on the spot, had his will been strong enough to set them aflame.’
    • ‘Conflict is always a conflict of minds and wills of the parties involved.’
    • ‘Second, it is clear that we sometimes ‘want what we by no means want to want’: our bodies react with pleasure and desire independently of our wills.’
    • ‘Ambitious on it as they are off it, the players are technically-gifted and hard-working, with a will of iron.’
    • ‘If he is determined to make this a battle of wills, the outcome could be very messy.’
    • ‘A recent television program on Siamese twins demonstrated how a pair of joined, genetically identical humans had different preferences and quite distinct wills and spirits.’
    • ‘It became this battle of wills between the two sides.’
    • ‘Indeed, like any parent of a growing child, he found himself increasingly confronting an independent entity with a will of its own.’
    • ‘After the christening, the ship majestically slides to the bottom of the harbor, and so we haven't managed after all to launch her, though that was our intention and our wills were in perfect working order.’
    • ‘The critique of Manichee dualism and determinism led him to lay strong emphasis on the will.’
    • ‘He had fear in him but a strong will that motivated him to continue with his orders.’
    • ‘The novel traces her effort to find and then preserve her own identity as a woman, with a will and desires of her own, rather than as a queen, expected to play a role that does not answer the innermost promptings of her heart.’
    determination, firmness of purpose, fixity of purpose, will power, strength of character, resolution, resolve, resoluteness, purposefulness, single-mindedness, drive, commitment, dedication, doggedness, tenacity, tenaciousness, staying power, backbone, spine
    volition, choice, option, decision, discretion, prerogative
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 Control deliberately exerted to do something or to restrain one's own impulses.
      ‘a stupendous effort of will’
      • ‘It doesn't require willpower, and it doesn't even need you to worry directly about your diet or exercise levels at all.’
      • ‘It was all downhill from there I guess: I have absolutely no willpower, damn me.’
      • ‘What underlies his willpower is the knowledge that he has trained as hard as possible.’
      • ‘Each, through sheer willpower and application, became a supreme footballer.’
      • ‘But if your willpower starts to wane, start paying more attention to what you are eating.’
      • ‘I even turned to drinking once but overcame it with hard work and willpower.’
      • ‘It took me all my willpower, which isn't much, to not ring him back.’
      • ‘My own willpower in such situations usually fails me.’
      • ‘But it is also a story of indomitable willpower, and the courage and dignity of the human spirit.’
      • ‘Now, there is no longer any need for willpower: you have remade yourself.’
      • ‘The man looked to be using every ounce of willpower he possessed to restrain himself.’
      • ‘But riding is not just another routine challenge she can master through sheer willpower.’
      • ‘She soon realized that wasn't going to work, and that simple willpower would have to do.’
      • ‘How the ambulances manage to get through in an emergency is anybody's guess, sheer willpower and good luck I think.’
      • ‘His tears were coming down his cheeks faster now but he had no will left to stop it.’
      • ‘While some have the strength and willpower to be able to quit on their own, many others will need a bit more help and support.’
      • ‘Quitting smoking is an uphill climb which requires patience, willpower and lots of tissues.’
      • ‘I am proud of myself; I have managed to fulfill a feat of endurance and willpower and maintain control over my body.’
      • ‘With a combination of willpower and unending generosity, fans managed to haul the club back from the brink.’
      • ‘It took all my willpower to restrain from running to the harbor and instead follow Mr. Kenton at a swift pace.’
    2. 1.2 A deliberate or fixed desire or intention.
      ‘Jane had not wanted them to stay against their will’
      with infinitive ‘the will to live’
      • ‘Hopefully I'll come back refreshed and with a will to get on with lots of exciting things!’
      • ‘This is a declaration of military intent, of the will to shed blood and tears for a fellow nation.’
      • ‘She says that her experience in care left her with a will and a means to destroy herself quietly for many years both physically and psychologically.’
      • ‘As Hume illustrates, we might suppose that there are no Reasons in the area of ethics - just the desires or wills of particular persons, not necessarily shared or respected by anyone else.’
      • ‘There is a will to succeed that took too long to hone to be put into retirement so soon.’
      • ‘It's likely that these TV personalities aren't actually lefty liberals with a will to help the poor and needy.’
      • ‘Like many philosophers he held that the highest form of freedom involves willing as one should, namely, having one's will in step with one's right values.’
      • ‘These were two egos competing for attention in a town where celebrities are omnipresent, each pulling in different directions, yet both fired with a will to win.’
      • ‘Jacklin is not alone in questioning the will to succeed among some of the young players in Europe.’
      • ‘Even people who care about the country are slowly having their will to change things drained out of them.’
      • ‘I doubted, as I watched over the little boy's head, that the old man would live, but there were always several people who had strong wills to live.’
      • ‘The will or desire to act can be wholesome at one moment and unwholesome at another moment.’
      • ‘Everyone who heard Boris was left feeling tremendously buoyant about life in general and bursting with a will to go out and do everything possible to help the Conservative cause.’
      • ‘Against this image of authority lay that of the tsar, the very good but very mysterious ‘little father’ of his peoples, who had his will constantly thwarted by the likes of landlords and officers, those who exercised immediate authority.’
      • ‘He won because he had to win; because for him, the will to win is as strong as the will to live.’
      • ‘Artistic talent is very often present, but the will to express this talent may be slow to appear.’
      • ‘Anyone with a will to live wouldn't have taken such a great risk.’
      desire, wish, preference, inclination, mind, disposition
      View synonyms
    3. 1.3 The thing that one desires or ordains.
      ‘the disaster was God's will’
      • ‘Instead, they explain that all humans have wills and desires, and it should not be surprising that infants also express theirs.’
      • ‘They are enacting their own selfish wills, and teaching us to do the same.’
      wish, desire, decision, choice, intention
      View synonyms
  • 2A legal document containing instructions as to what should be done with one's money and property after one's death.

    • ‘Not long after that, we found out that Mom and Dad had left us all a lot of money in their wills.’
    • ‘The couple have been to Christchurch twice before and spent a great deal of time on the last visit researching marriages and death records, wills and shipping records.’
    • ‘Members of religious orders may inherit only small life pensions and cannot dispose of property through wills.’
    • ‘He was accused of deliberately increasing the dosage of opiates used as pain relief in order to end the lives of patients who had left him money in their wills.’
    • ‘Durable power of attorney documents, like wills and trusts, can be changed or rewritten as needed.’
    • ‘In her classes, she pestered professors with questions about how the legal topic in question - wills and trusts, property law - might apply to pets.’
    • ‘Save in the case of those rash testators who make their own wills, the proper transmission of property from one generation to the next is dependent upon the due discharge by solicitors of their duties.’
    • ‘There must be many people even now who have such an agreement with their doctor and I would like to see such informal contracts accepted as legal, in the same way in which I believe codicils to wills are.’
    • ‘It's also important to draw up wills to clarify legal custody in the case of unexpected death.’
    • ‘Specifics such as whether the couples were registered partners or had drawn up legal wills shall factor into each decision.’
    • ‘The Family Records Centre, in Islington, holds census information from 1841, wills and birth, death and marriage certificates.’
    • ‘They make a big thing about their reliance on benefactors, and every ten years or so, they invite their ex-students back for a nice slap-up meal and a bit of a speech to remind us how to leave them money in our wills.’
    • ‘And those jurisdictions have also eliminated discrimination in the areas of property division, wills, stamp duty and hospital visitation rights.’
    • ‘The manual, launched on 22 February, will help in writing wills and testaments.’
    • ‘Mr Prior has reminded me that he is the nominated executor of two wills of other members of his family.’
    • ‘It is essential that both partners make wills appointing testamentary guardians in the event of their death while the children are still under 18.’
    • ‘There is a widely held view among solicitors that do-it-yourself wills only result in making lawyers richer.’
    • ‘The names revealed can then be researched in newspapers of the time and at the National Archive, where records of wills, births and deaths will reveal further information.’
    • ‘Among other material now available online is Scotland's statutory registers of births, deaths and marriages along with wills and testaments.’
    • ‘Up and down the country, thousands of other people have done the same, yet all of us knew at the time we signed such documents that these wills had no proper legal status.’
    testament, last will and testament, last wishes
    View synonyms

verb

[with object]
  • 1literary, formal Intend, desire, or wish (something) to happen.

    ‘he was doing what the saint willed’
    with clause ‘marijuana, dope, grass—call it what you will’
    • ‘To save the world, in this understanding, God willed the violent death of God's only beloved son.’
    • ‘But can empire be thrust upon a nation, whether it wills it or not?’
    • ‘May we be justice minded and peace-filled just as God wills it.’
    • ‘He chooses to do so not because he seeks to suffer or because God wills his death, but as the means to life for God's people.’
    • ‘Not for gain or glory, not for riches or immortality, but because my God wills it and that makes it right.’
    • ‘How, then, do we deal with the ‘outside’, with new things, the threat of somebody who wills our destruction?’
    • ‘Is it the case that a spell will not work if the person casting it consciously desires or wills the outcome?’
    • ‘And lastly, regarding the Constitution, the Conservative government will not make any changes unless the democratic process wills it.’
    • ‘From another angle, however, it is possible to argue that his premature death was willed by the state.’
    • ‘He attempts to refuse them passage, but Virgil reminds him that in Hell what God wills is done.’
    decree, order, ordain, command, direct
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1with object and infinitive Make or try to make (someone) do something or (something) happen by the exercise of mental powers.
      ‘reluctantly he willed himself to turn and go back’
      ‘she stared into the fog, willing it to clear’
      • ‘I feel that all the people who know and love me are willing me to be better and get well and take control.’
      • ‘I never imagined my sister would not reappear when I willed her to.’
      • ‘The Aussie admits that he left Essex on bad terms with several players, and they were surrounding him yesterday and willing him to fail.’
      • ‘It was even more disappointing yesterday because we could feel the fans getting behind us and willing us to win.’
      • ‘I just sat and nodded, not really understanding the full significance of this issue, willing her to go on.’
      • ‘I continued to stare at him, willing him to ask me out, but he never did.’
      • ‘I know how painful it was for the whole family to see her like this, and in the end it was a case of willing her to go, so that her pain would end.’
      • ‘He willed death to come quickly, with every ounce of strength he still possessed.’
      • ‘The crowd were willing him on but the goal never came.’
      • ‘We sat by Charlie's bed for five days, just willing him to wake up.’
      • ‘And don't forget that it is one of the most popular games of all time, so there will be more fans willing the movie not to fail.’
      • ‘But even as I willed my weary body into sleep, my mind did not cease to race with thoughts.’
      • ‘It is not terribly difficult to create in people the feeling that they have willed events that were not actually under their control.’
      • ‘With only one weekend left until Christmas, the major retailers are willing us all to indulge in a last-minute splurge of spending.’
      • ‘Apart from the stern-faced usherettes willing us out of their establishment, we were the only people left in the auditorium.’
      • ‘I stood at the bar and stared at the barman, willing him to come to me next.’
      • ‘Everyone was willing her to win a fortune and she did not let us down.’
      • ‘Edward allowed himself one gulp as he entered the chamber, and then willed his body not to betray his nervousness.’
      • ‘There was a large throng willing him on to success.’
      • ‘I can't help muttering under my breath, though, willing the hawk on.’
  • 2will something toBequeath something to (someone) by the terms of one's will.

    • ‘And unlike Graham, who named Protas as her sole heir, Balanchine willed his ballets to a number of heirs, including some of the ballerinas who created the roles in those ballets.’
    • ‘He willed the farm to Annie before lapsing into delirium and feverishly mumbling his last words in the Maori he knew so well.’
    • ‘In Renaissance Venice wives were free to bequeath their dowries to whom they willed, whereas in Florence they were required by law to leave them to their children or husband.’
    • ‘To Bentham, who willed his own body to the University of London, it was perfectly just to put the bodies of paupers to scientific use as a means of repaying their public debt.’
    • ‘Since all the peoples of the world are his heirs, and since presumably he willed the land to his heirs, then all the people of the earth own it.’
    • ‘If I should die before he is freed, the case will be willed to another attorney.’
    bequeath, leave, give, hand down, hand on, pass on, settle on, make over, transfer, gift
    View synonyms
    1. 2.1with clause Leave specified instructions in one's will.
      ‘he willed that his body be given to the hospital’
      • ‘When he died, he willed that all he had hidden down here be buried with him.’
      • ‘She had willed that after her death parts of her body be put on display or sent to those responsible for abusing animals.’

Phrases

  • at will

    • At whatever time or in whatever way one pleases.

      ‘it can be molded and shaped at will’
      ‘he was shoved around at will’
      • ‘Everyone in this film is going slowly insane, doing drugs, and killing at will.’
      • ‘But those with shopping to do and time budgets need to be able to put their buys in the car boot and return to the shops at will.’
      • ‘My freedom to roam at will conflicts with the farmer's need to make a living and to rear the crops and livestock we all need to exist.’
      • ‘If officials can take away peasants' land at will, what other civic rights would be left to them?’
      • ‘Suddenly United found themselves dominating possession and creating opportunities at will.’
      • ‘Anyway, I am beginning to settle into the house, now that I can enter and leave at will.’
      • ‘Since it can shut down oil production at will, it is a fight the union is likely to win.’
      • ‘The pack was very powerful and were cutting holes through their Galway opposition at will.’
      • ‘Few, if any, other counties possess such strong forwards who can switch positions at will.’
      • ‘That is why they give awards for acting, not for crying or laughing at will.’
      as one pleases, as one wishes, as one thinks fit, to suit oneself, at one's pleasure, at one's discretion, at one's inclination, at whim
      View synonyms
  • have a will of one's own

    • Have a willful character.

      • ‘One would almost be tempted to think that we have a will of our own.’
      • ‘Annoyed that her thoughts seemed to have a will of their own - something that rarely happened - Sahara flopped backwards into the center of her thick down comforter and closed her eyes in concentration.’
      • ‘But I don't have it down to an exact science, and sometimes they sort of have a will of their own.’
      • ‘This gentleman, Valmont, he comes and he goes as he pleases: has a will of his own.’
      • ‘Man was created to be free, to have a will of his own, and to make decisions about right vs. wrong.’
      • ‘Animals have always been put into a special category for the purpose of civil liability, for, unlike other chattels which may be the instrument in the commission of a tort, animals have a will of their own.’
      • ‘She needed to be strong, and have a will of her own.’
      • ‘But Curzon had a will of his own, and servant of the crown or no, he always got his way.’
      • ‘Sometimes, whenever we try bringing back the past in our presence, we fail as if our emotions have a will of their own.’
      • ‘She had no idea what she would do then, or where she would go, but the thoughts she had of walking away from all this seemed to grow, to have a will of their own.’
  • have one's will

    • archaic Obtain what one wants.

      • ‘Not only have the competitors had to lay down their gloves, as it were, to manipulate their own happy ending, but neither has emerged the clear victor, the comic hero who ‘has his will.’’
      • ‘At the end of her tale, she delivers a bit of wisdom that has yet to be improved upon: When it comes to love, ‘A woman will have her will.’’
  • if you will

    • Said when politely inviting a listener or reader to do something or when using an unusual or fanciful term.

      ‘imagine, if you will, a typical silversmith's shop’
      • ‘Imagine this scene if you will: a married couple in the throws of passion is interrupted by a man in a white mask.’
      • ‘Enjoy with me then, if you will, a fabulous piece of creative writing.’
      • ‘Consider for a moment, if you will, the exquisitely delicate hues of this astoundingly lovely tunicate.’
      • ‘Imagine, if you will, that you have the magical power to see two scenes ahead in a film.’
      • ‘Allow me, if you will, to give you a random sample of the goods, translated from the original German.’
      • ‘So with America firmly in mind, consider the final news item if you will.’
      • ‘Imagine, if you will, the ruins of an ancient abbey set in a secluded valley on the Kent / Sussex border.’
      • ‘What is your sense of the depth of the problem, if you will, and what can be done?’
      • ‘Imagine, if you will, what would happen if the concept were to be transferred to racing.’
      • ‘Just give it a try, if you will, and let me know how it goes in our next session.’
  • where there's a will there's a way

    • proverb Determination will overcome any obstacle.

      • ‘Take the man but don't lose hope, where there's a will there's a way.’
      • ‘But, as with anything else, where there's a will there's a way.’
      • ‘The problem for the fixtures board might be finding an alternative but where there's a will there's a way.’
      • ‘It seems to me that in politics, as in life, where there's a will there's a way.’
      • ‘As they say, where there's a will there's a way, and if anything can be read into Sunday's game, and its scintillating finish, the will is certainly strong in Galway and Kerry.’
      • ‘There would be a problem playing all those games but where there's a will there's a way.’
      • ‘It's complicated, and there's also tax implications, but where there's a will there's a way!’
      • ‘Rumour has it tickets are tight, but where there's a will there's a way.’
      • ‘This isn't easy, but as Jeff shows us, where there's a will there's a way.’
      • ‘I know it will be difficult but where there's a will there's a way.’
  • with the best will in the world

    • However good one's intentions (used to imply that success in a particular undertaking is unlikely although desired).

      • ‘But, with the best will in the world, we can't be in two places at once.’
      • ‘I have older children at home and even with the best will in the world, it is not always easy to find the time.’
      • ‘We are working flat out with all interested parties to try to make this work, but with the best will in the world, it will not be ready by September.’
      • ‘I don't think, with the best will in the world, that the staff are going to be able to clean it all up.’
      • ‘Even with the best will in the world, however, not all mentoring programmes work according to plan.’
      • ‘As it stands, the police are doing a tremendous job, but with the best will in the world, they don't have the legal expertise of lawyers.’
      • ‘And with the best will in the world, it is doubtful that the number of spaces will be increased so greatly as to compensate for this.’
      • ‘Against this it must be realised that accommodation is in very short supply and, with the best will in the world, we cannot always comply with every request.’
      • ‘Even with the best will in the world, the shortage of intensive care nurses will not be fixed overnight.’
      • ‘Understandably, they want their children to learn about their own pasts and cultural traditions in a way that, with the best will in the world, cannot be taught in a Scottish school.’
  • with a will

    • Energetically and resolutely.

      • ‘The brothers ate and drank with a will, and joked quietly between bites and gulps.’
      • ‘On the following day conditions were better and everyone set about striking camp with a will.’
      • ‘All had their parts to play and they did it with a will.’
      • ‘He found him eventually and saw them fighting, both hating each other with a fiery passion and both with a will.’
      • ‘He pulled down the overhead screen with a will and set up his visual.’
      • ‘His stomach snarled as he tore into it with a will.’
      • ‘But they battled with a will and defended sensibly to deny them a clear-cut opportunity.’
      • ‘It's easy work here on the flat, and he sets to with a will.’
      • ‘Paul stops scanning the banks for signs of wildlife and paddles with a will.’
      • ‘Then with a will, he forced himself to his feet and ran off.’

Origin

Old English willa (noun), willian (verb), of Germanic origin; related to Dutch wil, German Wille (nouns), also to will and the adverb well.

Pronunciation

will

/wil//wɪl/