Main definitions of wig in US English:

: wig1wig2

wig1

noun

  • A covering for the head made of real or artificial hair, typically worn by people for adornment or by people trying to conceal their baldness or in England by judges and barristers in courts of law.

    • ‘To show that it was a different kind of hearing, the judge and barristers took off their wigs, but kept on their court robes.’
    • ‘As the emotional heat turns up, they unlace their hearts and their consciences, shedding their wigs and letting their hair down.’
    • ‘Real hair wigs are definitely the better option for people who need a wig because of hair loss.’
    • ‘Some of the headsets have tiny, curled British barristers' wigs perched on top of them.’
    • ‘A nearby church offers the best in Catholic kitsch, statues of Our Lady wearing real clothes and wigs - one blond, one brunette.’
    • ‘Hair has stopped growing on most of her skull, and she wears a wig to cover her baldness.’
    • ‘Other measures will include judges taking off their wigs and gowns to make the courts look less intimidating when children are involved in cases.’
    • ‘Models sauntered along a catwalk sprinkled with black sequins wearing triangular crimped wigs and sporting ghostly white faces.’
    • ‘A thick braid of hair hung just above the bench's surface, looking more like a wig than real hair.’
    • ‘Most women now wear their hair too short for traditional hairstyles, so they wear wigs to go with ritual dress.’
    • ‘And now I find myself wanting to tell you about hair colour and wigs.’
    • ‘The best human hair wigs are made from European hair but, unfortunately, they cost a small fortune.’
    • ‘Forgetful guests across the country have left behind false eyeballs, wigs, and even artificial arms and legs.’
    • ‘As a sign of respect for the law and British custom, judges and lawyers during America's colonial period wore powdered wigs over their natural hair.’
    • ‘Britain's top judges and barristers traditionally wear wigs in their court appearances.’
    • ‘Human hair wigs can be restyled using heating devices, such as curling irons.’
    • ‘To avoid a weave that looks like a wig, take care not to add too much hair.’
    • ‘Pins that are used to penetrate hairpieces or wigs are often referred to as T-pin or wig hair pins.’
    • ‘Instead, use shampoos, conditioners and hairsprays specially formulated for synthetic wigs.’
    • ‘He had dirty blond hair that fit his face better than the black hair from the wig.’
    head of hair, shock of hair, mop of hair, mane
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Origin

Late 17th century: shortening of periwig.

Pronunciation

wig

/wiɡ//wɪɡ/

Main definitions of wig in US English:

: wig1wig2

wig2

verb

[with object]British
dated, informal
  • Rebuke (someone) severely.

    ‘I had often occasion to wig him for getting drunk’
    • ‘It was as the Daily Chronicle interviewer was leaving that Khama gently wigged him with humorous but earnest words of warning.’
    scold, chastise, upbraid, berate, castigate, lambaste, rebuke, reprimand, reproach, reprove, admonish, remonstrate with, lecture, criticize, censure
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Phrasal Verbs

  • wig out

    • Become deliriously excited; go completely wild.

      • ‘But the long and the short of it was that the baby boomer's father lit up and proceeded to wig out.’
      • ‘She seemed resigned rather than annoyed, and although I was wigging out at the thought of another month in my current state, what could I do?’
      • ‘It's because those organizations have discredited themselves by consistently siding against America and wigging out about fashionable lefty causes.’
      • ‘You've been wigged out ever since I got here, you're totally different!’
      • ‘He was totally wigging out, his head all wagging back and forth.’
      jubilant, thrilled, triumphant, delighted, exhilarated, happy, overjoyed, joyous, joyful, gleeful, cock-a-hoop, excited, animated, exulting, rejoicing, beside oneself with happiness, ecstatic, euphoric, elated, rapturous, in raptures, enraptured, rapt, walking on air, on cloud nine, on cloud seven, in seventh heaven, jumping for joy, in transports of delight, transported, carried away, in a frenzy of delight, delirious, delirious with happiness, hysterical, wild with excitement, frenzied
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Origin

Early 19th century: apparently from wig, perhaps from bigwig and associated with a rebuke given by a person in authority.

Pronunciation

wig

/wiɡ//wɪɡ/