Main definitions of wick in English

: wick1wick2wick3

wick1

noun

  • 1A strip of porous material up which liquid fuel is drawn by capillary action to the flame in a candle, lamp, or lighter.

    • ‘During this special time, all temples and some churches light lamps with wicks dipped in oil, and true religious solidarity is felt in an all-encompassing mood of cheerfulness and joy.’
    • ‘Not only did the increased movement of both air and oil to the wick enable the solar lamp to burn brighter, but higher priced oils like spermaceti were not required to achieve these advantageous results.’
    • ‘Carriages in the street used wax and wicks for their lamps.’
    • ‘We are running short of other items as well: wicks for candles, herbs and medicines, thread and yarn for mending, and nearly anything small, metal, and commonly-used.’
    • ‘Waving his right hand over the candle, the wick suddenly flickered, then formed into a flame, which lit his cold room.’
    • ‘The leaves are covered with a white, downy coating that, before the introduction of cotton to Britain, was used to make candle wicks.’
    • ‘Servants hurried around, replacing candles and oil and wicks.’
    • ‘One of them is preparing the candles - or, more precisely, oil lamps and wicks - that my wife lights before Shabbat arrives.’
    • ‘He took his lighter from his pocket and flicked it, and touched the small steady butane flame to the wick of the candle.’
    • ‘Inside, he found a teak-and-bamboo two-level serving cart, a set of candles and wicks, and a bamboo pitcher.’
    • ‘The wick of the candle is either made of a braided or twisted plant fibre (cotton or hemp) which is the safest to burn.’
    • ‘Once it is poured, it will come out only through the hole at the top of the lamp in which a wick is kept lighted.’
    • ‘From the colourful tiny candles bedecking birthday cakes to the ordinary white ones with long wicks, candles have not only served to dispel darkness, but also served as means to express love and affection.’
    • ‘The women well remember the regular job of filling lamps and trimming the wicks.’
    • ‘Primitive lamps, which relied on capillary action to deliver oil or melted fat up a wick to the flame, were improved only marginally in form and material over many centuries.’
    • ‘He would pour wax from one candle holder to another, dousing the wick in wax and putting out the flame, effectively eliminating the usability of that candle anytime in the near future.’
    • ‘Picking up a small match to light a candle, Mary hesitated before setting the fresh wick to flame.’
    • ‘Five wicks create a tall flame like a blow torch which makes a soft roaring noise.’
    • ‘Shortly a fire caught in the wick of the oil lamp and shed light through the tent.’
    • ‘In his hands he held a red candle with a wick that burned with a dancing flame.’
    candle, spill, night light
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1Medicine A gauze strip inserted in a wound to drain it.
      • ‘Once the external auditory canal has been cleansed as much as possible and a wick inserted if swelling is severe, topical antibacterial therapy should be started.’
      • ‘In these cases, the ear canal should be re-examined and cleansed every two to five days until edema of the canal has resolved and the wick is no longer needed.’
      • ‘Day after day, I nursed the wound, looking forward to healing, but pus continued to drain from the incision site, helped by the wick that I had thoughtfully inserted.’
      • ‘If swelling of the ear canal makes it difficult to give the drops, your child's doctor may insert a cotton wick into the canal to help carry the medicine inside the ear.’
      • ‘Frequent removal of debris from the ear is crucial; the wick will help.’

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • Absorb or draw off (liquid) by capillary action.

    ‘these excellent socks will wick away the sweat’
    no object ‘synthetics with hollow fibers that wick well’
    • ‘Cotton breathes and can be lightweight, but it isn't quick-drying and doesn't wick moisture away from the skin - cotton simply absorbs moisture.’
    • ‘Accordingly, the teaching of Meyer is to take a second layer which is to be capable of wicking the urine from the point of delivery over a wider area of the principal absorbent core.’
    • ‘The liner is very comfortable, with a soft, wicking fabric and self-molding foam.’
    • ‘Buy running clothing made from high-tech breathable fabric, which promotes cooling and reduces chafing by wicking moisture from the skin.’
    • ‘The more active enthusiasts may prefer wicking undergarments, technical fabrics, and rugged boots.’
    • ‘Both of these fabrics use the natural wicking ability of wool to pull moisture away from your body to keep you dry and comfortable.’
    • ‘The new race clothing utilizes moisture wicking fabrics for under layers and lightweight Lycra race suits.’
    • ‘Look for soft wicking materials in areas that make contact with your skin, and a belt that's wider at the back and tapered toward the front so as not to dig into the hips.’
    • ‘The viscose/rayon fibers help to wick exudate fluid laterally, maximizing the surface area for moisture vapor transfer.’
    • ‘They tend to hold moisture close to the skin, rather than wicking it away from the body.’
    • ‘The fabric's tightly woven fibers naturally wick perspiration and body vapor from the skin and absorb as much as 30 percent of their own weight in moisture.’
    • ‘Some modern fibres used in socks, such as polypropylene, can wick water away faster.’
    • ‘I don't want to hear my seat's too low, or corduroy isn't the best wicking fabric in the world.’
    • ‘Place pots in a shallow container and let them wick water from the bottom up.’
    • ‘Independent lab tests demonstrate the diapers have superior absorption speed, capacity, wicking ability and dryness when compared to major brands.’
    • ‘Both fabrics wick perspiration away from your skin while natural fibers like cotton and wool tend to get damp and clammy with sweat.’
    • ‘Dri-Release T-shirts and shorts from Soffe offer wearers quick-dry properties to wick perspiration away.’
    • ‘Moisture wicking fabrics will help evaporation and keep you cooler than heavier fabrics that retain heat.’
    • ‘Bubbles from an aquarium pump and absorbent paper to wick water up the sides served to increase the humidity.’
    • ‘Common brick is like a sponge, absorbing water and wicking moisture to the chimney interior.’

Phrases

  • dip one's wick

    • vulgar slang (of a man) have sexual intercourse.

Origin

Old English wēoce, of West Germanic origin; related to Dutch wiek and German Wieche ‘wick yarn’.

Pronunciation

wick

/wik//wɪk/

Main definitions of wick in English

: wick1wick2wick3

wick2

noun

  • 1(in place names) a town, hamlet, or district.

    ‘Hampton Wick’
    ‘Warwick’
    • ‘There are many, like myself, in the village that would like to apologise to the Cox's that such a thing should happen in Wick.’
    • ‘We are indeed neighbours of the Drs Cox's and residents of the beautiful village of Wick where our family can be traced to the 1760's.’
    • ‘The town of Wick is just a few miles south of John O'Groats.’
    • ‘The discount foodstore chain, which has stores in Thurso and Wick, are to hold an open day on Friday, June 24, to give the public the opportunity to discuss the proposed development and sample some of their products.’
    • ‘The Wick is Basildon's latest country park, covering 50 acres of former agricultural land.’
  • 2British dialect A dairy farm.

Origin

Old English wīc ‘dwelling place’, probably based on Latin vicus ‘street, village’.

Pronunciation

wick

/wik//wɪk/

Main definitions of wick in English

: wick1wick2wick3

wick3

adjective

Northern English
  • Quick, lively, or active.

    ‘Martha's approaching her century and as wick as a flea’
    • ‘‘It's as wick as you or me,’ he said; and Mary remembered that Martha had told her that ‘wick’ meant ‘alive’ or ‘lively.’’
    • ‘‘The girls are wick,’ Grace paused to say. ‘The girls are very, very wick. Don’t you wish you were as wick as we are?’’
    cheerful, cheery, happy, merry, jolly, joyful, gleeful, glad
    View synonyms

Origin

Mid 18th century: variant of quick.

Pronunciation

wick

/wɪk//wik/