Definition of whore in US English:

whore

noun

derogatory
  • 1A prostitute.

    • ‘Women have two kinds of power, historically: as the courtesan and as the whore.’
    • ‘In the streets he is accosted by whores, hustlers and queer-bashers.’
    • ‘In a matter of decades, Makiki's artistic focus had shifted from the virtues of the Madonna to the transgressions of the whore.’
    • ‘‘Most of the money was spent on booze and women of easy virtue - whores in other words,’ he told me in an interview.’
    • ‘Each room is occupied by girls like me, girls with broken homes; rape victims, prostitutes, and whores.’
    • ‘Sherman typically enacts a series of portraits - Elizabethan whores, gangster's molls, and now a series of clowns.’
    • ‘At the Bridewell in London, single women suspected of being whores were inspected by other women to establish if they were virgins.’
    • ‘The popular belief amongst local lads is that the inmates at the Magdalene are whores and trollops.’
    • ‘After learning that his son visits a whore, Wang Lung goes to the prostitute, paying her not to see his son anymore.’
    • ‘The waterfront was busy, traders and merchants displaying their items for sale, while on the corners of the streets hookers and whores waited for their evening's employment.’
    • ‘The whores in the brothel next door to my work are listening to REM's ‘Everybody Hurts’ on their radio.’
    • ‘He was also involved in a string of violent incidents with the swordsmen and whores of the Roman streets, ending with his killing of Ranuccio Tomassoni in a gang fight in May 1606.’
    • ‘A whore captivates a rich man with her coquettish prettiness and is rescued from life on the streets.’
    • ‘One woman reporter, in tears, told Weffer about being called a puta, a whore, when she tried to enter a poor neighborhood wearing a press pass.’
    • ‘From Kings to paupers, all of them had their mistresses and concubines and whores.’
    • ‘The album is content to rely on the old hip-hop cliches, piling on the swear words and overloading each track with references to whores, pimps, hookers and drugs.’
    • ‘He finally shed his obsession with cross-eyed prostitutes when he learned to put Descartes before the whores.’
    • ‘In this particular case, however, the child born to a whore is named after a particular adulterer.’
    prostitute, promiscuous woman, slut, sex worker, call girl, white slave
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 A woman who has many casual sexual encounters or relationships.
      • ‘We are clearly type cast: the bitch, the dimwit, the whore, and the gold-digger.’
      • ‘I was sickened by stereotypes of Indigenous women as promiscuous, drunken whores or sexless Mother Earth types.’
      • ‘She referred to them as sluts and whores where I was concerned.’
      • ‘He didn't need to surround himself with sluts and whores.’
      • ‘A girl does one thing, and is called a slut, a whore, and all of those recognizable titles, while guys could do whatever they want, and get praised.’
      • ‘Eder et al. found that middle school girls who initiated any type of sexual activity were labeled bitches, sluts, and whores.’
      • ‘If she were to go home and be kicked and beaten by an angry parent who called her a slut and a whore, would she even go to the doctor?’
      • ‘Most of the world disapproved of her, calling her a temptress and a whore.’
      • ‘She is often referred to as a whore and a harlot, for she is of lower class than both Desdemona and Emilia.’
      • ‘They just want to give off that image so they don't seem like sluts or whores.’
      • ‘She always called me a dirty whore, a slut, told me that I was ugly and she didn't know what he saw in me.’
      • ‘Come on, support your sisters, don't talk about being sluts and whores.’
      • ‘It felt good to have someone be on her side, and not think she was a slut or a whore.’
      • ‘Indeed, the character of Rosemarie Nitribitt can be simply defined as a one-note, golddigging whore and nothing more.’
      • ‘I was a tease and a whore, a flirt and a slut - I was horrible.’
      • ‘Blackburn magistrates heard that David Ainsworth was ranting and raving during the assault, calling his former wife a ‘slag, a whore and a slut’.’
      • ‘You could call her popular, you could call her the head chick, you could call her a bitch, a slut, or a whore, it did not really matter, just do not say it to her face.’
      • ‘She falls in love with John but he attacks her calling her whore and strumpet.’
      • ‘It's nice to know that deep down even German supermodels are still promiscuous whores.’
      • ‘Last time she had an actual conversation with this man, he had degraded her as a slut and a whore.’
    2. 1.2 A person who is regarded as willing to do anything to get a particular thing.
      ‘he's a shameless publicity whore’
      ‘you come across as a complete attention whore’

verb

[no object]
  • 1(of a woman) work as a prostitute.

    ‘she was forced to whore in order to support herself’
    with object ‘I whored myself in the streets’
    • ‘I bet you were whoring yourself to those old businessmen again.’
    • ‘That's because you've been whoring yourself so many times that we're all sick and tired of it.’
    • ‘These situations always require a compromise - it is up to you to decide how to take show off your best assets (superficial or not) without crossing the line into whoring yourself.’
    • ‘Was she always that forward or did she change after she whored herself to some man?’
    • ‘He finds out his mother has been whoring herself downtown just to put some excitement in her mundane life.’
    • ‘But she soon realizes that whoring herself has made her life a living hell.’
    • ‘It was like she took pride in whoring herself out.’
    • ‘Seventy five percent of our time together she was hysterically jealous, the other twenty five percent she was whoring.’
    • ‘She's the one who goes around whoring every other night.’
    • ‘With dullness and utilitarianism, they whore themselves out to men who no longer find the Batman and Robin relationship satisfying.’
    • ‘Yeah, do you see how Alexia is whoring herself to me?’
    • ‘Ironically, his wife turned out to be a bit of a cow, whoring herself out to the milkman, a handsome young Swede also called Fokken.’
    • ‘Even as I pulled the door shut Sherringham spoke again: ‘Or are you whoring yourself out now?’’
    • ‘I kept whoring myself out when I was still with him and he knew about it.’
    • ‘She pushed herself to new extremes as the emotionally stunted prostitute paying for her sick mother's care by whoring herself unsmilingly around New York.’
    • ‘Before she began whoring herself to the gentlemen of the area, she came here for a special blend of medicine.’
    • ‘‘At least I don't have to whore myself out to married men,’ he snapped back.’
    • ‘The news items I've seen indicate that most of the girls confess that they just wanted extra money for clothes, and whoring themselves to a few drooling middle-aged salarymen was the easiest way to get it.’
    • ‘I've been whoring myself to come up with the money for the drugs and I don't want to do that anymore.’
    • ‘He sees her whoring herself around a truck stop.’
    work as a prostitute, prostitute oneself, sell one's body, sell oneself, walk the streets, be on the streets, solicit, work in the sex industry
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1often as noun whoring (of a man) use the services of prostitutes.
      ‘he lived by night, indulging in his two hobbies, whoring and eating’
      • ‘Should I be worried that I've reached the point where immersing myself in this is more attractive than drinking and whoring my way around the bright city lights of King's Lynn?’
      • ‘David could be the bleakest character Allen has played, even more so than the pill-popping, whoring Harry.’
      • ‘A man who went whoring in Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region was surprised to discover that a woman made available to provide him with sexual services was his wife's sister.’
      • ‘He liked the young Miss and thought the way Master Charles went whoring around behind her back was awful.’
      • ‘Apparently, gambling, whoring, eating and walking around looking at Portuguese colonial ruins were the things to do then as well.’
      • ‘I was paging through some Arthur Schopenhauer, a brilliant, cantankerous, whoring son of this city.’
      • ‘George the Third is in his mad dotage, Napoleon is ploughing through Europe and Lord Byron is whoring his way to Greece.’
      • ‘I think we can safely draw from this that he was in our nation's fine capital checking up on his drug and whoring interests.’
      • ‘I wasn't even slightly surprised at Michael's whoring.’
      • ‘The grand irony in this, which was that he spent his own period of military service drinking and whoring around bars in Alabama, was rarely mentioned.’
      • ‘Especially when they're dressed as if they're about to go whoring downtown after the movie lets out.’
      use prostitutes
      View synonyms
    2. 1.2 Debase oneself by doing something for unworthy motives, typically to make money.
      ‘he had never whored after money’
      • ‘I spent a huge sum of money to become a Java programmer, and now I'm whoring myself out making balloon animals at bar mitzvahs.’
      • ‘Madonna is on the cover whoring herself out for the Gap in ugly pants, a tank top and ‘her own’ newsboy cap.’
      • ‘I've just seen her whoring herself for Asda.’
      • ‘Her pantomime career in England was flailing, and she had returned to Australia in the hope of whoring herself out for a bit of extra cash.’
      • ‘The scan was merely a common case of ‘student whoring his goods for money’.’
      • ‘Now he was forced into whoring himself to the system for the money because he was about to fall below the poverty line.’
      • ‘We didn't want to be viewed as one of those tired old bands who were whoring out their past for some fast cash.’
      • ‘It's a dusty relic of the days of empire when artists whored themselves by scribbling in the service of big business and the state.’
      • ‘He's a politician now, which means that bragging and whoring his story is the job description.’
      • ‘For well over a year, he has been whoring his military ‘experience’ to anyone who would listen.’

Phrases

  • the Whore of Babylon

    • derogatory, archaic The Roman Catholic Church.

      • ‘In any case, the Cathars believed that the Roman Catholic Church was corrupt - the Whore of Babylon they called it.’
      • ‘Others see it in a continuum of more old-fashioned American distaste for the Whore of Babylon that dwells in Rome, spinning Jesuitical plots.’
      • ‘And forget religious ecumenicalism, it still teaches that the Catholic Church is the Whore of Babylon, a satanic version of Christianity.’
      • ‘Those conservative Protestant leaders who agreed with Catholics on such questions were seldom disposed to cooperate publicly with a church that some still regarded as the Whore of Babylon.’
      • ‘In this, the Roman Church was revealed as the Whore of Babylon.’

Origin

Late Old English hōre, of Germanic origin; related to Dutch hoer and German Hure, from an Indo-European root shared by Latin carus ‘dear’.

Pronunciation

whore

/hɔr//hôr/