Definition of whoosh in US English:

whoosh

(also woosh)

verb

  • Move or cause to move quickly or suddenly with a rushing sound.

    no object, with adverbial of direction ‘a train whooshed by’
    ‘there was a loud whooshing noise’
    • ‘Every morning there is utter chaos at the school: children crying, parents shouting, instructors sighing, skiers and boarders whooshing past and mini buses weaving.’
    • ‘A black blur wooshed past us with frighteningly high speed.’
    • ‘I stopped talking, and relaxed in the cushy seat to hear the light whooshing sound of the train speeding along the track.’
    • ‘Instead I picked up a sandwich and cycled through Yoyogi Park, whooshing through the drifts of orange-brown leaves.’
    • ‘In 10 minutes, you are whooshed from the desert floor at 2,643 feet in elevation to Mt. San Jacinto State Park at 8,516 feet.’
    • ‘Back then, it was lazy weekends picnicking by - and whooshing down - the natural sandstone water chute at Slide Rock.’
    • ‘One of the persistent legends that attaches to Saville, is that, like the author Douglas Adams, he loves the sound of deadlines whooshing past.’
    • ‘Twisting and spinning up and down the rope, he whooshed a few feet above the audience's heads.’
    • ‘It was a wonderful car for wooshing down across the roads of Europe but it proved to be the very worst sort of vehicle for dirt-track roads.’
    • ‘It's nice to think of them picturing Father Christmas and his sleigh whooshing across frosty rooftops.’
    • ‘I looked up to dozens of cormorants whooshing softly overhead.’
    • ‘The water whooshed down the drain.’
    • ‘A kereru whooshed overhead this morning and a korimako was chiming from the branches of a nearby tree.’
    • ‘And the channel rail link wasn't even a dream then, but now runs through a cutting at the bottom of the village, with trains whooshing past every half hour of so.’
    • ‘A stream of people whooshed by, pulling me along in the darkness toward the bus stop.’
    • ‘And with that, he was gone, the door whooshing closed behind him.’
    • ‘The door whooshed open, and they ran into the corridor.’
    • ‘She smiled as she listened to the crickets in the tall grass nearby and the soft whooshing sound of the leaves swaying gently in the breeze above her.’
    • ‘The Hertfordshire countryside whooshes by in a smudge of muddy green and grey.’
    • ‘He felt his heart pumping, the blood whooshing inside his head.’
    be quick, hurry up, move quickly, go fast, hasten, make haste, speed, speed up, lose no time, press on, push on, run, dash, rush, hurtle, dart, race, fly, flash, shoot, streak, bolt, bound, blast, charge, chase, career, scurry, scramble, scamper, scuttle, sprint, gallop, go hell for leather, go like lightning
    View synonyms

noun

  • A sudden movement accompanied by a rushing sound.

    ‘there was a big whoosh of air’
    • ‘His breath came in short whooshes from brown cheeks.’
    • ‘I hate the delivery whoosh, but want the new mail ping.’
    • ‘He's gone in a whoosh, leaving the trio to dissect his speech.’
    • ‘Mrs. Williams took a deep breath and let it out in a whoosh.’
    • ‘There was a great whoosh, as if someone had agitated the can.’
    • ‘Most electronic music is still founded on blips, bleeps, whooshes, and other ‘spacey’ sounds.’
    • ‘With a whoosh, a machine on the hangar wall came to life.’
    • ‘I managed to open the door and about three seconds later it went up with a whoosh.’
    • ‘Jesse felt all his breath leave his body with a whoosh.’
    • ‘The grenade was sent on its way with a dull whoosh.’
    • ‘For maximum impact you must disperse speakers round the room, so that when Harry's broomstick zooms overhead, you will feel the whoosh.’
    • ‘Even the instrumental is all atmospheric whooshes and no concrete melodies.’
    • ‘The door opened and closed with a faint whoosh sound that surprised me.’
    • ‘Or is it a triple CD packed full of interminable electronic bleeps and whooshes, both inaccessible and incomprehensible?’
    • ‘There was a whoosh that sounded like a supersonic jet.’
    • ‘There's not a tinkle, whoosh, or rattle that isn't illustrative.’
    • ‘The next thing there was a dull thud and a whoosh.’
    • ‘All I catch is his name, Tim, and then he is off in a Lycra whoosh.’
    • ‘There was a whoosh, a sound like a thick book being shut, and a stranger walked through the closed closet door.’
    • ‘Incredible whooshes that sound like huge airliners amazingly turn out to be green-winged teals recorded from close range.’
    rustle, murmur, sigh, moan, sough, whoosh, whir, swish
    View synonyms

exclamation

  • Used to imitate a rushing movement and sound.

    • ‘No sooner do I lie him flat when, whoosh, he's on all fours again and crawling off at top speed.’
    • ‘I see his ministerial car waiting for him at 10 o'clock every night - whoosh, he is off into the night in his chauffeur-driven car!’
    • ‘‘The reaction was like whoosh,’ she says, waving her hands in front of her face.’
    • ‘But then I woke up at 7am and whoosh, the tidal wave that is my to-do list flooded my thoughts and blind panic swept over me once again.’
    • ‘Each black-belt spoke for five minutes, and then, whoosh, two or three hours were gone.’
    • ‘And whoosh, the first day of the week winds to a close.’
    • ‘John Howard won on his considerable strengths; he wasn't given an historic fourth term with a collective sigh but with an almighty whoosh!’
    • ‘You know in old movies, they'd have a calendar that used to go whoosh!’
    • ‘Turn your back for 5 minutes and whoosh, the sound of another policy announcement winging its way from Queen Anne's Gate.’
    • ‘Many people get the virus, don't have symptoms and - whoosh - it's gone.’
    • ‘And then, just when he has finished building a double-digit lead in the polls, whoosh!’
    • ‘‘It appears like that, but it is just the rapid flare-up of flame, whoosh, it just goes up,’ Gould said.’
    • ‘I don't want to have to go through all of that again… I just wanna have one slice in the belly and whoosh!’
    • ‘Luxembourg is also a bit don't sneeze or you'll miss it, we turned out of the airport and whoosh, we're in Germany.’
    • ‘Then, whoosh, they just up and disappeared again.’
    • ‘It lasted about 70 years and then, whoosh, it fell apart.’
    • ‘Heinze, 26, cost a shade under £7m during the summer, and then, whoosh, he vanished.’
    • ‘You can hear it slowly click on then, whoosh, full steam ahead.’
    • ‘The Cape Cod trip seems to have dislodged some old memories - they come crashing down, a bit like watching the polar caps give way, whoosh!’
    • ‘And just before the end, when it all seems to be going wrong… whoosh!’

Origin

Mid 19th century: imitative.

Pronunciation