Definition of whitelist in US English:

whitelist

noun

Computing
  • A list of people or things considered to be acceptable or trustworthy.

    ‘the software applies a blacklist of spammers and a whitelist of known good senders’
    • ‘Microsoft said yesterday it had introduced a white list scheme to allow well-behaved email marketing firms to reach its customers without falling foul of its spam filters.’
    • ‘Working with a California company called IronPort, Microsoft will create a white list of Internet marketers who have paid a fee and demonstrated that they have no record of spamming.’
    • ‘When I deal with vendors/companies/governments I take the few minutes to enter them into the white list.’
    • ‘If there is a white list such as AOL, how does one get his company on it?’
    • ‘I took down my challenge/response system filters so that anyone who is not a SPAMMER can get through to me without having to be on my white list.’
    • ‘Once you get to the point where you have 10 unsolicited commercial voicemail messages every time you log on people will stop using it or at least only accept calls from people on their white list.’
    • ‘The technology uses a mixture of blacklist rules, white lists (for known good applications) and stateful tracking to protect systems.’
    • ‘He was supportive generally of a so-called white list of countries from which people could not claim to need asylum.’
    • ‘It is a good solution that does not depend on white lists.’
    • ‘In these cases, the use of white lists that pre-authorize e-mail from certain source addresses is desirable.’
    • ‘It's been in place for ages now, it's just that certain people on an utterly illogical white list have been exempt.’
    • ‘Key benefits of the white list approach are that it prevents intrusion, internally or externally and is simpler, cheaper and more effective than the detect and repair approach required of AV and other blacklist solutions.’
    • ‘E-mail recipients could decide to only accept mail from people they already know - so called white lists - but those solutions are available and effective today.’
    • ‘If you're on my white list then your message will get through with no hassles.’
    • ‘There is a list of the basic licensing conditions which will be entitled to exemption, a white list of other permissible clauses, and a black list of impermissible clauses.’
    • ‘The Tech support has been incredible but the problem still remains that anyone emailing me from abroad that I haven't added to the white list will not get through.’
    • ‘This includes a list of ingredients that are not permitted, as opposed to the white list that focuses on a very substantial list of things that are permitted.’
    • ‘Let me know if this blocks you and I will put it in the white list.’
    • ‘Signing up to white lists and setting tighter firewall parameters is just the beginning of a massive change in the way organisations use and manage email.’
    • ‘The so-called white list accepts e-mail only from a list of approved contacts.’

verb

[with object]Computing
  • Put on a whitelist.

    ‘it is not possible to whitelist specific users based on their email address or domain name’
    • ‘Reviewing your Graymail is important when you first begin using SpamAssassin, and if you find any messages improperly captured, you can deliver and white list those senders.’

Origin

Mid 19th century: from white + list on the model of blacklist.

Pronunciation

whitelist

/ˈ(h)wītˌlist/