Definition of white dwarf in English:

white dwarf

noun

Astronomy
  • A small very dense star that is typically the size of a planet. A white dwarf is formed when a low-mass star has exhausted all its central nuclear fuel and lost its outer layers as a planetary nebula.

    • ‘In the early 1930s Subrahmanyan Chandrasekhar showed that white dwarfs can have a maximum mass of 1.4 solar masses.’
    • ‘Could they be red giant stars, white dwarfs, or neutron stars?’
    • ‘Stars like our sun form white dwarfs, but those about 1.5 times heavier become supernovas and collapse to form a neutron star.’
    • ‘Stellar remnants such as white dwarfs, neutron stars, and black holes will remain.’
    • ‘A type Ia occurs when a white dwarf, an aging star about the size of the earth but with the same mass as the sun, accretes too much matter from a companion star and implodes under the gravitational pressure.’
    • ‘Almost as interesting will be watching smaller objects - neutron stars, smaller black holes, white dwarfs, and ordinary stars - falling into a supermassive black hole at a galaxy's center.’
    • ‘The planet, more than twice the size of Jupiter, orbits two stars, a pulsar and a white dwarf that linked together about a billion years ago.’
    • ‘But quantum theory said that there is a way to make a star denser than a white dwarf.’
    • ‘While outer layers are blown away, the resulting collapsed core will result in either of a white dwarf, a neutron star, or a black hole, depending on its final mass.’
    • ‘Experts on very compact white dwarfs, neutron stars, and black holes study the enormously energetic and fascinatingly rich array of phenomena that these systems exhibit.’
    • ‘Scientists especially want to know more about what happens to atomic nuclei under the extreme physical conditions that can exist on earth in accelerators, or in white dwarfs, neutron stars, and other exotic objects in the cosmos.’
    • ‘Even the degenerate stars - the white dwarfs and neutron stars - are simple, though in a different way because so much of their matter exists in an ideal extreme form (as a Fermi gas).’
    • ‘If the clump is really there, it may come from nuclear burning inside the exploding white dwarf, or it may come from the companion star.’
    • ‘Both white dwarfs and neutron stars are also compact enough, with a strong enough gravitational pull, to strip matter from a companion and pull it on to themselves, creating hot spots that radiate at X-ray wavelengths.’
    • ‘The companion star of this system is a white dwarf roughly the size of the earth.’
    • ‘These sources have been attributed to white dwarfs, neutron stars and black holes.’
    • ‘This process also stabilizes white dwarfs and neutron stars against gravitational collapse.’
    • ‘As these stars used up their fuel, they would eventually contract and cool as white dwarfs or explode as supernovae (sometimes forming black holes).’
    • ‘The heavier elements we see in the world today were all ejected from stars that had reached the end of their lifespan and exploded into supernovas before settling into old age as a white dwarf, a neutron star or a black hole.’
    • ‘Sifting through these observations, they were able to detect the white dwarf orbiting the pulsar and measure its color and temperature.’

Pronunciation:

white dwarf

/ˌ(h)wīt ˈdwôrf/