Definition of white coat in English:

white coat

noun

  • A long white protective garment worn by doctors, hospital attendants, and laboratory workers.

    • ‘Young people don't want to hear about health information from a man in a white coat.’
    • ‘The reason why you often see men and women in white coats in soap powder and cosmetics ads is because the marketing folk believe we see scientists as sources of authority.’
    • ‘When he came to, he was surrounded by people in white coats and he thought he was looking death in the eye.’
    • ‘A doctor in a white coat may be seen as a credible endorser of a new headache tablet.’
    • ‘Doctors are no longer remote gods of the white coat but increasingly hassled and fallible human beings.’
    • ‘I started my third year of medical school, when students rotate through the different specialties, crisp white coats venturing into the grime of clinical medicine.’
    • ‘Nurses and doctors in white coats were running in and out of rooms, while still trying to maintain quiet around the waiting room.’
    • ‘The boffins in white coats talk as if this huge, multi-million dollar machine is the mother of all video games.’
    • ‘When I began this book I thought scientists had no emotional life, they were men and women in white coats.’
    • ‘After the person in the mirror, the next most dangerous individual we're ever likely to encounter is one in a white coat.’
    • ‘Medical students from a Rome teaching hospital bicycled through the capital wearing their white coats and stethoscopes to protest against the cuts in spending on research.’
    • ‘Mom or dad held you on his or her lap while the doctor, wearing a white coat and Cheshire cat grin, pierced your poreless, silken skin with a needle full of weird stuff.’
    • ‘In earlier times religion was a major force, but today many people find a white coat more reassuring than a black one, a medical center more impressive than a cathedral.’
    • ‘Doctors abroad are giving up their traditional white coats and ties as they could harbour infections.’
    • ‘The irony is that in the transition from a religiously inspired world where men in black frocks held sway, our world is now more likely to be informed by scientists in white coats.’
    • ‘Some may even ask whether he is a doctor at all, for he was wearing neither a stethoscope nor a white coat, and his handwriting is said to be legible.’
    • ‘The white coat of one of the medics is spattered with blood.’
    • ‘She is a natural listener and it is easy to imagine her in a white coat with a stethoscope in her pocket, dispensing sympathy and stern wisdom at the bedside.’
    • ‘He looked up to see a doctor in a long white coat walking towards him.’
    • ‘Technicians in white coats, latex gloves, and hairnets walk the halls and move about the lab purposefully.’