Definition of whicker in English:

whicker

verb

[NO OBJECT]
  • 1Utter a half-suppressed laugh; snigger; titter.

    ‘a half-loony whicker of nerves’
    • ‘The fourth horse in, Rocky, a middle-aged blood bay, whickered his greeting.’
    • ‘Even Buck shed his annoyance and whickered his concern.’
    1. 1.1 (of a horse) give a soft breathy whinny.
      ‘the palomino whickered when she saw him and stamped her foreleg’
      • ‘The horse whickered at Tomias, nudging him gently.’
      • ‘The horse whickered and shook her head, sending Keegan flying through the air.’
      • ‘The horse whickered a soft greeting as he drew near her stall.’
      • ‘She heard horses whickering softly in a nearby stable, owned by Master and Mistress Kaelseen, if she remembered correctly.’
      • ‘The gelding whickered nervously at his approach, drawing back several paces, stomping the grasses with his hooves.’
      • ‘The sound of a horse whickering drifted from somewhere in the distance.’
      • ‘Even the mare whickered softly at the growing chaos around them.’
      • ‘The horse whickered gently under his breath and Lon smiled.’
      • ‘The mare whickered at her, but the girl didn't stop.’
      • ‘The mare whickered and gently bumped her head against her chest.’
      • ‘She gasped and the horse whickered, stamping its hooves against the earth nervously.’
      • ‘The horse whickered softly and blew into her ear.’
      • ‘The horse threw her head up and whickered, tossing her braided mane as she did so.’
      • ‘The horse whickered softly, as if unsure of the man who approached him.’
      • ‘Horses whickered and starting at some noise or piece of flapping cloth.’
      • ‘She drove her heels hard into the mare's sides, and the horse whickered and plunged out of the madness.’
  • 2Move with a sound as of something hurtling through or beating the air.

    ‘the soft whicker of the wind flowing through the July corn’

noun

  • 1A snigger; a soft, breathy whinny.

    • ‘His horse grazed contentedly in the small paddock fenced with rough hewn branches, but Gregory ignored the animal's expectant whicker.’
    • ‘All the furniture in the sunroom was white whicker with pink satin cushions.’
  • 2The sound of something beating the air.

Origin

Mid 17th century (in the sense to snigger, titter): imitative.

Pronunciation:

whicker

/ˈ(h)wikər/