Definition of whammy in English:

whammy

noun

informal
  • 1An event with a powerful and unpleasant effect; a blow.

    ‘the third whammy was the degradation of the financial system’
    See also double whammy
    • ‘The final whammy is the twisted bowel operation.’
    • ‘Scottish Natural Heritage is facing a triple whammy of objections which are to be lodged with the Scottish parliament calling for an investigation into the activities of the conservation quango.’
    • ‘‘When you have people who have a diet that's very high in animal fat, they get the full whammy of the contaminants,’ said David Carpenter, who supervised the St. Lawrence Island studies.’
    • ‘Shazia, growing up in the United Kingdom, faced the triple whammy of being Asian, Muslim and female.’
    • ‘York Wasps suffered a triple whammy yesterday as the big winter freeze put paid to the New Year's Day clash against Swinton Lions.’
    • ‘Mr Denham's departure was the third blow of a triple whammy that saw Leader of the House Robin Cook and two junior ministers, including Mr Denham, quit their jobs.’
    • ‘This extremely talkative Plateau-born downtown resident has been putting the hypnosis whammy on people for over 50 years now.’
    • ‘Maumere Bay is slowly recovering from a triple whammy: earthquake, tidal waves and a cyclone.’
    • ‘But there can't be recovery if we triple and quadruple whammy these reefs.’
    • ‘The quadruple whammy is hitting winemakers like a 10-ton barrel.’
    • ‘He said: ‘This is very much a triple whammy for the motorist and even a quadruple whammy if you happen to drive a diesel-powered vehicle.’’
    • ‘But then the organisers came in with a whammy that left the undefeated team and its supporters scratching their heads!’
    • ‘The dinosaurs, they say, were killed not by a lone asteroid strike but by the quadruple whammy of global climate change, massive volcanism, and not one but two gigantic collisions.’
    • ‘Discrete little chunks of Thursday, that weren't goo-worthy in themselves, seem to have joined forces in the night and put the goo whammy on me this morning.’
    • ‘So this week I've had the triple whammy of being busy, edgy and suddenly noticing a few people around seem to be looking unexpectedly good.’
    • ‘They have to think of one policy package and strategy to stop the triple whammy of falling stocks, bonds and the yen.’
    • ‘The triple whammy of destruction greatly increases chances of developing an ‘age-related’ eye disease.’
    • ‘Playing the what-if game, the U.S. could face a quadruple whammy if OPEC stops cheating and Venezuela doesn't get its act together and a war disrupts Middle Eastern oil and we get a very cold winter.’
    • ‘It had a triple whammy of problems: poor content, latencies and content not suitable for the format, as well as a bad UI.’
    • ‘Our economy suffered a triple whammy this year - we were hit by Sars, the Iraq war, and then the world economic downturn.’
    shock, surprise, bombshell, bolt from the blue, bolt out of the blue, thunderbolt, jolt, rude awakening
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1US An evil or unlucky influence.
      ‘I've come to put the whammy on them’
      • ‘Using 11 ‘magical crystals’ and a giant crystal ‘to receive and transmit positive thoughts,’ Geller put the whammy on the opposition.’

Origin

1940s: from the noun wham + -y; associated from the 1950s with the comic strip Li'l Abner, in which the hillbilly Evil-Eye Fleagle could “shoot a whammy” (put a curse on somebody) by pointing a finger with one eye open, and a double whammy with both eyes open.

Pronunciation

whammy

/ˈ(h)wamē/