Main definitions of weld in English

: weld1weld2

weld1

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • 1Join together (metal pieces or parts) by heating the surfaces to the point of melting using a blowtorch, electric arc, or other means, and uniting them by pressing, hammering, etc.

    ‘the truck had spikes welded to the back’
    • ‘The fuselage was of welded steel tube truss construction and was quite stout.’
    • ‘He was handcuffed to a metal desk that was welded to the floor.’
    • ‘Then he wanted to make a mortar, so he welded a steel plate onto the end of a scaffolding pipe.’
    • ‘Accordingly, the bottom of the bucket is cut out and replaced with new steel plate, welding it into position.’
    • ‘Such torches are used to cut through metals and to weld two metals to each other.’
    • ‘I first welded flat sheet metal to the top of the unit.’
    • ‘The workers rapidly busy themselves welding the pieces together.’
    • ‘They can weld all metals from aluminum to stainless steel, plus they stock parts and supplies for sale.’
    • ‘The artist was seen welding bits of metal together.’
    • ‘A metal ring is welded onto the power shaft beside the universal joint.’
    • ‘These steels are usually welded by the gas tungsten arc or the gas metal arc welding process.’
    • ‘Almost all metals can be welded with the electron beam welding process.’
    • ‘He told police that the fire erupted when they were welding new metal roof beams in place at the restaurant.’
    • ‘The electron beam welding process has had wide application for joining dissimilar metals.’
    • ‘The two sides aren't welded, but they snap together.’
    • ‘We still stamp steel panels, weld them together, drop in an engine, bolt on the wheels, and stuff it with seats and fabrics.’
    • ‘His solution was to remove the part, and have a metal shop weld a small reinforcement to the post.’
    • ‘The two metals are welded together under heat and pressure.’
    fuse, unite, bond, connect, stick, join, link, attach, bind, seal, amalgamate, knit, splice, meld, melt, blend, solder, cement, glue, gum, paste
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1Forge (an article) by welding.
      • ‘It could take a while, because it takes a long time to weld together a hundred trailer homes.’
      • ‘He rushed into the kitchen where a metal coat rack, which was a piece given to Nick from a friend who welded marvelous art pieces, stood.’
    2. 1.2Unite (pieces of plastic or other material) by melting or softening of surfaces in contact.
  • 2Cause to combine and form a harmonious or effective whole.

    ‘his efforts to weld together the religious parties ran into trouble’
    • ‘But only a clear political perspective can weld together this broad opposition into an effective political movement.’
    • ‘The effect was to weld moral and political science into a new social science.’
    • ‘His arms clung to Roselyn's hips, their bodies welded together.’
    • ‘Whitman emerged a mature poet, ready to weld together the nation that had survived.’
    • ‘Days melted together, welded by the redundant routine of tears and emptiness.’
    • ‘It was, however, in the second act, when Mr Luscombe welded his somewhat disparate cast into a coherent and effective whole, that his skill as a director became apparent.’
    • ‘The extraordinary range of vessels shows him as a generous host, welding alliances while softening visiting dignitaries with games, drink and music.’
    • ‘Sven could be the man capable of welding the parts into a world-beating whole.’
    • ‘Singing together, dancing, even listening to the same music can help weld individuals into a team, a village, a nation.’
    • ‘How to weld these bureaux into a united and effective inspection system is still under consideration.’
    • ‘They've tried to weld a couple of numbers onto a dodgy story, and they've done it with performers who can act.’
    • ‘The director's vision must embrace myth and reality, welding them into a seamless whole.’

noun

  • A welded joint.

    • ‘Since engineers rule the world, it's not surprising they claim they've got a solution to everything including the best alternative to welds, nuts, rivets and bolts.’
    • ‘Resistance welding is used to join titanium and titanium alloy sheet by either spot welds or continuous seam welds.’
    • ‘The weaker parts generally tend to be the welds, particularly at flange joints.’
    • ‘The extra welds add cost but create a stiffer structure.’
    • ‘They are getting a better understanding of the fundamentals of the process, such as the appropriate control parameters for good welds.’
    • ‘Among the advantages of friction welding is the ability to produce high quality welds in a short cycle time.’
    • ‘This system not only allows several welds to be done simultaneously, it also reduces weld time from three seconds for a conventional spot weld, to just half a second.’
    • ‘Erectors assembled the trusses with bolts instead of welds because of the threat of fire.’
    • ‘Optical examination instruments produced by the company are used in industry to check the quality of everything from fuel injector nozzles to interior welds.’
    • ‘However, hydrogen has almost no solubility in solid aluminum and it has been determined to be the primary cause of porosity in aluminum welds.’
    • ‘During installation the sections are welded to the posts at the jobsite, and these welds are then touched up with primer and paint.’
    • ‘The rails are of cast iron and contain hundreds and hundreds of individual welds, which all had to be fitted by a team of craftsman inside the property as it was being built.’
    • ‘Several vendors are working to improve the throughput of laser-welding machines and the process of reducing stress in the welds.’
    • ‘This process is quite common for making welds for making watertight joints for tanks, etc.’
    • ‘Although the Tridents have never been into a refit, there would have been similar checks on welds during construction at Barrow.’
    • ‘On closer inspection it's hollowed out with no internal welds.’
    • ‘Some bolted connections had to be switched to welds.’
    • ‘He is responsible for teaching students how to properly take X-rays of welds to ensure they will stand up to underwater stress.’

Origin

Late 16th century (in the sense become united): alteration (probably influenced by the past participle) of well in the obsolete sense melt or weld (heated metal).

Pronunciation:

weld

/weld/

Main definitions of weld in English

: weld1weld2

weld2

noun

  • 1A widely distributed plant related to mignonette, yielding a yellow dye.

    1. 1.1The yellow dye made from the weld plant, which has been used since Neolithic times and was a popular color for Roman wedding garments.

Origin

Late Middle English: related to Dutch wouw, perhaps also to wold.

Pronunciation:

weld

/weld/