Definition of weird in US English:

weird

adjective

  • 1Suggesting something supernatural; uncanny.

    ‘the weird crying of a seal’
    • ‘I have managed to unearth yet more weird and almost unbelievable tales from this strange civilisation.’
    • ‘In a weird turn of fate, the library conference I am going to is walking distance from his house in Adelaide.’
    • ‘It was a weird twist of fate that threw us together, tore us apart, and threw us back together again.’
    • ‘Then, at midday, a weird sound came over the flat water - a mysterious, whale-like noise.’
    • ‘‘Well, let's keep going and keep an eye out for anything weird,’ suggested Celine.’
    • ‘At that moment we came around a bend and heard a weird sound.’
    • ‘Sounds emitted from the bushes: weird uncanny sounds made by unknown animals, for all sorts of things lived in forests.’
    • ‘Thousands of people have experienced mysterious lights and weird sounds above the ancient fort at Cley Hill during the past 40 years.’
    • ‘A weird supernatural calamity has thrust part of Japan up into the air like a tower.’
    • ‘I know this is crazy, but I honestly feel that there was some kind of weird connection there.’
    • ‘It was a long forgotten detail connected to her weird visions.’
    • ‘By some weird act of fate, every single photograph she had of him had been destroyed in a fire that irreparably damaged her home, exactly one year after it had all happened.’
    • ‘The team has been connected to some weird incidents this summer.’
    • ‘But things work out for the best sometimes, and fate acts in weird ways.’
    • ‘I heard some kind of weird sound that came from the sea.’
    • ‘It was called the ‘Black Hole’ and was as dark and weird as its name suggests.’
    • ‘Erin was about to say something when the weird bell sounded again and the students filed onto the field, and all at the same time, stopped and looked over to the cameras.’
    uncanny, eerie, unnatural, preternatural, supernatural, unearthly, other-worldly, unreal, ghostly, mysterious, mystifying, strange, abnormal, unusual
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    1. 1.1informal Very strange; bizarre.
      ‘a weird coincidence’
      ‘all sorts of weird and wonderful characters’
      • ‘Contact lenses are a bit weird, you can't really feel them but you're aware that they're there.’
      • ‘He enjoyed mixing traditional pop sounds with weird instruments like the French Horn.’
      • ‘Isn't it a bit weird, conducting an imaginary interview with yourself, on a blog already devoted to furthering your growing egomania?’
      • ‘I think we're good together - I think you're a bit weird.’
      • ‘The weather does seem to have become a little weird lately.’
      • ‘All around the city there were street parties, family fun days and a mass of weird and wonderful events all specifically designed for people to have fun and help a very worthy cause.’
      • ‘Going home last weekend was a bit weird; it no longer feels like ‘home’ as I've probably not spent much more than a month there in the last two and a bit years.’
      • ‘Nevertheless, the story strikes me as a little weird.’
      • ‘Now that it's all over, I feel exhausted and a little weird.’
      • ‘I love that I can experience different, strange, weird and wonderful things wherever I go.’
      • ‘Hundreds of bargain hunters flocked to Leeds at the weekend to snap up the uniquely weird and wonderful outfits being sold by Opera North's costume department.’
      • ‘The astronomers realised that a normal red supergiant alone could not have given rise to such a weird supernova.’
      • ‘To tell the truth it's a bit weird being out here on my own.’
      • ‘It is a bit weird to phone her up out of the blue and just ask her out, unless you look like Brad Pitt that is!’
      • ‘He does a weird pantomime suggesting a dance, his hands making pinching motions in the air.’
      • ‘The atmosphere was a little weird to put it mildly.’
      • ‘We're going to see some fairly weird and wonderful looking footwear.’
      • ‘I don't wear lenses normally, so it was a bit weird putting something in my eye and, like, leaving it there.’
      bizarre, offbeat, quirky, outlandish, eccentric, unconventional, unorthodox, idiosyncratic, surreal, crazy, absurd, grotesque, peculiar, odd, curious, strange, queer, cranky, freakish, insane, zany, madcap, off-centre, far out, alternative
      View synonyms
    2. 1.2archaic Connected with fate.

noun

Scottish
archaic
  • A person's destiny.

verb

[with object]weird someone out
North American
informal
  • Induce a sense of disbelief or alienation in someone.

    • ‘Let's ignore for a moment the fact that it is my 28th Birthday today, and that I am completely weirded out by that.’
    • ‘I do miss him, and I'm a little angry that all my friends (okay, so my friend) refused to come because she was too weirded out.’
    • ‘I am receiving SMS's and phone calls (which I am not answering) that are completely weirding me out.’
    • ‘I'm thirty-seven, but I really feel, and behave like I'm twenty-five. Then I'm weirded when I'm reminded.’
    • ‘If you're weirded out by it, you don't have to go inside.’
    • ‘I think they'd both be really weirded out by the thought.’
    • ‘I've been speaking only when absolutely necessary and I know I'm weirding some people out and confusing others.’
    • ‘It's so… well… to be completely honest with you… I'm completely weirded out by it.’
    • ‘‘Yeah, I'm totally weirded out by this,’ Davies answered.’
    • ‘It still weirded me out that Sandie had been right about Paul and I.’
    • ‘They weirded me out, but they were interesting.’
    • ‘If things work out with Colin… you're not going to be weirded out because I'm dating your brother, are you?’
    • ‘‘My mother was really weirded out at first when I began competing,’ laughs Blair.’
    • ‘Oh, and if anyone was weirded out by the last installment, don't be.’
    • ‘The more I think about this, the more I'm weirded out by Mary.’
    • ‘But it's hard for Marina, who's clearly weirded out by this place.’
    • ‘I felt that everyone would laugh, stare, or be weirded out.’
    • ‘Yeah, and it's totally weirding me out to think about having a client come to my house.’
    • ‘Trust me; no one is more weirded out by this than me.’
    • ‘… ok, I'm seriously weirding myself out right now.’

Origin

Old English wyrd ‘destiny’, of Germanic origin. The adjective ( late Middle English) originally meant ‘having the power to control destiny’, and was used especially in the Weird Sisters, originally referring to the Fates, later the witches in Shakespeare's Macbeth; the latter use gave rise to the sense ‘unearthly’ (early 19th century).

Pronunciation

weird

/wɪrd//wird/