Main definitions of weave in English

: weave1weave2

weave1

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • 1 Form (fabric or a fabric item) by interlacing long threads passing in one direction with others at a right angle to them.

    ‘linen was woven in the district’
    • ‘When woollen cloth was woven on a handloom the nap had to be combed in order to raise it.’
    • ‘The tapestry is woven in wool on linen warps and contains details in silk, gold and silver.’
    • ‘The other main form of visual art is silk and cotton woven cloth with elaborate and subtle patterns and colors.’
    • ‘No one weaves their own cloth these days either, do they?’
    • ‘Every young girl was supposed to be able to weave cloth and do elaborate embroidery.’
    • ‘A roughly woven cloth was wrapped around his narrow hips and was barely long enough to keep him decent.’
    • ‘Cloth is woven from wild silk and from locally grown cotton.’
    • ‘A machine for weaving cloth, programmed by a punched card, had already been perfected by the end of the 18th century by Jacquard, whose name is now a dictionary word.’
    • ‘In 1782, Watt developed a rotary engine that could turn a shaft and drive machinery to power the machines to spin and weave cotton cloth.’
    • ‘Two of the most prestigious silk cloths are also woven on looms fitted with a flying shuttle.’
    • ‘Craftspeople spin cotton fabrics and weave strips of cloth that are sewn together to make durable garments.’
    • ‘Villagers then filtered out the sediment by pouring the water through tightly woven cloth.’
    • ‘Women habitually baked bread, churned butter, brewed beer, sewed clothes, knitted stockings, spun yarn, and even sometimes milled flour and wove cloth.’
    • ‘In 1851, George Hemshall received the Prince Albert Medal for weaving a seamless linen shirt.’
    • ‘Where privacy is a concern, invest in lighter curtain fabrics such as lightly woven linens or cottons that have a high degree of translucence.’
    • ‘I was given a sewing machine so I could make my own clothes and I was given a small loom so I used to weave cloth, I was that sort of child.’
    • ‘Call me lazy, but I don't really want to grow my own cotton, spin my own thread, weave my own cloth, and sew a shirt out of it.’
    • ‘Wear shirts made from tightly woven cloth, like long-sleeved cotton T-shirts.’
    • ‘Both houses had hearths and ovens, and one had an upright loom for weaving cloth.’
    • ‘In the cotton industry, for example, most firms either spun yarn or wove cloth, which was in turn sent to an independent dyer and finisher.’
    entwine, lace, work, twist, knit, interlace, intertwine, interwork, intertwist, interknit, twist together, criss-cross, braid, twine, plait
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1Form (thread) into fabric by interlacing.
      ‘some thick mohairs can be difficult to weave’
      • ‘Unfortunately, the only source of material for clothing is human hair, which can be woven into clothing.’
      • ‘The cloth was very strange; it was like moss and leaves that had been somehow woven together.’
      • ‘If you spin or weave you often have other interests such as looking after sheep or giving lessons.’
      • ‘It is an inexpensive fiber from an East Asian plant and can be spun or woven into a fabric.’
      • ‘She stood frozen, gazing at the sheer beauty of the dress, each thread intricately woven to create perfection.’
    2. 1.2[no object]Make fabric by interlacing threads on a loom.
      ‘cotton spinning and weaving was done in mills’
      • ‘In addition, they would engage in spinning, knitting, weaving, and taking care of the farm animals.’
      • ‘Aside from the addition of a few automated looms, the weaving, dyeing and finishing of fabric strips is still similar now to how it was then.’
      • ‘There will be demonstrations and exhibitions of Ruskin lace, spinning and weaving, wood-turning and many others.’
      • ‘Not far beyond them, a young woman was weaving on a loom.’
      • ‘After the normal classes the students will be encouraged to do activities such as traditional arts, sports, fishing, weaving and cooking, she says.’
      • ‘Bradford textile mills have 450 vacant jobs for full-time women workers in spinning, weaving, twisting, winding, roving and burling and mending.’
      • ‘There will be an introduction to a wide range of techniques, including demonstrations of felt-making, braiding, and tapestry weaving.’
      • ‘The graphs commonly available for cross stitch and other crafts like knitting and crochet can be used in weaving to create patterns in cloth.’
      • ‘Traditional crafts among the Acadians include knitting and weaving.’
      • ‘The organisation has spread its wings to encompass various fields from bakery to jute handloom weaving.’
    3. 1.3Make (a complex story or pattern) from a number of interconnected elements.
      ‘he weaves colorful, cinematic plots’
      • ‘Ryan has also made a film called Against the Ropes - a fictional tale woven around the true story of female boxing promoter Jackie Kallen.’
      • ‘It is a novel woven with complex images of politics, leaders, freedom fighters and their lives.’
      • ‘The reason for this, I think, is that Mitchell simply manages to weave such a compelling story.’
      • ‘These individuals have vivid imaginations, love to weave stories and tales, and are prone to exaggeration.’
      • ‘Interestingly, the script has been woven from true stories of women interviewed by Naomi.’
      • ‘She weaves a fantastic visual tale of her surroundings that she constantly interacts with.’
      • ‘She has woven a complex narrative of hope and danger in the city that was destined to be the beacon of the New South.’
      • ‘That story is being woven by international tellers.’
      • ‘In many ways, it is the pivot on which J.K. Rowling's entire tale revolves; the fabric from which the next tale will be woven.’
      • ‘In a neatly woven narrative, he recounts the time he spent with young men for whom making it as rappers is the most likely, perhaps the only escape from an existence with virtually nil prospects.’
      • ‘In her new novel, she weaves a complex tale full of unexpected plot twists and turns.’
      • ‘The story has been woven from actual incidents.’
      • ‘It will come in handy later in the movie when we begin to wonder just exactly where the real person fits into the complex story woven around her.’
      • ‘From this offbeat narrative experiment, Greendale weaves a story of good, simple townsfolk under assault from authoritarian governments, corporations, media and so on.’
    4. 1.4Include an element in (such a story or pattern)
      ‘flashbacks are woven into the narrative’
      • ‘Somehow throughout my childhood I have taken on this simple traditional superstition, accepted it and have woven it into the workings of my own life.’
      • ‘Yet another strand that is woven into the story is the way women have been treated by their men through generations.’
      • ‘I wove the Cinderella Fairy Tale into this story so you'll be seeing quite a few things from that fairy tale altered to fit my story.’
      • ‘As such it entertains and titillates, yet unexpectedly moves to deeper levels through a series of related myths mysteriously woven into the story.’
      • ‘From songs neatly woven into the story's fabric to the dances that are performed with athletic ferocity, Minnelli's name is stamped all over it.’
      • ‘He is often seen as a painter of delicate interiors, but look again, says Sarah Whitfield, and the tension of his domestic life is woven into the dense patterns of his paintings.’
      • ‘So I try to explain how those elements can be woven in a different way into a script.’
      • ‘By weaving her cultural heritage into the fabric of her music, Shakira has introduced her audience to a new world - one she is proud of as it defines who she is.’
      • ‘This is woven into the story as two girls gesturing in sign language relate the fate of a young woman, who in their version waits in vain for her boyfriend to return and ends up working as a dancer.’
      • ‘Still, there is something he wrote recently and that I am compelled to disagree with that must be woven into my story here.’
      • ‘And this has been woven into the larger story, of the malevolent sea, which cannot be trusted at all at the moment.’
      • ‘‘There are elements of truth woven into this,’ he says, reassuringly.’

noun

  • 1[usually with adjective] A particular style or manner in which something is woven.

    ‘scarlet cloth of a very fine weave’
    • ‘It is in that episode that the larger implications of Schreiner's intricate weave of fiction and autobiography become apparent.’
    • ‘Beneath it lay more men's clothes, including linen tunics of fine weave and workmanship.’
    • ‘Gregor Jordan's Ned Kelly is a glorious film, beautifully photographed against the Australian landscape, a brilliant weave of fact and fantasy.’
    • ‘We have tried to create textures that would give a look of the beautiful weave used in Central Asian carpets.’
    • ‘Moya's book is a masterful weave of empirical study and analytical insights.’
    • ‘To minimize staining and wear and tear, Carmichael chooses cottons with a tight weave and a pattern.’
    • ‘Many different patterns are possible, producing different kinds of textile and styles of weave.’
    • ‘If the basket has an open weave at the upper edge, a ribbon or fabric tie can be woven through the wicker.’
    • ‘The trailing veil brushed an ember, the material curling and shrinking as orange sparks raced up its fine weave.’
    • ‘It can be a delicate weave or one that is more basic, heavy, or plain.’
    • ‘There were different weaves in jute and blends of jute with cotton and silk.’
    • ‘There are roses, leopards and paisleys, reds, golds and indigos, fine weaves and coarse weaves.’
    • ‘The screen was woollen, an open weave to let the sound through from behind, with darned patches, brighter than the yellowed screen.’
    • ‘History does not record stitched garments till a fairly late date but garments made from fine cloth, with intricate weaves and designs, were very much part of ancient India.’
    • ‘Look for wool or acrylic knit hats with a tight, thick weave.’
    • ‘Traditional basketry involves great care and pride, the weaver showcasing his skill through intricate weaves, designs, and colours.’
    • ‘Now, though all the traditional weaves, styles and colour are there, we have to take them forward.’
    • ‘It appeared to have one more cloth under the heavier top cloth of thick high-quality fine weave, but was smooth and slippery like silk.’
    • ‘Spaces recurring at regular intervals but shifting to the right on each subsequent line create an intricate, jacquardlike weave.’
    • ‘Brocade is a jacquard weave with an embossed effect and contrasting surfaces.’
  • 2A hairstyle created by weaving pieces of real or artificial hair into a person's existing hair, typically in order to increase its length or thickness.

    ‘trailers show him with dyed blond hair and, in one scene, a flowing blond weave’
    • ‘You can have any color with a weave.’
    • ‘Her blonde weave, plucked and meticulously painted eyebrows, bandana, kitschy makeup, and attitude exude hip-hop's aesthetic.’
    • ‘Don't weigh down a weave with heavy products like gels or moisturizing lotions, or by adding too much hair.’
    • ‘Who has the patience to get a weave?’
    • ‘I'd be disappointed too if I had a weave that blatantly fake.’
    • ‘It's not just black women who love to wear a weave.’
    • ‘When the hairstylists showed up to do all the girls' hair they removed her weave and left her hair in this afro-ish, puffy look.’
    • ‘Well, I don't have a weave.’
    • ‘To avoid a weave that looks like a wig, take care not to add too much hair.’
    • ‘Put a bad weave on me, slap me in some bedazzled panties that are three sizes too small, and I could probably wander around and forget how to lip-sync, too.’

Origin

Old English wefan, of Germanic origin, from an Indo-European root shared by Greek huphē web and Sanskrit ūrṇavābhi spider literally wool-weaver The current noun sense dates from the late 19th century.

Pronunciation:

weave

/wēv/

Main definitions of weave in English

: weave1weave2

weave2

verb

[NO OBJECT]
  • 1 Twist and turn from side to side while moving somewhere in order to avoid obstructions.

    ‘he had to weave his way through the crowds’
    • ‘Cars swerved this way and that to avoid them as they weaved in and around the traffic.’
    • ‘We weaved back and forth across the road to avoid the largest of the potholes, dodging trucks and motorbikes and cows along the way.’
    • ‘After weaving between a few trees, the vehicle climbs a subtle dune and stops.’
    • ‘The cabbie often harbours the misconception that he is a racing driver and your heart will be in your mouth as you see him weave and twist in the traffic.’
    • ‘His car rumbled through dense vegetation and weaved back and forth to avoid trees.’
    • ‘The four weaved through the trees, heading for the western edge of the forest.’
    • ‘During this he drove through red traffic lights, forced other vehicles to brake to avoid collisions, weaved in and out of traffic, and reached 85 mph.’
    • ‘Fast-paced dance music was playing, and people were either dancing like crazy, making out or weaving through the crowds looking for their dates.’
    • ‘Butler was weaving through the traffic, trying to get as close as possible.’
    • ‘On the night of the rally, we walked with the crowd for nearly an hour, bobbing and weaving to avoid the umbrellas.’
    • ‘Then Mary started to throw things and he had to duck and weave to avoid the homemade missiles.’
    • ‘She easily weaved around the few cars which were on the road.’
    • ‘While the convoy weaved its way through the narrow streets of a small town, an improvised explosive devise exploded.’
    • ‘She carefully weaved her way through the crowd of students making for the exit.’
    • ‘She waved at him over her shoulder before they followed the young man through the streets, desperately trying not to lose sight of him while weaving in and out of the rowdy crowd.’
    • ‘Witnesses described how the two men were driving ‘like madmen’, weaving in and out of traffic, cutting in front of buses, and speeding around roundabouts.’
    • ‘The girl weaved through the throng of people to stumble into the nearest tent.’
    • ‘Horns blare as cars weave to avoid horse-drawn carts.’
    • ‘Everyone is weaving all over the road to avoid the deep holes.’
    • ‘I wondered about a lot of things as I weaved through the few remaining cars to mine.’
    • ‘She sighed and looked over at him before weaving back through the trees.’
    • ‘They started down the crowded hallway, weaving around slower moving crowds.’
    • ‘Several witnesses observed a driver in a 1993 Chevrolet Cavalier speeding and weaving in and out of traffic while northbound on PR 216.’
    dodge, move in and out, swerve, zigzag, criss-cross
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1Take evasive action in an aircraft, typically by moving it from side to side.
      • ‘We just put the nose down and went weaving and skidding in a dive, passing over the breakwater of Cherbourg at about 400 feet.’
      • ‘Ducking, spinning, banking and weaving, they were putting up a splendid bulletless dogfight.’
      • ‘As we weaved through the screen of helicopter gunships on our final approach, I turned to Adrian, smiling the smile of a very happy man, and couldn't believe what I saw.’
      • ‘RAF planes which return to Britain to refuel take off again and weave through the flak above Dieppe ‘pasting enemy airfields.’’
      • ‘Gritting his teeth and squinting with determination he pursued the enemy fighter that weaved in and out of his sights but he stayed with it.’
      • ‘The orange and white striped jet fighters would weave in and out of formations with skill akin to that of ballet dancers.’
      • ‘As I attack, I weave from side to side, occasionally looping around the gunship I'm currently firing at.’
      • ‘Max was in a dogfight, he saw, weaving around a rapidly moving enemy.’
      • ‘The fighters weave around one another in an impressive display of aerodynamic acrobatics in space.’
      • ‘Radar controls fired their guns, and if we didn't turn constantly, weaving about, we'd be shot down within a minute or less.’
      • ‘Fighters were weaving in and out, some exploding in tiny flashes of light.’
      • ‘If you miss him coming in, you can shoot him as he recovers from his attack if you keep weaving.’
    2. 1.2(of a horse) repeatedly swing the head and forepart of the body from side to side (considered to be a vice)
      • ‘Special grilles can be put over the stable door to restrict the movement of the head and neck when the horse is standing with his head over the stable door, but some horses weave inside the stable.’
      • ‘Of course she used to pace up and down the paddocks when she was turned out, too, but she didn't weave in the field.’
      • ‘When a horse weaves he is basically walking in place, swaying his front and neck from side to side repetitively.’

Origin

Late 16th century: probably from Old Norse veifa to wave, brandish.

Pronunciation:

weave

/wēv/