Main definitions of weal in English

: weal1weal2

weal1

(also wheal)

noun

  • 1A red, swollen mark left on flesh by a blow or pressure.

    • ‘At the first bell after dinner she was back in the gym with Kev, who noticed the red wheals on her arms even before he had started teaching her.’
    • ‘Mr Brown said: ‘I have got big wheals on my wrists where the handcuffs were, and I fell and bashed up my legs, which are very painful.’’
    • ‘And they had these sharp little edges that could leave a hell of a weal if they caught you at the right angle.’
    • ‘The whip came down again, this time leaving a red wheal where it had hit.’
    • ‘The angry cross-hatch of purple weals between his nipples is matched by four on his back and, according to some reports, one on his buttocks.’
    • ‘You could always tell where she'd been in the school, you just followed the red weals on the legs of the kids.’
    • ‘His back was covered in weals where he had been flogged.’
    • ‘There was a red line running from David's chin, across his cheek and over the corner of his eye, disappearing into his hairline, and it was swelling rapidly into a sizeable weal.’
    • ‘Their idea of a fun Saturday afternoon is to go paintballing and end up covered in golfball-sized red weals from being shot at close range.’
    • ‘Lifting the edge of the blanket, she managed to turn him on his side so she could lean over and scrub the back of him and she was horrified to see dozens of long, thin, red weals from his shoulders down to his waist. ‘Oh, you poor creature!’’
    • ‘I sat in it once when they were picking tomatoes, my feet dangling, the ridge of the seat hurting my thighs, making red weals.’
    welt, wound, lesion, swelling
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1Medicine An area of the skin which is temporarily raised, typically reddened, and usually accompanied by itching.
      • ‘This causes inflammation and fluid to gather under the skin, causing wheals and the blood vessels to dilate.’
      • ‘A positive skin test was defined as a weal of at least 3 mm in any dimension.’
      • ‘Urticarial wheals can be greatly inhibited with the most potent antihistamines but usually cannot be totally suppressed, which suggests that histamine is not the only mediator.’
      • ‘Four days later he developed a mild temperature, a sore throat, blisters on the palms of his hands and weals on his tongue.’
      • ‘Within minutes, the area swells into an angry red lump called a weal.’
      • ‘The wheals can itch, and they look like mosquito bites.’

Origin

Early 19th century: variant of wale, influenced by obsolete wheal ‘suppurate’.

Pronunciation

weal

/wēl//wil/

Main definitions of weal in English

: weal1weal2

weal2

noun

formal
  • That which is best for someone or something.

    ‘I am holding this trial behind closed doors in the public weal’
    • ‘His attachment to the vow of celibacy takes overriding precedence over everything else, including the public weal.’
    • ‘This President has largely excused the rich and powerful from the onerous burden of lightening their wads a tiny bit for the public weal - with a resulting plunge in Treasury receipts.’
    • ‘National identity means a willingness to build the nation, which evolves from collective recognition of the need to share weal and woe.’
    • ‘Many will recognize in the Bush initiatives a potential danger to the public weal (is this yet another Republican effort to shrink government?’
    • ‘It provides a lesson in eliminating fiscal domination and ensuring the public weal.’
    • ‘There is no way for a democratic regime to prevent the citizens from watching and participating in exchanges of ideas, even if these are often half-baked or biassed, and not aimed at public weal.’
    • ‘Positions of trust were designated to all members of this Parliament, singly and corporately, who were seen as guardians of the public weal.’
    • ‘In these respects the substances resemble the superhuman powers themselves; they are ambiguous in character, and can cause either weal or woe.’
    • ‘He presupposes that personal liberation, however delightful, is not good enough for the public weal.’
    • ‘This enabled them to fashion the policies of the state in a manner that the woe and weal of the common man is addressed.’
    • ‘We are not invited to admire or condemn, only to experience the humanity of a woman making a choice, for weal or woe.’
    • ‘It is, instead, an exercise in careful selection of the finest legal minds to the better advantage of the public weal, and is undertaken in seriousness, sobriety and the fullest impartiality.’
    • ‘Should he show sloth in anything, he shall be liable to grave responsibility as the neglector of the state's weal.’
    • ‘Rather, we should view them in the context of their times and acknowledge the efforts many of them made towards trying to improve the public weal.’

Origin

Old English wela ‘wealth, well-being’, of West Germanic origin; related to well.

Pronunciation

weal

/wēl//wil/