Main definitions of warble in US English:

: warble1warble2

warble1

verb

[no object]
  • 1(of a bird) sing softly and with a succession of constantly changing notes.

    ‘larks were warbling in the trees’
    • ‘That time of year when the soul can't help but be gladdened by the returning flocks of small, colourful creatures darting about the streets and lawns of Cambridge, warbling incomprehensibly.’
    • ‘Somewhere in the branches above her head, a thrush warbled happily, and it was all that Hope could do not to join in.’
    • ‘Across the river birds warble in the bush - wood pigeons, tui and native parrots flit among the nikau palms and kahikatea.’
    • ‘Anyway, Mary tells me that the Cuckoo has been warbling outside her door in Ardrahan for some time now and the swallows have come back to old Kinvara.’
    • ‘As the weather heats up this summer, frog song may be as easy to hear as bird warbling.’
    • ‘Then a turf cutter sat on the side of the bank and ate his repost to the song of the Lark, as it warbled above him in the clear sky.’
    • ‘The only other bird we saw using the houses was a small brown fellow warbling merrily for no one in particular.’
    • ‘There were popping sounds, birds warbling, half-stifled cries - of rigmarole of street sounds that just totally entranced me.’
    trill, sing, chirp, chirrup, chirr, cheep, twitter, tweet, whistle, chatter, squeak, pipe, peep
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    1. 1.1 (of a person) sing in a trilling or quavering voice.
      ‘he warbled in an implausible soprano’
      • ‘She doesn't sing, she chokes, she trills, she warbles.’
      • ‘Soon the sounds of tuning instruments filled the afternoon, then the accordion warbled out its organ-like notes.’
      • ‘Or those interminable songs delivered with an earnest warble to three chords on a guitar that warned a complacent world that ‘the new times are a-comin’.’
      • ‘Willie Nelson is warbling through the stereo and the sun is slipping fast into the Texas Hill Country.’
      • ‘She slowly let go of his hand and walked behind the makeshift stage, where a woman was warbling out a country song.’
      • ‘In fact, I'm probably pretty close to how old Jessel was back then, when he'd be dragged out of mothballs to warble outmoded old songs in that peculiar nasal delivery of his.’
      • ‘Her voice warbled once more as she caught his hand, holding it gently in her lap with both hands.’
      • ‘The B - 52's chirp and warble their way through an energetic three-song set as only they can.’
      • ‘The audio foreground, however, is dominated by the insipid, warbling, and off-key sound of Gareth Gates murdering a late 1970s disco classic.’
      • ‘Equally enjoyable's Daltrey's sparkling, humorous take on ‘Mack The Knife’, complete with musical theatre ladies warbling away.’
      • ‘‘Veni, Veni, Venias,’ instead of ending with a single held note, as written, ends with the chorus warbling melismatically between two.’
      • ‘In the Outer Hebrides they still sing a very ancient kind of unaccompanied plainchant - first the minister starts warbling, then the congregation joins in, ululating and carolling, nasally.’
      • ‘As the chorus finished Kyle jumped out of the crowd and finished with a solo on the final ‘Happy birthday to you’ of the song, warbling ridiculously, making her laugh harder at him.’
      • ‘In the singing department, his Bolan-esque warble is as expressive as it is idiosyncratic and lyrically, I somehow can't see him being one to slave over a couplet.’
      • ‘Those were the things I mulled over that night on the gravel bar as my classmate strummed his six-string and we all joined in from time to time, warbling as only a bunch of half-tipsy songsters can warble.’
      • ‘The episode is simply a lot of fun, as Fred and Barney unknowingly get help from Ann-Margaret in auditioning for a show she is putting on, and she even gets to warble a pair of songs herself.’
      • ‘The callers recounted tedious vows, painfully off-key songs warbled by bride and groom, the inclusion of the groom's dog in the ceremony.’
      • ‘After warbling a couple high notes in ‘I Will Always Love You,’ she stopped once again and began singing ‘American Pie.’’
      • ‘Rina's voice rose to a frantic warbling, her face turning red as well.’
      • ‘After more than forty years on the road, Ronnie Drew can still warble a song, tell a yarn and play an audience as he proved in the wonderful atmosphere of Stage 2 in The Forum on Saturday night last.’
      trill, sing, chirp, chirrup, chirr, cheep, twitter, tweet, whistle, chatter, squeak, pipe, peep
      View synonyms

noun

  • A warbling sound or utterance.

    • ‘His falsetto warbles, a bit different than his normal voice, are only a background on the latter, third behind Kweli's voice and the amazing production.’
    • ‘Problem is, this pushes Mandell's vaguely tenuous, aloof vocals up front, affected twangs, warbles and all.’
    • ‘Not a single warble, tweet, or chirp can be heard - nothing but the faint buzz of insects, the passing hum of a distant airplane, and the hushed rustle of the wind.’
    • ‘The only way tell is by the sound of Johnston's voice - his tenor warble appears in various stages of refinement on the fourteen tracks here.’
    • ‘He was singing; the song was a buzzy warble followed by a trill.’
    trill, trilling, song, birdsong, cry, warbling, chirp, chirping, chirrup, chirruping, chirr, chirring, cheep, cheeping, twitter, twittering, tweet, tweeting, whistle, whistling, chatter, chattering, squeak, squeaking, pipe, piping, peep, peeping, call, calling
    View synonyms

Origin

Late Middle English (as a noun in the sense ‘melody’): from Old Northern French werble (noun), werbler (verb), of Germanic origin; related to whirl.

Pronunciation

warble

/ˈwɔrbəl//ˈwôrbəl/

Main definitions of warble in US English:

: warble1warble2

warble2

noun

  • 1A swelling or abscess beneath the skin on the back of cattle, horses, and other mammals, caused by the presence of the larva of a warble fly.

    • ‘Deregulating the rendering process and/or dosing cattle for warbles with organo-phosphates gave us mad cow disease.’
    • ‘The Minister urged herdowners to inspect all their cattle for warbles on a regular and systematic basis from now until August.’
    1. 1.1 The larva of the warble fly.
      • ‘According to these battle-scarred veterans, the best way to get rid of a larva is to plaster a thick piece of bacon on your skin above the breathing hole of a larva's warble.’

Origin

Late Middle English: of uncertain origin.

Pronunciation

warble

/ˈwɔrbəl//ˈwôrbəl/