Definition of walkover in English:

walkover

noun

  • 1An easy victory.

    ‘they won in a 12–2 walkover’
    • ‘Such internal turmoil might have resulted in the past from a damaging military defeat, but has never followed such a walkover victory.’
    • ‘So why is everyone assuming it will be another walkover for Labour on May 5?’
    • ‘Small, splintered and cash-strapped opposition parties struggled against shifting electoral boundaries and costly election fees as the PAP enjoyed another walkover win last year.’
    • ‘Fast, intelligent and a great tackler, he will be no walkover, even for players as good as Olivier Magne, Budge Pountney and Neil Back.’
    • ‘With Castellana enjoying his best year as a driver, Smith knew his first-round race would be no walkover.’
    • ‘In defeats, small or big, much is learned but walkovers are soul-destroying.’
    • ‘Every year there are professional teams getting knocked out of the Cup by amateur clubs and, while there are some walkover games, there are others that are very close.’
    • ‘The Exeter game was a bit of a walkover for them in the end but I don't think that will happen again.’
    • ‘After his walkover first-round victory, Vaks went on to lose in the third round of the competition.’
    • ‘What was expected to be a walkover almost turned into a nightmare for Denmark in their World Cup qualifying group three bout against Malta last night.’
    • ‘The Italians weren't walkovers, repelling a number of New Zealand's opportunities in the first 10 minutes and eventually crossing for a try 11 minutes after half-time.’
    • ‘True, they realized that it wouldn't be a walkover.’
    • ‘Ferris concludes that ‘the Battle of Britain was a walkover, one of the most one-sided victories in military history’.’
    • ‘We are giving the fans a genuine fight, and it is not going to be a walkover.’
    • ‘Another election walkover - the punters are in the palms of our hands.’
    • ‘Although I'm confident Ali would have defeated Louis, it would have been a close fight and not a walkover as some have suggested.’
    • ‘But the tour will be no walkover as the Australians will be seeking to retrieve some prestige.’
    • ‘‘It really isn't going to be a walkover to enforce this law,’ she says.’
    • ‘His victory over Handley wasn't exactly a walkover; Handley's parents own a squash club in Oxfordshire so he knows his way around a squash court and moves with grace and economy.’
    • ‘While decisive, the women's victory wasn't exactly a walkover.’
    easy victory, runaway victory, rout, landslide, triumph, game, set, and match, gift
    piece of cake, kid's stuff, child's play, doddle, pushover, cinch, breeze, sitter, picnic, like taking candy from a baby, thrashing, whitewash
    shoo-in, cake walk, duck soup
    snip
    piece of piss
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 A win by forfeit.
      • ‘There was disappointment for the Enniscrone senior footballers on Saturday evening last, when they received a walkover from Drumcliffe, who were unable to field a team.’
      • ‘In the girls u-17 final, Gráinne Hughes partnered Gráinne Brennan and received a walkover when their Dublin opponents failed to appear.’
      • ‘The Newcastle no-show gave York a walkover and success in the third round, to be played on Sunday, October 29 against as yet unnamed opponents, will leave them two games away from a place in the final.’
      • ‘Young Joanne Somers of Poppleton club was awarded the women's singles trophy on a walkover when number one seed Betty Norman (York RI) withdrew because of illness.’
      • ‘The Rock u-16 team received a walkover from The Harps in the u-16 league and remain undefeated in their division.’
      • ‘Peter Lawson, the August winner, beat Ian Harrison 2-0 and Phil Anderson received a walkover as John Dodd was unable to attend because of work commitments.’
      • ‘Australia's unseeded Natalie Grinham was the beneficiary of the walkover and will now face her sister Rachael Grinham in the quarter-finals.’
      • ‘Premier Division - Castle Villa received a walkover from Roberstown on Sunday, January 28.’
      • ‘Puerto Rico went 1 up in the third bout when Olympian Joseph Serrano, won via walkover.’
      • ‘Little Lever failed to appear for last Sunday's opening first round matches at Bolton School, leaving Bradshaw with a walkover into the second round.’
      • ‘Taking advantage of a walkover caused by withdrawal due to injury by Liam Griffith in the semi-final, Surendran was, nevertheless, the underdog for the final against Chris Gilbert.’
      • ‘After a bye in the first round and a walkover in the second round when his opponent failed to show, Davison knocked out Lancastrian Michael Ward 4-2 before beating Day.’
      • ‘Clane seconds were unable to field, giving Cill Dara a walkover.’
      • ‘There was Venus' last-minute withdrawal at Indian Wells last year, Serena awarded the walkover and rewarded with resounding jeers throughout her ensuing final.’
      • ‘The next county board meeting will decide on walkovers or withdrawals and the second games were due for Monday or Tuesday of this week.’
      • ‘Seven others have been abandoned before completion while 18 teams have been awarded walkover victories to date because their opponents have failed to fulfil fixtures.’
      • ‘He got a first round walkover yesterday when controversial Aussie Quinten Hann failed to turn up for the event.’
      • ‘It started in a dull fashion, though, when Miranda Ranieri was forced to withdraw from the event for personal reasons, giving the top seed Melissa Martin a walkover.’
      • ‘The York team comprehensively beat Stoke City in the first round and received a walkover in round two when their opponents, Newcastle United, failed to turn up.’
      • ‘They had to make do with a walkover in their final match of the season when opponents Victoria failed to show.’
  • 2A somersault in which a gymnast performs a handstand and then slowly moves the feet backward and down to the floor, or first arches back into a handstand and then slowly moves the feet forward and down to the floor.

    • ‘On balance beam, China's Qi Linzi performed a steady combination of aerial walkover to full-twisting Shushunova.’
    • ‘I also mixed in some pseudo-Pilates mat work and a walkover.’
    • ‘Being a gymnast was beginning to hurt too much; there were too many moves I was told that I should no longer attempt, from handsprings to backward walkovers; and I was, for the first time, feeling fear.’
    • ‘Regularly she turns the entire house into a gym, doing flips and walkovers and stuff with her friends.’
    • ‘This doesn't mean you have to stretch until you can perform a split or do a backward walkover.’
    • ‘As a specialty dancer for Ziegfeld she performed backward walkovers leading the elephants on to the stage.’
    • ‘Back walkover, flip flop, flip flop, double back with a hop.’

Pronunciation

walkover

/ˈwôkˌōvər/