Definition of walk the streets in US English:

walk the streets

phrase

  • 1Walk freely in a town or city.

    • ‘All people of all races, of all faiths can walk the streets of our cities, towns and villages.’
    • ‘‘Irish people are scared to walk the streets of the capital city at night for fear of either being assaulted themselves or witnessing an attack,’ said Mr Costello.’
    • ‘Large numbers of snake charmers once could be seen walking the streets of cities and towns, their cloth-covered baskets hanging from bamboo poles slung across the shoulders.’
    • ‘It is the first duty of any Government to protect the public and it seems increasingly clear that we no longer know who is walking the streets of our towns and villages.’
    • ‘Some of the men and women walking the streets of our towns, cities and villages are actually not well.’
    • ‘Many people are now afraid to walk the streets of their own towns at night, which is an enormous shame.’
    • ‘Time and again, we feel we are there, in the state rooms of senators and princes, or sailing the Mediterranean in a small, swift boat, or walking the streets of the great city itself.’
    • ‘My trusty spies have been at work again recently, spotting the ‘rich’ and ‘famous’ as they walk the streets of this fine city.’
    • ‘The very best days were those spent walking the streets of your lovely town of Lismore.’
    • ‘With the passing of our Town Hall those days are now but distant memories and far removed from an era when it is no longer safe to walk the streets of our town in early morning.’
  • 2Work as a prostitute.

    • ‘I can only take it that this question refers to ‘adult’ prostitutes, the kind we see walking the streets in most towns and cities, or working in saunas and massage parlours.’
    • ‘He made friends with the prostitutes who walked the streets and even the Narcs, who sold their vials of death on every street corner.’
    • ‘But they have vowed to carry on walking the streets near the town centre because they believe they have no alternative.’
    • ‘We see 13 and 14-year-olds walking the streets of Manukau selling themselves, because they cannot afford to support themselves.’
    • ‘They say an increasing number of prostitutes are walking the streets bringing violent and drug-related crime with them.’
    • ‘Alongside the strip clubs, peep shows, and massage parlors, a large number of prostitutes walked the streets.’
    • ‘People who object to prostitutes walking the streets near their homes would be pleased as prostitutes would be allowed to advertise in appropriate media and so ‘work from home’.’
    • ‘Beggars, gamblers, drunkards, and prostitutes walked the streets, looking for money which, one way or the other, they would get.’
    • ‘If the police crack down on the prostitutes who walk the streets, and the curb-crawlers who provide them their trade, they will be forced off of the streets.’
    • ‘As the prostitute walks the streets and alleys, she incorporates herself into the city through her communion with the crowd.’
    working as a prostitute, involved in prostitution, whoring, prostituting oneself, selling oneself, selling one's body, walking the streets, on the streets, practising the oldest profession, working in the sex industry
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