Definition of walk-on in English:

walk-on

adjective

  • [attributive] Denoting a small nonspeaking part in a play or film.

    • ‘As the series has developed, the three guests featured in each edition have become little more than walk-on extras.’
    • ‘He plays Andy Millman, a wannabe actor condemned to play walk-on roles or merge into crowd scenes, all the while grumbling about the stars.’
    • ‘Norma was an actress and had worked with The Old Vic, but, bored with walk-on parts, she was trying to get a foothold elsewhere.’
    • ‘All sorts of politicians and performers and charlatans make walk-on appearances.’
    • ‘Two floors of open galleries rise above the foyer, magically transforming the musicians carrying instruments between classes, into walk-on extras in a theatre production.’
    • ‘Incidentally, director Kamal's film also has Mahima Chaudhary in yet another walk-on role.’
    • ‘During the day I do walk-on work in programmes with murder in the title.’
    • ‘The story of Helen prompted a similar style treatment in a Robert Wise production, in which the young Brigitte Bardot had a walk-on part.’
    • ‘He eventually found a position performing in a children's theatre group and was offered walk-on roles in local T.V. commercials.’
    • ‘And then, suddenly, she was everybody's walk-on girlfriend on television - in, among many others, Coronation Street, On the Buses and Steptoe and Son.’
    • ‘The film explores the notion that we are all playing walk-on roles through other people's lives.’
    • ‘Cumming quickly became very busy, with stage roles in Scotland and walk-on parts in TV shows such as Taggart.’
    • ‘Unlike the previous installment, this movie focuses primarily on the students, allowing many of the adults little more than walk-on cameos.’
    • ‘She still recalls each event fondly, telling me about her daily show at the Oklahoma State Fair in 2002 and her walk-on cameo for Fox's ‘Mad TV’.’
    • ‘When she left school, she was turned down by drama school and went into modelling, eventually winning some walk-on parts in films.’
    • ‘Kelly says: ‘The producers gave me a walk-on part in the film but for whatever reason I didn't make it to the final cut.’’
    • ‘It may be that we learn more about the past by focusing on the walk-on parts than by rehearsing yet again the well-known facts about those who occupy centre stage.’
    • ‘Later, she did walk-on work in Spike Lee's film about her father and lived in Phoenix for awhile, after she fell for an NBA player that she thought she might marry.’
    • ‘He will appear in a walk-on role in a Moscow Ballet production of Swan Lake along with the professional cast of top Russian artists.’
    • ‘She added: ‘I had a walk-on part in the film, and I met my late husband John on set.’’

noun

  • 1A person who plays a small nonspeaking part in a play or film, or the part itself.

    • ‘Featuring walk-ons from Frank Zappa and Dennis Hopper, the film is also awash with fantastic music.’
    • ‘I thought I was being auditioned as a walk-on, and that would've suited me fine.’
    • ‘I could easily imagine Aaron Spelling bumping into Hackman at the Playboy Club and badgering him into a quick walk-on.’
    • ‘Forrest Whitaker is his usual melancholic self: the butt of several jokes made by the sniper, while Katie Holmes' role, is more of a walk-on.’
    • ‘Yes, and I'm hoping that if the academy has a nomination for the best walk-on, I hope that I'll qualify.’
    • ‘A big-boned, sharp-tongued farm girl, Josie is the beating heart of this play and the kind of role actors dream of through years of movie walk-ons and commercials.’
    • ‘Oh my god, it's hilarious, his best cameo/appearance since his walk-on in The Muse.’
    • ‘So when I was asked to do walk-ons in Edward Lee's Header and the movie of my own book The Lost I said sure.’
    • ‘In order to salute the real-life equivalents of its subjects, the film affects a semi-documentary style, casts character actresses rather than stars in the leads, and uses genuine military personnel as walk-ons.’
    • ‘‘I'm not just a walk-on, I actually have lines,’ he explains.’
    • ‘Entertaining cameos by the likes of Donald Trump to David Bowie add some more spice but when spotting celebrity walk-ons is the most entertaining thing about a film that's a problem.’
    • ‘The movie is chock full of cameos - everyone from the Olsen Twins to Bruce Willis to one of the original Angels gets a walk-on.’
    • ‘In an odd bit of casting, Kris Kristofferson has a walk-on as Karubi, Daena's father, who comes to a somewhat gruesome end.’
    • ‘Well, my break, I think, was starting at the bottom, sort of, as a walk-on in ‘Coreolanus,’ and slowly, you know, working my way up.’
    • ‘If I could do things over again, I would go back and play a small part for Fellini or a walk-on for Bertolucci.’
    1. 1.1North American A sports player with no regular status in a team.
      • ‘With an exemplary work ethic and attitude, Thornton, a former walk-on at North Carolina, will attack his opportunity.’
      • ‘Larry Berkman played baseball as a walk-on at the University of Texas and coached most of his son's early youth league teams.’
      • ‘The strongside linebackers, Shanle and Baker, are walk-ons who earned spots with hard work.’
      • ‘Alabama is determined to find a suitable backup for QB Brodie Croyle, even if it means developing a walk-on.’
      • ‘So he met Chris Spitler, a Holy Cross guard proud to be a four-year walk-on who, through the seasons, worked his way from the end of the bench into the starting lineup.’
      • ‘Tech had only eight pitchers - and a couple of those were walk-ons.’
      • ‘Mutz, a former walk-on at Arizona State, had two touchdown receptions in the Sun Devils' season-opening victory over Northern Arizona.’
      • ‘This time last year they only had eight players on scholarship, which meant two walk-ons started the annual Blue-White game.’
      • ‘He went to Arizona State on an academic scholarship and made the team as a walk-on.’
      • ‘He made the team as a walk-on and will leave it as one of its most successful offensive players in history.’
      • ‘Michelle then transferred to Rutgers in 2001 as a sophomore and joined the swim team as a walk-on.’
      • ‘Former linebacker Adam Archuleta went from walk-on to first-round NFL draft pick last spring.’
      • ‘Lucky for him, his third defensive end was a walk-on who had some experience.’
      • ‘Christian Moody has been about as good as a walk-on can be, but it's a lot to ask him to play 20-plus minutes on a Final Four-level team.’
      • ‘Chances are, he's better than most walk-ons but not as good as most first-year scholarship players.’
      • ‘With a roster heavy on walk-ons and light on returning veterans, Georgia won three of its first four games, losing only at Gonzaga in overtime.’
      • ‘The next option is rookie Nick Hardwick, a former walk-on at Purdue who has played center one year.’
      • ‘Walls originally made the team as a walk-on, but he was awarded a scholarship this season.’
      • ‘In 1994, she was a walk-on at the Newport Beach outrigger canoe club; in 2000 she and her eight crewmates won the sport's national championships.’
      • ‘In 1990, Hamilton entered the University of Colorado, in Boulder, as a freshman and joined the school's ski team as a walk-on.’

Pronunciation:

walk-on

/ˈwôk ˌôn/