Definition of wade in English:

wade

verb

[NO OBJECT]
  • 1Walk through water or another liquid or soft substance.

    ‘we waded ashore’
    • ‘It was as much a new world to me then as it was to those earliest Europeans who waded ashore nearly 500 years before me.’
    • ‘There were children building sandcastles and surfers wading out into the water carrying their surf boards under their arms.’
    • ‘He adds that locals know how busy the event can get, and the thought of wading through dense crowds can discourage people from attending.’
    • ‘Most of the water is ideal for wading and one could reach long distances but with care, as there were some sharp drops into deep holes in the center of the river.’
    • ‘An hour out we came across a swift stream and found a good spot to wade across the icy water.’
    • ‘We waded ashore knee-deep in water and then we were bundled into trucks.’
    • ‘It took him three hours to wade though waist-high water too deep to take his two children with him.’
    • ‘Is this why my great-uncle waded ashore at Gallipoli, and my father fought in the Middle East, and my uncle spent years as a POW?’
    • ‘Most fishing is done from drift boats, because fluctuating water levels can make wading dangerous.’
    • ‘His second shot again lands in the water, so Peter wades out and retrieves the ball.’
    • ‘Like many gulls, the Mew Gull uses a variety of foraging techniques, obtaining food while walking, wading, swimming, or flying.’
    • ‘To Peter's astonishment a familiar figure was wading ashore, a red and white lifebelt about his waist.’
    • ‘He dived into the water and waded towards his son.’
    • ‘It was lovely just sitting in the sunshine, watching other people wading about in the water.’
    • ‘They waded out till the water was up to Sybil's waist.’
    • ‘At the concert site young workers were wading through a field full of discarded cartons, cans, bottles and plastic glasses.’
    • ‘I set off downstream, walking, wading and scrambling, trying to stay upright on the algae-covered rocks.’
    • ‘Pregnant turtles, too petrified by the commotion to wade ashore at night, are being forced to lay their eggs in the sea, where they cannot hatch.’
    • ‘The first crew was able to warn another team of miners working behind them, who waded to safety in water up to their necks.’
    • ‘The pictures show a female gorilla grabbing a branch to gauge the depth of a pool of water before wading across it.’
    paddle, wallow, dabble, slop, squelch, trudge, plod
    ford, cross, traverse, walk across, make one's way across
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    1. 1.1with object Walk through (something filled with water)
      ‘firefighters waded the waist-deep flood water’
      • ‘Sometimes I would walk for days in the woods, checking snares, tracking deer, wading the river, just walking.’
      • ‘We waded the first river barefoot, chilly but by no means unpleasant on such a warm day.’
      • ‘The next morning, while wading a long stretch of the river, I begin to sink in sand.’
      • ‘I waded the chilly waters of the Avon just above the point known as Ath na Fiann.’
      • ‘We will be wading some very big flats hunting big bones in very shallow water.’
      • ‘The anglers waded the river from John Fallon Bridge down to the Silver Swan Hotel on Saturday, July 26.’
      • ‘We wade the cold water, fishing for an hour in the driving rain.’
      • ‘If you're wading the flats, shuffle your feet - then if any rays are around they will pick up the vibrations and move away.’
      • ‘It can seem on prime summer days that only a handful of Texas' half-million coastal anglers are not wading the bays or surf.’
      • ‘It took me twenty minutes to wade the one hundred metres back to our hotel.’
      • ‘In the evening, if you stand on the Roman bridge, you can watch men wading the torpid cressy river, carrying pans.’
      • ‘When wading the flats, you don't walk but shuffle your feet.’
      • ‘It is possible to walk round the loch, but you might have to wade the river at its southern end to reach the track which will return you to the Lodge.’
      • ‘The rivers never have seen a dam, and the fish never have seen a hatchery, and the angler wading a remote gravel bar stands in the company of bears and eagles and wolves.’
      • ‘All the other competitors were paired up in boats, while I struggled against a howling head wind, wading the brackish water from the bank.’
      • ‘Every day brought similar exciting fishing, some of the best when wading the shallows near the reef.’
      • ‘Some people make sport of wading the Waddenzee at low tide wearing big rubber boots.’
      • ‘Don't try wading the flats like the locals do on your first trip.’
      • ‘He first got hooked on fish as a boy wading the streams of Washington's Olympic Peninsula.’
      • ‘He, of course, was wading the Tweed in February, without waders.’
    2. 1.2wade through Read laboriously through (a long piece of writing).
      • ‘This ought to be a simple enough question but wading through Railtrack's Financial Reports I am left none the wiser.’
      • ‘Arriving at the office I fired up the computer and started wading through the 105 e-mails I'd received during my week off.’
      • ‘Identifying a client's requirements and wading through individual properties on the market takes time and dedication.’
      • ‘The actions have left Kiely's senior team wading through paperwork.’
      • ‘If, after wading through the details above, you still want go through with it, you will need someone to officiate.’
      • ‘It's a peculiar feeling, wading through hundreds of old photographs and loading them into photo galleries.’
      • ‘We are still wading through the piles of responses with reader feedback.’
      • ‘However, I can resent having to wade through a piece only to come to the end and find nothing of value was said.’
      • ‘She's just surfaced, blinking like a mole, after wading through 50,000 pages of fiction in her role as a Booker Prize judge.’
      • ‘Employers are busy people and wading through hundreds of CVs is a time-consuming process.’
      • ‘We could imagine some clerks wading through rows and rows of files.’
      • ‘You don't have to wade through reams of reports or write them yourself.’
      • ‘Why spend the next four years of weekends memorising facts, cranking out essays, and wading through texts if all you want is to graduate?’
      • ‘There are more than 1,500 scans of such documentation for you to wade through.’
      • ‘As a PhD student in politics and international relations I am wading through security related analysis every day.’
      • ‘You've been wading through these figures line by line for several years now.’
      • ‘Catching up with stuff, wading through rather a lot of email, usual thing.’
      • ‘Who else would wade through every issue and still have the energy to read my column?’
      • ‘I've been wading through less spam lately thanks to a tip I got.’
      • ‘Businesses in the UK are reckoned to be losing up to £3.2bn a year wading through the junk.’
      work one's way, plough, plod, trawl, proceed with difficulty, labour, toil away at, plug away at
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    3. 1.3wade intoinformal Get involved in (something) vigorously or forcefully.
      ‘he waded into the yelling, fighting crowd’
      • ‘Sir Cyril also waded into the debate about the merits of state and private schools and university entrance.’
      • ‘Sachin Tendulkar wades into critics of his new batting style.’
      • ‘He wades into the melee, stocky arms thrust out to separate the protagonists.’
      • ‘A man has been jailed for four months after wading into a fight to help a friend he mistakenly thought was being attacked.’
      • ‘Morrissey has once again courted controversy by wading into the US presidential election battle.’
      • ‘Lay down the law on all of this and you risk wading into a swamp of disputes about context and ownership.’
      • ‘Consider the small number of governors who waded into controversy in the past year over their handling of state government.’
      • ‘Then Sainsbury's and Tesco said they were wading into cheap telecoms, too.’
      • ‘However, the aim of this article is not to bemoan irresponsible legislation, wade into a controversial issue or attack the ‘evils’ of our society.’
      • ‘Eyewitnesses say they waded into the students and beat them.’
      attack, set upon, assault, launch oneself at, weigh into, fly at, let fly at, turn on, round on, lash out at, hit out at, fall on, jump at, jump on, lunge at, charge, rush, storm
      get involved in, intervene in, get to work on, set to work on, tackle
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    4. 1.4wade ininformal Make a vigorous attack or intervention.
      ‘Nicola waded in and grabbed the baby’
      • ‘A struggle took place which led to the driver getting out of the car and wading in.’
      • ‘The reaction of others who heard this interview tends to confirm that listeners didn't need to have the interviewer wade in on their behalf.’
      • ‘The picture below left shows police wading in after trouble following the Liverpool match.’
      • ‘That afternoon the Fed and the Treasury waded in, buying $600 million worth of dollars in exchange for marks and yen.’
      • ‘The confusion develops focus then, security men wading in, jumping on a middle-aged man who is shouting something about medical negligence.’
      • ‘Then, just when I thought that the issue was dead and buried, in wades the First Minister with a declaration about how he intends to improve Scotland's eating habits.’
      • ‘Hundreds of armed police rushed on to the pitch and waded in as fists flew among the players.’
      • ‘The English teacher then wades in and informs me all first year teachers do it and she did it last year.’
      • ‘This didn't prevent opposition MSPs from wading in with both feet.’
      • ‘But the police waded in attacking people indiscriminately.’
      move in, set to, set to work, pitch in, buckle down, go to it, put one's shoulder to the wheel
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noun

  • An act of wading.

    • ‘The cave is a respectable size but we didn't follow it far, since after 30m a wade degenerated into a full on swim.’
    • ‘A wade along an October pond bank is a good way to water those roots.’
    • ‘The Bone Cave experience begins with an icy wade across the Duck River and part of the mouth of Bashaw Creek.’
    • ‘The three rivers can become impassable after rain, and trampers usually traverse west to east, so that the river wades are predictable at the time of departure.’
    • ‘A short wade out to sea, the bottom plates, remnants of the ship's engines and boiler lie collapsed upon themselves.’

Origin

Old English wadan ‘move onward’, also ‘penetrate’, from a Germanic word meaning ‘go (through)’, from an Indo-European root shared by Latin vadere ‘go’.

Pronunciation

wade

/weɪd//wād/