Definition of vitality in English:

vitality

noun

  • 1The state of being strong and active; energy.

    ‘changes that will give renewed vitality to our democracy’
    • ‘It releases tension, increases vitality and creates wholeness of mind, body and spirit.’
    • ‘It was this intimate knowledge of the human body that gave their work such dynamic vitality.’
    • ‘The illustrations are full of vitality and have their humorous touches.’
    • ‘Functioning at sub-optimal levels of health, energy and vitality seems par for the course for so many of us these days.’
    • ‘Sadly, this spark of vitality leaves the movie long before the curtain falls.’
    • ‘His seminal works are more than three decades old and yet his books retain a strange, contemporary vitality.’
    • ‘Taking one step at a time with complete attention and energy brings vitality and creativity to all you do.’
    • ‘The vitality of the democracy that has emerged from it is by any standards remarkable.’
    • ‘The feeling of energy and vitality returns along with a sense of joy.’
    • ‘If they do not have vitality and energy, you are not getting the most out of them.’
    • ‘Often what Nietzsche means is something close to vitality or even liveliness.’
    • ‘She was a woman of unusual energy and vitality and was at the height of her powers when she died.’
    • ‘Among his circle of friends, however, he was revered for his humour, charm and vitality.’
    • ‘Time and again on his frequent annual visits here, he speaks of the inner vitality and dynamism of India.’
    • ‘These changes require each of us to bring a sense of passion and vitality to the table each day.’
    • ‘If the hands are skinny and narrow, this shows a lack of energy or vitality.’
    • ‘The vigour of our country is no stronger than the vitality and will of all our countrymen.’
    • ‘He looked like a man possessed, full of energy and vitality, but he moved deliberately.’
    • ‘Nothing sells fitness better than a healthy body that sparkles with energy and vitality.’
    • ‘It is as if becoming prominent in a public sphere starts to rob you of the energy and vitality that drove you there in the first place.’
    • ‘The energy and vitality of his singing and dancing lighten things up considerably.’
    liveliness, life, energy, animation, spirit, spiritedness, high-spiritedness, vivacity, exuberance, buoyancy, bounce, vibrancy, verve, vim, pep, brio, zest, zestfulness, sparkle, spark, effervescence, dynamism, passion, fire, vigour, forcefulness, ardour, zeal, relish, gusto, push, drive, punch, elan
    zip, zing, fizz, get-up-and-go, oomph, pizzazz, feistiness
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1The power giving continuance of life, present in all living things.
      ‘the vitality of seeds’
      • ‘Ozone and drought are well-known stress factors that influence tree vitality in Europe and North America.’
      • ‘What remain are works of continuing interest and undiminished vitality.’
      • ‘Junk foods decrease total body vitality in both immediate strength and endurance.’
      • ‘Their continued vitality as they move closer and closer to death is what makes them real to us.’
      • ‘These are just a few of the ways people have sought to lengthen their lives and renew their vitality.’
      • ‘Two indicators of vitality were automatically sensed during the experiments.’
      • ‘In almost every aspect of daily life, vitality seems to be measured by the desire to change the status quo.’
      • ‘Where the Sun shines, truth, nobility and pure-penetrating vitality can be found.’
      • ‘It's a promissory ideal that can be redeemed only by our own vitality in the present.’
      • ‘She breathed deeply and allowed the heavenly air to tingle through her body - the air of life - of vitality.’
      • ‘Ippolito argues that the wide-open nature of the Internet accounts for its vitality.’
      • ‘The vitality of a language indicates how well a group is maintaining itself in society.’
      • ‘Nature is to be cared for, valued and respected in its protean variety and vitality.’
      • ‘A concern with the bones ignores the flesh and the blood, the spirit and vitality of form.’
      • ‘His ability to respond to artistic challenges ensured the continuing vitality of his art.’
      • ‘How would you account for the continuing vitality of Marxist thought?’
      • ‘The same electric vitality visible around the slough was charging life in the water, too.’
      • ‘I look at your photos, and I know that the beauty and power and vitality of nature are healing for you, as they are for me.’
      • ‘Surrogates for the human, the objects are haunted by the vitality of a former presence.’
      • ‘Jupiter's celestial brilliance portrays vitality, power, strength, and freedom of will.’

Origin

Late 16th century: from Latin vitalitas, from vitalis (see vital).

Pronunciation:

vitality

/vīˈtalədē/