Definition of verve in US English:

verve

noun

  • Vigor and spirit or enthusiasm.

    ‘Kollo sings with supreme verve and flexibility’
    • ‘This balletic score received a performance filled with rhythmic verve and brio.’
    • ‘The major parties have performed all right, but there's no excitement, no verve and no spirit.’
    • ‘Sure, there were film songs sung with verve, dances and a skit, and games for children scampering around.’
    • ‘With clarity and verve, he drove home the timeless message of the Gita.’
    • ‘Each number has energy and verve, with more emphasis on songs and arrangements than jazz content.’
    • ‘The group from Kolhapur in Maharashtra, to perform before Hyderabadis, was full of verve and vigour.’
    • ‘We commend the work of Jyllie in particular for her drive, verve and persistence in organising the parade.’
    • ‘In an overwhelmingly male milieu, the diminutive Borda added verve and vigour.’
    • ‘Its fire, intellectual verve and occasional fanaticism are almost unique in British journalism.’
    • ‘She was a young woman in her 20s who sparkled with creative verve and obvious good taste.’
    • ‘With verve and vigour, they hold on to their ideal of delivering the message of peace.’
    • ‘The problem is that none of Piggins' performance verve and energy makes it onto the CD.’
    • ‘Maybe we all have an inner desire to ascend towards the heavens with grace and verve.’
    • ‘Names should always be designated with verve and panache and Scotland, it turns out, has plenty of both.’
    • ‘I wrote an introductory e-mail to farms all over Quebec describing my fervour and verve.’
    • ‘The band have verve, youth and vigour and their ebullient style puts me in mind of The Monkees until I listen to the lyrics.’
    • ‘Teenage girls have passione and verve and the chutzpah to do anything and wear anything they want.’
    • ‘The jathis were in perfect harmony, and executed with energy and verve.’
    • ‘The design captures the spirit, character and verve of Chinese culture.’
    • ‘Here, in other words, is a nightmare vision of a world without originality, verve, spirit or love.’
    enthusiasm, vigour, energy, pep, dynamism, go, elan, vitality, vivacity, buoyancy, liveliness, animation, sprightliness, zest, sparkle, effervescence, fizz, spirit, spiritedness, ebullience, life, dash, brio, fervour, gusto, eagerness, keenness, passion, zeal, relish, feeling, ardour, fire, fieriness, drive, forcefulness, force, strength, determination, motivation, push, vehemence, fanaticism
    View synonyms

Origin

Late 17th century (denoting special talent in writing): from French, ‘vigor’, earlier ‘form of expression’, from Latin verba ‘words’.

Pronunciation

verve

/vərv//vərv/