Definition of verse in English:

verse

noun

  • 1Writing arranged with a metrical rhythm, typically having a rhyme.

    ‘a lament in verse’
    as modifier ‘verse drama’
    • ‘The second verse is composed in your head between the second and third stations of your trip.’
    • ‘She wrote well and often corresponded with friends in doggerel verse.’
    • ‘They began writing in iambic pentameter, or in some other " respectable " verse form.’
    • ‘The only way to write poetry is to begin by writing verse.’
    • ‘Johnson never claims, when writing Latin verse, to be writing formal verse imitation.’
    • ‘Robert Frost once classed poetry that way, free verse against formal verse.’
    • ‘The caricature was accompanied by doggerel verse which used Mr Tolley's name and extolled the virtues of the chocolate.’
    • ‘Think about taking away the net and writing some blank verse with some metaphors in it.’
    • ‘Among the pioneers of free verse, D. H. Lawrence stands out as one who, though gifted in metrical verse, is happier without meter.’
    • ‘Johnson uses all of these devices in writing his Latin verse imitations.’
    • ‘Her stories, told in nonsense verse, are fast-paced with a rhythm that carries through its pages.’
    • ‘Both he and Frost advocated the use of natural diction, and of colloquial speech rhythms in metrical verse.’
    • ‘But I don't want to suggest that Martin writes merely a serviceable blank verse.’
    • ‘I remember reading the following verse in one of my workbooks at primary school and having to memorize it.’
    • ‘The language is mostly the quaint island patois - not the stuff of verse drama.’
    • ‘For a comprehensive list of German hexameter verse, see Bennett 180-93.’
    • ‘Should rhymed verse be translated in English rhyme?’
    • ‘The upsurge of early printed verse translations makes public a large and rapidly distributed body of foreign-born poetry.’
    • ‘Haiku originated as a simple verse form used to entertain the Japanese upper class.’
    • ‘All Gunn's early verse rhymed - he was the most Appollonian of the 50s poets.’
    poetry, versification, metrical composition, rhythmical composition, rhyme, rhyming, balladry, doggerel
    poem, piece of poetry, lyric, sonnet, ode, limerick, rhyme, composition, metrical composition, piece of doggerel
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 A group of lines that form a unit in a poem or song; a stanza.
      ‘the second verse’
      • ‘He also wrote what I think is one of the most romantic verses of poetry ever.’
      • ‘They laugh and joke and make up verses to songs and poems and chants about women and body parts.’
      • ‘They both process thrilling ur-poetry: entangled, limitlessly complicated prose poems and verses.’
      • ‘The tale became the subject of songs, pamphlets, verses sold in trains and on the streets, and popular fiction.’
      • ‘Yasin was extremely nice, and answered my questions, oddly enough, with verses of poetry.’
      • ‘Painted all over the parchment that had been plastered to the walls, were verses of poetry.’
      • ‘Every language had its stock of lullabies, nursery rhymes, nonsense verses, fairytales and simple stories of light and delight.’
      • ‘He was a copious writer, dashing off verses, very often on the wet surfaces of pub tables.’
      • ‘The verses of this hymn became the favored marching song of the Union forces during the Civil War.’
      • ‘After crooning a couple of verses of that particular song, Charlie heard a loud thump resonate inside the room.’
      • ‘The way his poetry is structured, the verses and the stanzas have much in common with visual arts.’
      • ‘We sang the first three verses, and then came my part.’
      • ‘Today's poem is a verse from Byron's Childe Harold, speaking of pathless places.’
      • ‘Sarah listens to her, and then suddenly the two of them sing a verse of the song.’
      • ‘And they launched into verses upon verses of song.’
      • ‘A metro poem has as many verses as your trip has stations, minus one.’
      • ‘Hurston doesn't quote the third verse of the song, which gives the point of the passage away plainly.’
      • ‘Ritson also published several popular collections and anthologies of songs, children's verses, fairy stories, etc.’
      • ‘Like most pop music, this song transitions from a relatively calm verse to a more raucous chorus.’
      • ‘He sang 34 verses of a song that had been specially written for him.’
      stanza, strophe, stave, canto
      View synonyms
    2. 1.2 Each of the short numbered divisions of a chapter in the Bible or other scripture.
      • ‘Is there a single verse of the Scriptures that teaches us Christ came to bring us to Heaven where we no longer can sin?’
      • ‘Also among other tapes one was found in Arabic containing Koranic verses dedicated to teaching.’
      • ‘These moments draw on and return to a practice entrenched in evangelicalism: the use of Bible memory verses.’
      • ‘Some verses in the Bible imply that snow is a negative force, while others indicate that snow is a positive one.’
      • ‘Listen quietly in your heart and see if an encouraging phrase, or a Scripture verse, or a specific action starts to impress itself upon you.’
      • ‘I'll take a scripture verse from the Bible and I'll share it with a guy.’
      • ‘Koranic verses were recited, with the phrases passing from group to group.’
      • ‘My eyes scanned the page until I found the third verse of the first chapter.’
      • ‘In a short work like this we cannot examine all the verses in the Bible which refer to the devil and Satan.’
      • ‘It is the shortest verse in the whole Bible: those two words in the English language - Jesus wept.’
      • ‘Although the verse refers to a judge, the rationale applies to anyone in a position of public trust.’
      • ‘We have many different such divisions ranging from what would be long verses to chapter style divisions.’
      • ‘He opened the Bible to John and read the first two verses.’
      • ‘We choose to treat some verses of scripture as having more authority than others.’
      • ‘Inside the box, there is some candy and a heart-shaped eraser with a Bible verse attached to it.’
      • ‘It recounts, in twelve expansive books, a story line that occupies only a few verses of the book of Genesis.’
      • ‘Some 21 calligraphic panels of Quranic verses are also on show.’
      • ‘A later search uncovered detonators and a tape containing Koranic verses.’
      • ‘An evangelical justification for the physical discipline of children goes deeper than a few isolated verses in the Bible, however.’
      • ‘Rachel enjoys memorizing Bible verses and reciting them each week and playing games with her friends.’
    3. 1.3 A versicle.
      • ‘A liturgical chant sung as the refrain to the verses of a psalm.’
      • ‘He was quoting, and more specifically he was quoting the first verse of the twenty-second psalm.’
      • ‘The children memorize verses and are asked questions about doctrine.’
      • ‘Both paintings illustrate the power of God's creative energy so forcefully evoked in the opening verses of Psalm 8.’
    4. 1.4archaic A line of poetry.
      • ‘The sisters smiled at the poetry and added a verse onto it.’
      • ‘Semantic Poetry doesn't arrange verses into bunches of flowers.’
    5. 1.5 A passage in an anthem for a soloist or a small group of voices.
      • ‘I quoted from the second verse of our national anthem.’
      • ‘Oh, and there's a huge, meat-grinder chorus between the minstrel verses.’

verb

[NO OBJECT]archaic
  • Speak in or compose verse; versify.

    ‘he began to verse extemporaneously in her ear’
    with object ‘thou sat all day, playing on pipes and versing love’
    • ‘He maintains, ‘it is not rhyming and versing that maketh a poet.’’

Origin

Old English fers, from Latin versus ‘a turn of the plow, a furrow, a line of writing’, from vertere ‘to turn’; reinforced in Middle English by Old French vers, from Latin versus.

Pronunciation

verse

/vərs//vərs/