Main definitions of verge in English

: verge1verge2verge3

verge1

noun

  • 1An edge or border.

    ‘they came down to the verge of the lake’
    • ‘The flat verges were littered with seaweed and plastic flotsam.’
    edge, border, margin, side, brink, rim, lip, limit, boundary, outskirts, perimeter, periphery, borderline, frontier
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 An extreme limit beyond which something specified will happen.
      ‘I was on the verge of tears’
      • ‘Danna looked on the verge of tears as she nodded and tried to smile.’
      • ‘But the species is dwindling fast and is feared on the verge of extinction.’
      • ‘In all the industrialised countries the welfare state is on the verge of collapse.’
      • ‘Health bosses are believed to be on the verge of producing a new document outlining the fate of Ilkley's Coronation Hospital.’
      • ‘And then she turned to her friend, who seemed on the verge of collapsing.’
      • ‘A lot of the buildings were damaged or were on the verge of collapsing.’
      • ‘At the time of the merger, Nissan was on the verge of bankruptcy.’
      • ‘He approached companies who were on the verge of bankruptcy before he bought them.’
      • ‘I was on the verge of tears, but it needed to be said.’
      • ‘I screamed through my closed door, near the verge of tears.’
      • ‘An extremely competent golfer, Alf was on the verge of turning professional at one time.’
      • ‘By the late 1960s many believed the disease was on the verge of extinction.’
      • ‘"Matt and Kirsten are on the verge of breaking up, " Lily said.’
      • ‘But his centuries-old livelihood is on the verge of collapse since the areca nut price has crashed beyond imagination.’
      • ‘We're just at the verge of starting to really understand from the molecular level to the systems level how the brain works.’
      • ‘The majority of rolling stock was hideously dated and on the verge of collapse.’
      • ‘I hoped he didn't notice I was on the verge of a breakdown.’
      • ‘Our testing in Denver makes me believe we're on the verge of breaking through.’
      • ‘My voice has got so loud that it is on the verge of breaking.’
      • ‘The girl began to whimper again, and looked on the verge of tears.’
      brink, threshold, edge, point, dawn
      View synonyms
    2. 1.2British A grass edging such as that by the side of a road or path.
      • ‘In north Norfolk we are used to the dramatic appearance of a Barn Owl as it hunts the road side verges searching for small rodents.’
      • ‘One of the options is to put double white lines down which would preclude people from parking on the road and the grass verges.’
      • ‘These days the Trace is a bitumen road, grass verges neatly manicured and mowed for mile after funereal mile.’
      • ‘Fortunately, in those days, roadside verges were clear of overhanging tree branches.’
      • ‘Their car hit the nearside verge, and came to rest in the middle lane.’
      • ‘The roadside verges and hedgerows also came in for favourable comment from the judges.’
      • ‘I climbed over the safety barrier and sat on the grassy, hilly verge to wait.’
      • ‘Ray Darcy was responsible for cutting the road verges and hedges on the approach roads to the village.’
      • ‘Mr Hocaniuk, 24, broke hard and steered to avoid the collision, ending up on a grass verge by the side of the road.’
      • ‘The Escort was being driven south along the 30 mph stretch, when it mounted a grass verge alongside the road.’
      • ‘It's a wooded area with quiet roads and grass verges, a perfect spot to walk dogs.’
      • ‘The dog, nicknamed John, appeared on the grass verge by the side of the road in the main street through the village.’
      • ‘The complex of ranch buildings spreads across a grassy verge above a tumbling creek.’
      • ‘At one point, an eye-witness saw it throw up dirt and grass from the nearside verge.’
      • ‘If we don't cut the grass verges, no-one else will.’
      • ‘Overgrown grass verges will be cut back after councils backtracked over the service.’
      • ‘This happened on a straight, single-lane gravel road with a grass verge.’
      • ‘People also got out in November and planted thousands of daffodils along the road verges.’
      • ‘What sort of machine is used to cut the grass verges?’
      • ‘Over 45 sites were tackled this year including road verges and loch sides.’
      edge, border, margin, side, brink, rim, lip, limit, boundary, outskirts, perimeter, periphery, borderline, frontier
      View synonyms
    3. 1.3Architecture An edge of tiles projecting over a gable.
      • ‘Only if society is on the verge of collapse can a communist revolution succeed.’
      • ‘The poor condition of that tiling and the defective mortar to the verge tiling generally warranted further investigation, in Mr Bruce's opinion.’

verb

[NO OBJECT]verge on
  • Approach (something) closely; be close or similar to (something)

    ‘despair verging on the suicidal’
    • ‘‘The Arabs have been driven into a state verging on despair; and the present unrest is no more than an expression of that despair’.’
    • ‘Stuart MacGill, Warne's replacement, is a perfectly-good bowler, but he struggled, so much so that his body language often verged on despair.’
    tend towards, incline to, incline towards, border on, approach, near, come near, be close to, be near to, touch on, be tantamount to, be more or less, be not far from, approximate to, resemble, be similar to
    View synonyms

Origin

Late Middle English: via Old French from Latin virga ‘rod’. The current verb sense dates from the late 18th century.

Pronunciation

verge

/vərdʒ//vərj/

Main definitions of verge in English

: verge1verge2verge3

verge2

noun

  • A wand or rod carried before a bishop or dean as an emblem of office.

    • ‘‘I will carry on looking after the verges until they (the council) shoot me,’ he said.’

Origin

Late Middle English: from Latin virga ‘rod’.

Pronunciation

verge

/vərdʒ//vərj/

Main definitions of verge in English

: verge1verge2verge3

verge3

verb

  • no object , with adverbial of direction Incline in a certain direction or toward a particular state.

    ‘his style verged into the art nouveau school’
    • ‘‘We are fast verging toward anarchy and confusion,’ he wrote.’
    • ‘If full, then verge south of start, lots down at Bonfield Gill half a mile from start.’
    • ‘Folds are commonly asymmetric, and verge to the south or SE.’
    • ‘If that were so, it would be tempting to dismiss these poems as mere word-play, verging toward nonsense.’
    • ‘Driving into London overnight from deep in the countryside is an experience verging close to the surreal.’
    • ‘This is not yet treasonable talk, though it verged close enough for Eliot to be sent to the Tower.’
    • ‘The ambition of such a project verges towards the arrogant.’

Origin

Early 17th century (in the sense ‘descend to the horizon’): from Latin vergere ‘to bend, incline’.

Pronunciation

verge

/vərdʒ//vərj/