Definition of venom in English:

venom

noun

  • 1A poisonous substance secreted by animals such as snakes, spiders, and scorpions and typically injected into prey or aggressors by biting or stinging.

    • ‘Patients with bites from snakes with neurotoxic venom should be observed for at least 24 hours.’
    • ‘Blood tests showed that he died of spider venom poisoning.’
    • ‘Are there special properties in tarantula venom that other spiders might not have?’
    • ‘Is it true that there is a new treatment for brain tumors involving scorpion venom?’
    • ‘In conclusion, whole honeybee venom was found to suppress arthritic inflammation in the rat.’
    • ‘A number of researchers have suggested that venom toxins are modified saliva proteins.’
    • ‘Ricin is twice as deadly as cobra venom and there is no known antidote.’
    • ‘In addition, they differ in their binding ability to proteinases in crude snake venoms.’
    • ‘Inside the beans of the castor plant is a toxin seven times more deadly than cobra venom.’
    • ‘He noted that bee venom could be poisonous to both animals and humans.’
    • ‘He watched as it pierced through the protection and injected its venom.’
    • ‘But for children with insect venom allergy, an insect bite can cause more severe symptoms.’
    • ‘Males have hollow spurs connected to venom glands on the ankle of each hind leg.’
    • ‘Cobra attacks its prey by spitting poisonous venom called neurotoxin.’
    • ‘Stingrays have a spine at the base of their tail that contains a venom gland.’
    • ‘Centipedes' modified front legs are poison claws, which they use to inject a highly toxic venom.’
    • ‘There are approximately 2,000 species of scorpions; of those, only around 40 to 50 contain deadly venom.’
    • ‘Amazingly, one of the toxins resembles an enzyme found in potent snake venoms.’
    • ‘The dragon has wounded him, and his poisonous venom is killing the brave Beowulf.’
    • ‘Do all populations of Mojave rattlesnakes have neurotoxic venom?’
    poison, toxin
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    1. 1.1 Extreme malice and bitterness shown in someone's attitudes, speech, or actions.
      ‘his voice was full of venom’
      • ‘The woman glared up at Natasha with pure venom and hatred in her dark green eyes.’
      • ‘Elizabeth, learning of his dislike, makes it a point to match his disgust with her own venom.’
      • ‘Adrianne spat, venom dripping from her words.’
      • ‘But the debates were good ones and, on the whole, discussions were held without rancour or venom.’
      • ‘Gabrielle looked up from her book and shot him a look of pure venom.’
      • ‘They were filled with such venom and hatred that Bryan was even too stunned to respond.’
      • ‘Pure venom shone in her eyes before she whipped around splashing through the water.’
      • ‘Her voice was full of venom, and there was a very large hint that she did not like her job.’
      • ‘His eyes filled with cold, deadly venom, and a short snarl escaped his lips.’
      • ‘That's why our country is in the mess it is in right now, even our so-called religious leaders are full of venom.’
      • ‘Here is a man who was supposedly praying one minute and spewing venom the next.’
      • ‘Father Malachi spoke with venom in his voice that Judy would be jealous of.’
      • ‘She shot Leonard a look of pure venom as she turned for the exit.’
      • ‘Let them be shielded from the shafts of malice, and protected against the venom of personal vituperation.’
      • ‘When did I stop liking people, and begin to hate them with such venom?’
      • ‘My answer came with such venom dripping from every word, I surprised myself.’
      • ‘His eyes flickered to Leopold, erasing any doubt that his comment had been full of venom.’
      • ‘Pity to waste good viper venom on an audience of one.’
      • ‘Once again Grace spoke quietly, with absolutely no venom or malice, or any emotion at all.’
      • ‘There wasn't enough venom in my voice to make the question an accusation.’
      rancour, malevolence, vitriol, spite, spitefulness, vindictiveness, malice, maliciousness, malignity, malignancy, viciousness, nastiness, ill will, ill feeling, animosity, animus, acrimony, acrimoniousness, bitterness, embitterment, embitteredness, sourness, resentment, grudgingness, virulence, antagonism, hostility, bad blood, bile, spleen, gall, enmity, hate, hatred, dislike, antipathy, aversion
      View synonyms

Origin

Middle English: from Old French venim, variant of venin, from an alteration of Latin venenum ‘poison’.

Pronunciation

venom

/ˈvɛnəm//ˈvenəm/