Main definitions of veer in English

: veer1veer2

veer1

verb

  • 1no object , with adverbial of direction Change direction suddenly.

    ‘an oil tanker that had veered off course’
    • ‘Suddenly the path veered sharply to the right and up the side of the mountain.’
    • ‘The researchers noted that the helicopters stayed impressively true to the calculated flight paths, never veering more than 12-inches off course.’
    • ‘The marker posts lead under power lines to a hawthorn tree, where the path veers right, towards the ridge.’
    • ‘That's when we veered off course and nose-dived thousands of feet.’
    • ‘She died after her Ford Fiesta was hit by a truck that veered into her path, an inquest heard yesterday.’
    • ‘We traveled eight days along the main road before veering away from our fellow travelers onto a smaller path heading north towards the Silver Crossings.’
    • ‘One can veer off the main paths into gorgeous, overgrown woodland areas.’
    • ‘Suddenly, the helicopter veered from its course and started climbing.’
    • ‘We were on a boat tour when the captain dramatically veered off course, frantically talking on his cell phone.’
    • ‘Early reports suggest he was running down Bradshawgate when he suddenly veered into the road into the path of the police vehicle, which had its blue lights flashing and siren wailing.’
    • ‘So we shouldn't be surprised that she veered off course and didn't go the way that we originally thought that she was going to go.’
    • ‘Suddenly something went wrong with her steering, and she veered sharply into the path of one of the convoy's escort trawlers.’
    • ‘Dusk was gathering over the North Sligo landscape as the plane veered off course from its intended flight to Derry.’
    • ‘They were unaware that the jet had suddenly and inexplicably veered off course.’
    • ‘At about 12 pm the driver of a blue Renault was travelling into Seend when he lost control of the car and veered into the path of a Land Rover travelling in the opposite direction.’
    • ‘The Subaru then veered across the road and hit a telegraph pole, eventually becoming lodged between the pole and a tree.’
    • ‘The island was directly in the path of the hurricane which devastated neighbouring Grenada, but was spared at the last minute when it suddenly veered off course.’
    • ‘But at the launch an on-board computer cut the rocket's engines when a first-stage rocket failed, causing it to veer off course.’
    • ‘After this the path veers right, away from the river.’
    • ‘Powell, 20, was giving two girls a lift home when he drove too fast on a bend and suddenly veered across the road.’
    swerve, career, skew, swing, sheer, weave, wheel
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 Suddenly change an opinion, subject, type of behavior, etc.
      ‘the conversation eventually veered away from theatrical things’
      • ‘Eyes everywhere watched me, conversations hesitating, veering off in new directions as Mai and I entered.’
      • ‘In the show - running at the Tamarind Theatre in Los Angeles - Key veers from humor to tears to outrage in the blink of an eye.’
      • ‘The weather changes every five minutes, veering from sunshine to blizzards and back.’
      • ‘He would shout things out excitedly, or suddenly veer off the subject, or even run forward and violently shake a bored student.’
      • ‘When questioning veers anywhere near these subjects he makes it clear he's fed up of talking about it.’
      • ‘Charlie veered away from that topic of conversation, not feeling the need to talk about it anymore.’
      • ‘Her Scottish accent is absolutely terrible, veering alarmingly between Australian, Irish and Robin Williams in Mrs Doubtfire.’
      • ‘Althoff's paintings are eerily beautiful, displaying delicate mastery of line, color and form, while their subjects veer toward the strange and macabre.’
      • ‘Packard's tone sometimes veers toward the self-congratulatory, but in this case, it somehow seems justified.’
      • ‘With no end in sight, Li veers between optimism and despair.’
      • ‘They veer away from discussion, change the subject, or even ask openly if we can stop talking about whatever-it-is because it makes them too uncomfortable.’
      • ‘This conversation was veering off the original topic, and onto the one Lauren was afraid it would come to.’
      • ‘Elsewhere in the cast, Justin Theroux plays Drew Barrymore's old boyfriend: an Irish gangster with an accent veering wildly from Glasgow to Dublin via Los Angeles.’
      • ‘Her opinions, too, arguably veer from the eminently sensible to the inexplicable.’
      • ‘The conversation veered towards language and accents.’
      • ‘In later years Dave's politics veered in an anarchist direction.’
      • ‘His mood could change in an instant and he would keep veering off the topic of conversation, forgetting what they had been talking about.’
      • ‘It veers from Northern to Southern often within the same sentence.’
      • ‘Occasionally Chef Wan veers off the subject of food altogether and breaks into a rant on, say, family values.’
      • ‘Shane veered the subject off course and Andrew felt a rush of gratitude.’
    2. 1.2 (of the wind) change direction clockwise around the points of the compass.
      ‘the wind veered southwest’
      The opposite of back
      • ‘At this stage it looks like we'll just get gale force winds tonight (unless it veers to the south), but nothing too destructive.’
      • ‘As we arrived at the river, the cold easterly gale had veered to a light westerly breeze with a touch of warmth in it, perfect for river trouting.’
      • ‘The race began in a fresh south-westerly wind, which soon veered to the west and then swung round to the north before virtually dying away altogether.’
      • ‘The wind veers far enough to the east to take the boat along the north coast to Islas Margaritas, a pair of vertical rocky islands with a natural arch big enough to take the boat through sideways.’
      • ‘At sunset, the wind freshened and veered to the north.’

noun

  • A sudden change of direction.

    • ‘What had seemed at the time like an unexpected veer off into uncharted territory ultimately proved to be an anomaly as Henson returned to much safer and more familiar ground in subsequent series.’
    • ‘In particular, Sword wants to discover what triggers the insects' specific movements - a sudden veer or turn or an increase in speed, for example.’

Origin

Late 16th century: from French virer, perhaps from an alteration of Latin gyrare (see gyrate).

Pronunciation

veer

/vɪr//vir/

Main definitions of veer in English

: veer1veer2

veer2

verb

[WITH OBJECT]Nautical
dated
  • Slacken or let out (a rope or cable) in a controlled way.

Origin

Late Middle English: from Middle Dutch vieren.

Pronunciation

veer

/vɪr//vir/