Definition of varnish in English:

varnish

noun

  • 1Resin dissolved in a liquid for applying on wood, metal, or other materials to form a hard, clear, shiny surface when dry.

    • ‘Both cabins have redwood siding that appears to have been given a clear coat of varnish or shellac.’
    • ‘For thousands of years most paints and varnishes were made with hemp seed oil or linseed. as both make very good bases and can hold pigments really well.’
    • ‘Apply two, preferably three coats of urethane varnish using a good quality natural bristle brush.’
    • ‘The final stage of restoration is to apply a clear varnish - when appropriate.’
    • ‘No varnishes are applied either, the wood's glossy look is from being hand rubbed.’
    • ‘The plate is then removed, and the wax or varnish removed by a solvent.’
    • ‘I have found that these ornaments only last in dry conditions, even when coated well with varnish or shellac.’
    • ‘Then he repeatedly applies furniture varnish or stain which he wipes away with turpentine and reapplies to darken the edges of the work.’
    • ‘Once a year every detail is painted with a thick, clear coat of marine-grade varnish to protect it from weathering.’
    • ‘It was also incorporated into a broad range of industrial products, including lubricants, insecticides, paints, and varnishes.’
    • ‘Oil varnishes consist of a polymer (natural or synthetic) dissolved in an oil.’
    • ‘Sealers are usually thinned varnishes which, when applied to wood, penetrate into the wood pores on the surface.’
    • ‘Do not apply urethane varnish over a coat of shellac or lacquer.’
    • ‘Two or more coats of clear gloss varnish will give you the traditional shiny, lacquered finish.’
    • ‘Let dry overnight, then apply two coats of clear polyurethane varnish.’
    • ‘We first prepared the boards by sanding the wooden surface to remove any varnish.’
    • ‘The rockers were made of wood, their dark varnish scuffed and scraped.’
    • ‘Paints and varnishes are designed, of course, to adhere permanently and evenly to a surface.’
    • ‘When the piece is dry, sand it lightly and apply one coat of acrylic varnish to protect the finish.’
    • ‘Lots of glue was used to fix this all in place, and over the top of all this a few layers of varnish or shellac were applied to finally seal the whole thing.’
    lacquer, lac, shellac, japan, enamel, glaze, polish, oil, resin, wax
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1archaic [in singular] An external or superficially attractive appearance of a specific quality.
      ‘an outward varnish of civilization’
      • ‘It would take a lot more than suggesting Lincoln was gay to strip some of the varnish off of his image.’
      • ‘Extremist impulses have acquired a varnish of respectability through the intercession of the socialist leaders.’
      • ‘It was reduced to the purely decorative art of whether or not to put the varnish of international approval on a decision already made.’
      • ‘If we are to develop a more realistic sense of place we will need to strip the varnish from some cherished myths about our island world.’
      • ‘Presumably the point would have been to make certain of the sinister police chief's demise, while putting a varnish of legality on it later on.’

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • 1 Apply varnish to.

    ‘we stripped the floor and varnished it’
    • ‘He was going to varnish the new pine doors but he was already reeling from the fumes from the paint.’
    • ‘The two bedrooms have varnished flooring and Velux windows, while the larger of the two also has exposed ceiling beams.’
    • ‘The entrance hall of this attractive terraced property has a varnished pitch pine floor as well as recessed brass spotlights.’
    • ‘Tomkins notes that Picasso did not varnish his own paintings.’
    • ‘When the city was financially strapped in the early 1980s, Mr. Benson came to the office one weekend and sanded and varnished his own desk to cut costs.’
    • ‘Belt sanders are relatively inexpensive to hire and while sanding and varnishing floors is tough work, buyers will love the results.’
    • ‘‘It has been varnished, which was a Victorian practice they thought would preserve valuables, but it now means we can't distinguish the varnish from the bone,’ he said.’
    • ‘The chairs are all pinkish and soft from massive amounts of use, and the tables are nicely varnished, but not entirely pristine.’
    • ‘Then the paintings are varnished several times and polished to a glasslike surface.’
    • ‘Well crafted, watertight wooden forms are essential, and Ando's forms are varnished to achieve the smooth finish.’
    • ‘We've even varnished it all over so that no splinter would hurt your flesh.’
    • ‘Daisy had a small cupboard made recently and I managed to get it varnished this morning.’
    • ‘They put back a fireplace into the dining room and laid an oak laminate floor in the lounge and sanded and varnished the floorboards in the bedrooms.’
    • ‘At the end of the paved path, wide, sweeping marble steps rose, leading up to a pair of solid, darkly varnished wooden doors.’
    • ‘Both rooms are painted in a rich red and have varnished pine floors, picture rails and attractive brick fireplaces.’
    • ‘There are two bedrooms upstairs, both with original cast iron fireplaces and varnished wooden floorboards.’
    • ‘The furniture was wood, polished to a high gloss rather than varnished.’
    • ‘Finally, we bought a thin oak-veneer board from Travis Perkins and varnished it to create a splashback.’
    • ‘Here wide varnished floorboards are set against rich yellow walls, more ornate plasterwork and a large cast-iron fireplace.’
    • ‘Angie stepped out, following her mother onto the newly varnished porch.’
    • ‘If you want to obtain a rustic country style, having plain varnished woodwork will achieve this.’
    • ‘The floors and banisters had been varnished and polished till they gleamed, the frames of paintings had received a thorough cleaning.’
    • ‘Steve Perry went back to the business of varnishing his deck.’
    lacquer, shellac, japan, enamel, glaze, polish, oil, resin, wax
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 Disguise or gloss over (a fact)
      ‘the White House is varnishing over the defeat of the president's proposal’
      • ‘John Fahey tried to varnish over the problems by citing family and work commitments as the reason for the poor turnout at a recent training session.’
      • ‘He doesn't varnish the facts because he doesn't have to.’

Origin

Middle English: from Old French vernis, from medieval Latin veronix fragrant resin, sandarac or medieval Greek berenikē, probably from Berenice, a town in Cyrenaica.

Pronunciation:

varnish

/ˈvärniSH/