Definition of variety in English:

variety

noun

  • 1The quality or state of being different or diverse; the absence of uniformity, sameness, or monotony.

    ‘it's the variety that makes my job so enjoyable’
    • ‘Unlike me, some people really do prefer uniformity to variety, regardless of cost.’
    • ‘Concentration of media power in too few hands not only can lead to higher prices for consumers but can hurt variety and quality of programming.’
    • ‘Digital radio promised lower costs, higher quality and more variety.’
    • ‘The Northern Mockingbird is known and loved for the quality and variety of its song.’
    • ‘With improved packaging came improved quality and variety of meals.’
    • ‘The survey found that a lack of variety and poor nutritional quality of foods limits shoppers' ability to eat healthfully.’
    • ‘The exhibition is aimed at showing the public the quality and variety of Architectural work throughout Ireland.’
    • ‘But more importantly, it probably means we'll see an increase in the quantity, quality and variety of free online content.’
    • ‘A smaller pool of people can mean less diversity, less variety and less dynamism.’
    • ‘A regular festival-goer, he still rates Glastonbury as the best UK festival for both variety and quality of food.’
    • ‘The craving for variety rather than for quality is one of the chief causes of England's being Europe's gastronomic sump.’
    • ‘The diet has improved in quality and variety, with modern supermarkets offering imported foods.’
    • ‘Visitors said they wanted greater variety and better quality at a reasonable price.’
    • ‘Customers are getting snobbier about their teas and are demanding better quality and wider variety.’
    • ‘Many attendees said they appreciated the quality and variety of exhibitors, lectures and seminars.’
    • ‘In Spain, there is now a robust supply of both Moroccan hashish and homegrown marijuana of increasing variety and quality.’
    • ‘In recent years scientists have been struck by the diversity and variety of objects found in the solar system.’
    • ‘Waterford City has become noted in recent years for the quality and variety of its new and renewed streetscapes.’
    • ‘This added yet more variety and nutritional diversity to the diet.’
    • ‘However, what the restaurant lacks in variety it more than makes up for in quality.’
    diversity, variation, diversification, multifariousness, heterogeneity, variegation, many-sidedness, change, difference
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1a variety of A number or range of things of the same general class that are different or distinct in character or quality.
      ‘the center offers a variety of leisure activities’
      • ‘The money raised from the carnival will be distributed to a variety of local good causes.’
      • ‘I now have to buy all my food from Tesco, when I'd rather choose from a variety of shops.’
      • ‘Record sales are down for a variety of reasons, and consumers are in open revolt.’
      • ‘We were hoping to open much sooner, but for a variety of reasons the opening has been delayed.’
      • ‘There is now a wide range of ethical and green funds operating in a variety of ways.’
      • ‘Individuals offered votive gifts on a variety of occasions and not only in times of crisis.’
      • ‘Instead, there are a variety of different genes which appear to be linked to the disease.’
      • ‘It is five miles from St Andrews and a similar distance from a variety of beaches and scenic towns.’
      • ‘The evidence comes, as I have said, from a variety of sources.’
      • ‘Sea temperatures are measured in a variety of ways and to varying degrees of accuracy.’
      • ‘As soon as we had ordered, a young waiter whipped round and plied us with a variety of fresh bread.’
      • ‘Stallholders offered a variety of goods and a range of arts and crafts were on display.’
      • ‘Training days will be held during late April and May at a variety of places across the county.’
      • ‘Most of us end up with a number of pensions accumulated over the years from a variety of employers.’
      • ‘She is a good teacher and varies the exercises we do so I have a variety of different things to tackle.’
      • ‘However he has had a variety of different roles with a range of responsibilities.’
      • ‘Human behavior is especially difficult to study because it can be influenced by a wide variety of factors.’
      • ‘His work draws upon a variety of influences ranging from travel to music and film.’
      • ‘The panelists generally favored sites that offered the greatest variety of products.’
      • ‘The popular beauty spot is home to a variety of wildlife including birds and types of bats.’
      assortment, miscellany, range, array, collection, selection, line-up, mixture, medley, mixed bag, mix, diversity, multiplicity, motley, motley collection, pot-pourri
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    2. 1.2 A thing which differs in some way from others of the same general class or sort; a type.
      ‘fifty varieties of fresh and frozen pasta’
      • ‘Many people buy soup instead, now that supermarkets stock a wider and more adventurous range of fresh and canned varieties.’
      • ‘Several rural and urban working-class varieties of Scots coexist with rural and urban middle class varieties.’
      • ‘Early flowering varieties have been blooming for a few weeks and their later flowering relatives will gradually join them.’
      • ‘Today a wide range of fresh varieties such as plum, cherry and vine tomatoes are readily available.’
      • ‘Small firms generally come in two varieties: family-run or entrepreneur-led.’
      • ‘The apples must be of a variety approved by the appellation, freshly picked (which means no concentrates) and actually grown in the Pays d' Auge region.’
      • ‘Municipal bonds come in two varieties: general obligation bonds and revenue bonds.’
      • ‘Merlot is Bordeaux's most planted black grape variety, and has been enjoying unaccustomed popularity elsewhere.’
      • ‘One of the world's oldest plants and a magnificent twisted tree are among nine varieties of exotic new plants at Sheffield's Winter Garden.’
      • ‘In general, more varieties may be grown in the milder climate of southern Missouri.’
      • ‘Generally, white varieties of onion are chosen, purely for reasons of appearance.’
      • ‘New varieties generally last only five to seven years before they are replaced.’
      • ‘The general results indicated native varieties were superior to the foreign ones.’
      • ‘School children from across the region have helped Forestry Commission rangers to plant tree varieties including oak, holly and alder.’
      • ‘Our waitress came round with good fresh bread, three or four varieties, then two fresh shell on prawns each to nibble on.’
      • ‘Through it, thousands of Americans were introduced to dance, albeit of the music hall variety.’
      • ‘The many varieties of guitar that abound in the regional folk musics of Latin America are all adaptations of European models.’
      • ‘Under the heading of Yorkshire Garden World Pies, with fresh herbs, two varieties were on offer.’
      • ‘As a cheaper alternative, the following wines are made by Burgundian winemakers using the traditional grape varieties already featured.’
      • ‘‘Mmm,’ I said, munching away at a small slice of the rhubarb pie I'd been obliged to buy in the absence of the apple variety.’
      sort, kind, type, class, category, classification, style, description, status, quality, nature, manner, design, shape, form, pattern, group, set, bracket, genre, species, rank, genus, family, order, breed, race, strain, generation, vintage, make, model, brand, stamp, ilk, kidney, cast, grain, mould
      View synonyms
    3. 1.3 A form of television or theater entertainment consisting of a series of different types of acts, such as singing, dancing, and comedy.
      as modifier ‘a variety show’
      ‘in 1937 she did another season of variety’
      • ‘Archie performs his moth-eaten variety act before dwindling audiences in dog-eared music hall theatres.’
      • ‘Concert parties at the time improvised with available talent and material to provide variety revues involving light-hearted music and comedy.’
      • ‘The forties and fifties found her stealing the limelight in a series of successful West End revues in addition to entertaining the forces, appearing in variety and cabaret performances.’
      • ‘During the 1950s, I danced regularly on television variety shows.’
      • ‘Also on offer are variety entertainment, solo singing and dance.’
      • ‘Music hall and variety were replaced in the public fancy by cinema after 1918.’
      • ‘For anyone who loves a bit of traditional entertainment, in the form of a music hall or variety night, the return of a popular show will be welcome.’
      • ‘Tony Charmoli, a pioneer and innovator during the days of variety television, received a Career Achievement Award.’
      • ‘She was, therefore, forced to accept anything offered, tours, pantomimes, weeks with repertory companies and variety tours.’
      • ‘The next variety concert will take place at the Lakeside Hotel on Wednesday, August 25.’
      • ‘With a London debut in 1891, he quickly established a successful career in music-hall, variety, pantomime, revue, operetta, and musical comedy.’
      • ‘Simon Gross has worked extensively in theatre, television, cabaret and variety.’
      • ‘Stagecoach will mount a Christmas show of music, variety, poetry and comedy in Trinity Methodist Church in the week before Christmas.’
      • ‘A standard radio studio of that era could be a very intimidating place, and a theatre would create a much better atmosphere for radio comedy, variety shows or quizzes.’
      • ‘She took him to variety theatre and they saw every Crazy Gang show there was.’
      • ‘But fashions changed and variety entertainment dwindled in popularity.’
      • ‘He appeared on stage in many variety concerts and was a wonderful MC.’
      • ‘Of course, as a result of this I ended up singing on television variety shows along with Dinah Shore, Perry Como, Pat Boone, even Ethel Merman!’
      • ‘They sing, they dance, they act in major variety shows and dramas and other TV specials as extras and sometimes as part of the main cast.’
      • ‘The variety concert will include a host of artists and school brass bands.’
  • 2Biology
    A taxonomic category that ranks below subspecies (where present) or species, its members differing from others of the same subspecies or species in minor but permanent or heritable characteristics. Varieties are more often recognized in botany, in which they are designated in the style "Apium graveolens var. dulce".

    Compare with form (sense 2 of the noun) and subspecies
    • ‘Viola is represented by 25 species, two additional subspecies, and five varieties.’
    • ‘The existence of such variation creates problems in distinguishing between taxa at the level of species and varieties.’
    • ‘Martynova described 23 species and varieties of Cyrtospirifer from the Famennian of Kazakhstan.’
    • ‘Taxa recognized within this genus include sections, species, and varieties.’
    • ‘At least 66 individual species and varieties, representing 25 genera were identified.’
    1. 2.1 A cultivated form of a plant.
      • ‘Cultivars, or varieties bred from the vine, account for nearly all of the wine produced today.’
      • ‘Cultivated varieties generally differ greatly from wild genotypes of the same closely related species.’
      • ‘Most of the bulbs we plant in our gardens are cultivated varieties, raised in nurseries in this country or in the Netherlands.’
      • ‘For farmers the focus was on some of the latest developments in producing hybrid varieties of vegetables and fruits.’
      • ‘Concerns about pesticide use have led breeders to develop broccoli varieties with natural resistance to downy mildew.’
    2. 2.2 A plant or animal which varies in some trivial respect from its immediate parent or type.

Phrases

  • variety is the spice of life

    • proverb New and exciting experiences make life more interesting.

      • ‘You may have a passion for one kind of wine or another, but variety is the spice of life with wine, so shop around for different styles.’
      • ‘Don't force children to eat and remember, variety is the spice of life.’
      • ‘Some differences will persist but then variety is the spice of life.’
      • ‘Most people would agree that variety is the spice of life, and that includes sex.’
      • ‘The next evening I pulled the same stunt with a completely different person, variety being the spice of life.’
      • ‘Some say variety is the spice of life, and when it comes to breakfast I have to agree with them.’
      • ‘You know what they say about variety being the spice of life.’
      • ‘Then again he is very broadminded in his musical taste which is a good thing really I suppose - variety is the spice of life and all that.’
      • ‘Well, they do say variety is the spice of life, I suppose.’
      • ‘The old adage that variety is the spice of life still holds true!’

Origin

Late 15th century: from French variété or Latin varietas, from varius (see various).

Pronunciation

variety

/vəˈrīədē//vəˈraɪədi/