Definition of vantage in English:

vantage

(also vantage point)

noun

  • A place or position affording a good view of something.

    ‘from my vantage point I could see into the front garden’
    figurative ‘the past is continuously reinterpreted from the vantage point of the present’
    • ‘It is thought they fired on the cars from a secret vantage point on nearby hills.’
    • ‘From our vantage point, at the northernmost edge of the storms, the view was phenomenal.’
    • ‘His new companion looked great but from my vantage point I could see the grey roots of her dyed hair.’
    • ‘Many people have extolled the extraordinary and stunning views from this vantage point.’
    • ‘From my vantage point and with the sun on my back I watched the goings on in the garden.’
    • ‘Late morning on the terrace at the smart Ritz Carlton Hotel is the perfect vantage for watching the marina come to life.’
    • ‘From her vantage, Charlie observed Mike and Sandra Weston exchange loving glances across the lawn.’
    • ‘From the isolated vantage point of his room he uses an old pair of opera glasses to spy on a young woman across the street.’
    • ‘From his vantage point on the 22nd floor he can see an awful lot of London.’
    • ‘The fireworks looked excellent from our vantage point in the Castle Terrace car park.’
    • ‘The village is built on top of a relatively large hill, and represents a perfect vantage from which the windswept and rain-fed beauty of the surrounding landscape can be seen.’
    • ‘From the vantage of our laboratory at the University of Massachusetts in Amherst, the eye can wander over the majestic landscape of the Connecticut River Valley.’
    • ‘From her vantage point she could see the entire street in front of the apartment complex.’
    • ‘From the same vantage, I could also see more bikes than I could count, two couples boating the canal and a tram train jammed full of people.’
    • ‘I thought I'd get out and view some more of the capital from the best vantage point of all, the top deck of a London bus.’
    • ‘Yet the report provides a broader vantage from which to assess such advances.’
    • ‘Anne prefers to survey the garden from a vantage point under the mango trees, overlooking the dam.’
    • ‘From her vantage upon the cliff, she could see the lights of the town where she had once lived.’
    • ‘Viewed from this vantage point, the church sits at the far corner of the square.’
    • ‘I have found a vantage half-a-mile down the course, close to where the trail takes a sharp right onto the frozen Yukon River.’

Origin

Middle English: from Anglo-Norman French, shortening of Old French avantage ‘advantage’.

Pronunciation

vantage

/ˈvæn(t)ɪdʒ//ˈvan(t)ij/