Definition of utterance in English:

utterance

noun

  • 1A spoken word, statement, or vocal sound.

    • ‘His every move and utterance will be scrutinised and analysed.’
    • ‘What we get now is a Leader who has been so thoroughly media managed that every utterance is an opportunity to ‘establish and reiterate key messages’.’
    • ‘At times like this, as we grope to express our feelings, we all tend to fall back on the simplest of utterances.’
    • ‘Her utterances and observations captivate him.’
    • ‘The rest of the book supports and explains this cryptic utterance.’
    • ‘For this dangerous utterance she received a ten-year sentence.’
    • ‘His bizarre word rhythm and gleeful disregard for punctuation makes even his most banal utterances sound dramatic.’
    • ‘Nobody understands a word I say, my every utterance greeted with blank looks.’
    • ‘Here is what the Spanish Prime Minister-elect had to say in virtually his first public utterance following the election.’
    • ‘Like most seasoned politics-watchers, I had assumed that behind her every utterance was a calculating, self-advancing steel-eyed operator.’
    • ‘The new coach gives little away in his facial manner or public utterances.’
    • ‘My reaction to that utterance led to an open and scorching debate.’
    • ‘His most important utterance on the subject came in a speech in Indianapolis in July 1999.’
    • ‘Instead, public utterances are invariably dictated by self-interest, political expediency, and/or ideology.’
    • ‘So often we are subjected to erroneous and incorrect statements and irresponsible utterances from ignorant and unauthorised sources.’
    • ‘Currency traders around the world were listening to every utterance by the Federal Reserve Chairman on where the world's most powerful economy was heading.’
    • ‘There can be no question that the church assumed itself capable of authoritative prophetic utterances.’
    • ‘Presently, the agency can only fine broadcast stations up to $27, 500 per utterance and have to warn the individuals who violate the rules before a penalty can be imposed.’
    • ‘His most sensible utterance came when he insisted: ‘Our children need to understand, at home and at school, that life is not always fair and that it will, from time to time, deal them hard blows.’’
    • ‘Our advice is that they should avoid negative utterances in their speeches and be careful in their deeds.’
    remark, comment, word, expression, statement, observation, declaration, pronouncement
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1The action of saying or expressing something aloud.
      ‘the simple utterance of a few platitudes’
      • ‘It's what every mother dreams of, next to hearing that first utterance of ma-ma and the later cooing of I love you at early ages.’
      • ‘Faith is not just the utterance of words, however, but a firm belief and conviction with one's mind and heart.’
      • ‘The months of pain and anguish all came flooding back to her with the utterance of that one word.’
      • ‘Speech (the utterance of a well-formed sentence in a particular situation) establishes three kinds of relation to reality.’
      • ‘Blatant cheating is considered less offensive than the utterance of odious words.’
      • ‘Only at this time of year can you truly claim to have been touched by the cold magic that is invoked by the mere utterance of the word ‘Alaska’.’
      • ‘He said that lawmakers should be extremely vigilant about foul language ‘for the light utterance of shameful words leads soon to shameful actions.’’
      • ‘Each and every further utterance of these feeble claims, simply illustrates the ignorance and contempt in which these people view the military.’
      • ‘One definition of singing is' the utterance of words or sounds in tuneful succession '.’
      • ‘The mere utterance of the word liberal is now met by scorn and derision.’
    2. 1.2Linguistics
      An uninterrupted chain of spoken or written language.
      • ‘Any utterance, in these languages, must terminate in a vowel, and adjacent consonants are disallowed.’
      • ‘Spoken utterances are composed of a sequence of a rather small number of unit sounds.’
      • ‘These kinds of utterances are normal everyday instances of language use for the individuals concerned.’
      • ‘Adjacency pairs are patterns of two successive utterances, spoken by different speakers, in which the second part of the adjacency pair is relevant and expectable.’
      • ‘Grammarians and purists put far more stock in ‘logical’ usage than empirical evidence suggests is supported by actual utterances.’

Pronunciation:

utterance

/ˈədərəns/