Definition of ursine in US English:

ursine

adjective

  • Relating to or resembling bears.

    • ‘He discovered at that moment a bond between himself and his ursine brothers and decided to devote his life to protecting them.’
    • ‘A seasonal ranger stationed at Lake, an area whose jurisdiction included the Fishing Bridge campground, explained that the campground's ursine visitors would be trapped and relocated three times and then were dispatched.’
    • ‘Unlike their ursine cousins who will eat almost anything, Giant Pandas, as you probably know, basically eat one thing: bamboo stems and leaves.’
    • ‘After black-bear attacks left two women dead last spring, one question lingers: Were the tragedies rare coincidences or signs of a terrifying new trend in ursine behavior?’
    • ‘Still, as hikers, climbers, and canoeists fan out across the backcountry this spring - just as hungry black bears emerge from hibernation - they will do well to arm themselves with recent research on ursine behavior.’
    • ‘The divergence relationship among ursine bears was not resolved with any of the molecular data sets with the exception of the affirmation of the close affinity of the brown bear and the polar bear.’
    • ‘One dog, a yellow curly-tailed female named Weasel, actually lives in one of the outdoor bear enclosures and eats dog food and rice right among the ursine giants.’
    • ‘So with bittersweet pride in our hearts, we watched our ursine companion quietly disappear into the woods.’
    • ‘Here are the association's tips for managing ursine visitors that may turn up in your yard.’
    • ‘For instance there has been a rise in ursine road fatalities, which is making quite a dent in the population.’
    • ‘Schullery observes that Lewis's tone, his narrative structure, and, indeed, his misperceptions about ursine psychology helped shape the telling of bear stories for decades to come.’
    • ‘First and foremost, it portrays a man in love with the animals and the wilderness, who has escaped a life of depression and alcohol addiction through his ursine obsession.’
    • ‘After years of cruel deprivation they seemed to be very contented in a grouchy, ursine, way.’

Origin

Mid 16th century: from Latin ursinus, from ursus ‘bear’.

Pronunciation

ursine

/ˈərˌsin//ˈərˌsɪn/