Definition of upsurge in English:

upsurge

noun

  • An upward surge in the strength or quantity of something; an increase.

    ‘an upsurge in violent crime’
    • ‘With crime down, the city was experiencing an unprecedented upsurge in population after decades of drift.’
    • ‘The placing of the one tax on land values would likewise result in an economic upsurge.’
    • ‘The attack came amid a major upsurge in violence across the country that has left a thousand dead.’
    • ‘Antique jewellery is another area where demand has seen an enormous upsurge in recent years.’
    • ‘He rejected claims that nightclubs are big contributors to an upsurge in drinking and street violence.’
    • ‘This increase in property market activity is clear from the latest lending figures which show an upsurge in the last few months.’
    • ‘In this area there was an upsurge of helicopter activity and foot patrols.’
    • ‘Rural areas are also reporting a boom in sales figures largely due to an upsurge in tourism because of the good summer.’
    • ‘An apparent upsurge in juvenile delinquency heightened concerns about teenagers.’
    • ‘One of the reasons for the recent upsurge of ethnic violence is to be found in the failure of modern states to separate warring factions.’
    • ‘Sadly there has been a recent upsurge in the number of preachers on the television asking for money.’
    • ‘If they do that, they say that yes there will be a sudden upsurge in violence but it will only be short-term.’
    • ‘Registration data highlights a recent upsurge in inflow of doctors to the country’
    • ‘The month of June has seen a big upsurge in visitors to the area.’
    • ‘Intercommunal fighting continued fitfully, with occasional upsurges of intense violence.’
    • ‘Fox argues that a new village development plan is needed to cater for the upsurge in interest in living in the area.’
    • ‘Analysts expect the collapse of peace talks to spark an upsurge in violence.’
    • ‘The recent upsurge in violence had forced a decision to cancel the scheduled tour, Merriman said.’
    • ‘In recent weeks there has been an upsurge in optimism about our economic prospects.’
    • ‘In a cyclical pattern, relatively secular periods have been followed by religious upsurges.’

Pronunciation:

upsurge

/ˈəpˌsərj/