Definition of upset price in English:

upset price


  • The lowest acceptable selling price for a property in an auction; a reserve price.

    • ‘Rod Christie, the agent, already has 57 viewings booked and believes that the house will significantly exceed the upset price.’
    • ‘It was marketed in 2002 with an upset price of £950,000.’
    • ‘There has already been a lot of interest in the house - days after being marketed a closing date was set, so despite its modest upset price, you can expect plenty of competition.’
    • ‘Once complete, a house such as this could be worth double the current upset price.’
    • ‘House prices in the town have been buoyant in recent times and this upset price appears conservative.’
    • ‘Usually, they end up not with the house of their dreams, as it sold for 40% over the upset price within days, but the house that will do, and even then they have to throw everything they have into the pot.’
    • ‘The £249,000 upset price also includes a host of Victorian features, with cornices, panelling and high ceilings, all furnished in a ‘potently romantic’ style with open fires and ‘lavish window treatments’.’
    • ‘I don't know whether our city planning development department was merely generous with its upset price or whether the department underestimated the property boom.’
    • ‘The offer exceeded the upset price of £50 000 and acceptance is subject to no objections to proposals for erection of a garage on the site.’
    • ‘Buy this for anything like the upset price, and you will be picking up a bargain.’


upset price

/ˈəpset ˌprīs/