Definition of uproar in English:

uproar

noun

  • 1A loud and impassioned noise or disturbance.

    ‘the room was in an uproar’
    ‘the assembly dissolved in uproar’
    • ‘There was an uproar in the audience while everyone tried to scream louder than the person next to him or her.’
    • ‘Suddenly, an uproar of shouts rang through the halls as both writers and editors alike came to see what was causing the commotion.’
    • ‘The uproar that followed was both spontaneous and tremendous.’
    turmoil, disorder, confusion, chaos, commotion, disturbance, tumult, turbulence, mayhem, pandemonium, havoc, bedlam, all hell broken loose
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    1. 1.1 A public expression of protest or outrage.
      ‘it caused an uproar in the press’
      • ‘Only after an uproar from the public did he begrudgingly give the chairman of the residents' committee a few minutes.’
      • ‘Workers at Swindon Pressings caused such an uproar at plans to scrap its annual Christmas trees that the company will now be putting them up.’
      • ‘We asked star Dennis Franz how the show was able to overcome the early uproar.’
      • ‘It took the intervention of the media, and the consequent uproar to stop what would have been a truly monumental blunder.’
      • ‘If this had happened to a prominent citizen, it surely would have created an uproar.’
      • ‘So I was surprised to read about the uproar it is causing.’
      • ‘In the late 1990s, the issue of potential mass sales of Canadian water to the U.S. caused an uproar.’
      • ‘Suddenly the public was in an uproar, and the producers in Hollywood took up their cause.’
      • ‘You well know how these kinds of issues can almost get a life of their own, in terms of creating an uproar.’
      • ‘It caused an uproar, as I thought it would, but many people realized later that it was the right thing to do.’
      • ‘All this at a time when the whole of Britain is in an uproar over obscene council tax rises and in a turmoil over pensions crises!’
      • ‘Accounts of this violence, made worse by exaggeration, created a national uproar.’
      • ‘Can any judge throw those statements out knowing what the uproar would be?’
      • ‘Amid the uproar that followed, a political trap was sprung.’
      • ‘This started an uproar of public debate, so the reporters went after Joshua again.’
      • ‘Or, perhaps they felt some guilt for the uproar that they had created in the first place.’
      • ‘Dr. Leaky started much of the uproar when he found his famous missing link, Lucy.’
      • ‘The city that pioneered free public libraries is facing uproar over plans to close one of its reading rooms.’
      • ‘He comments on being weighed down ‘with the burdens of pastoral care’ and ‘great tumultuous uproars in secular affairs’.’
      outcry, furore, outrage, howl of protest, protest, protestation, complaint, objection
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Origin

Early 16th century: from Middle Dutch uproer, from op up + roer confusion assimilated to roar.

Pronunciation:

uproar

/ˈəpˌrôr/