Definition of upfront in English:

upfront

adverb

informal
  • 1At the front; in front.

    ‘I was sitting up front’
    • ‘We controlled the game up front against a team that prides itself on being strong and physical.’
    • ‘The player is capable of inspiring his team and can play either in midfield or up front.’
    • ‘They can expect a tough encounter up front this week, but have the ability to pick up full points.’
    • ‘They had the scoring chances but lacked the strength and drive up front to take them.’
    • ‘We had a young team that did really well up front and I am really pleased at how they competed.’
    • ‘Gill in particular made a big difference up front and added a new dimension to the full forward line.’
    • ‘Customers wanting to use badminton courts or table tennis tables have been told they must pay up front.’
    • ‘She would have gone and sat by herself in the front, but it was so cold upfront.’
    • ‘We failed to score throughout the game despite our constant attacking force up front.’
    • ‘While Sutton looks just as comfortable in defence as he does up front, striker is his position.’
    • ‘David Healy may at last get his chance to play up front alongside Rob Hulse when Leeds take on Wolves tomorrow.’
    • ‘He was up front at a Clash gig and a girl cut him in the side of the head with a broken bottle.’
    • ‘There is plenty of competition for places up front even in the absence of the injured Andy Cole.’
    • ‘We need to be more composed as a team, both at the back and up front.’
    • ‘The coach is considering bringing in Colin Alcide up front in place of top scorer David McNiven.’
    • ‘We had two lads up front against three defenders and that made it very difficult.’
    • ‘The room was lit by a lamp, which was placed next to the meditation teacher, who was sitting up front beside a window.’
    • ‘At the moment, I think the strongest section of our squad would be up front.’
    • ‘He can play up front or across the midfield and will add an extra bite to the team and our performances.’
    • ‘He has recently moved back up front, scoring twice in City's last four games.’
    ahead, to the fore, at the fore, at the head, up ahead, at twelve o'clock, in the vanguard, in the van, in the lead, leading, coming first
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  • 2(of a payment) in advance.

    ‘the salesmen are paid commission up front’
    • ‘He'd waited five years on the list, and he'd needed to pay up front a year in advance.’
    • ‘Payment is up front and there is a choice between a damage waiver or a security deposit.’
    • ‘She had been paid up front, and she had carried out the task for which she had been paid.’
    • ‘This gent wants me to supply the funds up front to allow him to skidaddle out of the country.’
    • ‘If you choose to pay commission, you may not have to pay anything up front, but make sure you know what the rate is before you buy.’
    • ‘From here on in, he is going to ask for money up front before he works a cure on anyone.’
    • ‘The stamps would also have to be paid for up front, presenting a security and cash flow nightmare for all concerned.’
    • ‘However, many suppliers required payment upfront, which caused cashflow problems.’
    • ‘To secure funding for the vehicles, payment had to be made up front.’
    • ‘The budget is paid in a lump sum up front, so the practice knows where its money is coming from.’
    in advance, beforehand, ahead of time, in readiness
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adjective

informal
  • 1Bold, honest, and frank.

    ‘he'd been upfront about his intentions’
    • ‘The Daily Show is more trusted because they are up front about their biases.’
    • ‘I respect people who are up front with you if they have a problem and tell it to you to your face.’
    • ‘They were asked to support one another, to have conversations even when they were uncomfortable, and to be honest and upfront at all times.’
    • ‘But they were very honest and upfront about the conditions of moviemaking.’
    • ‘Maybe you should have told him up front that he wouldn't get any close-up photos?’
    • ‘Mr Milne deserves credit of a sort for having the courage to be up front about where he stands.’
    • ‘We are straightforward and upfront about the cost of our policies and how we would pay for them.’
    • ‘I would like to say up front that the following answers are my opinions.’
    • ‘I happen to know a cop personally, and she is (as far as I know) an honest and upfront person on and off the job.’
    • ‘We may not agree with her philosophy in life, but at least she's honest, and upfront with her views.’
    • ‘If every candidate was this upfront, the whole election process would be much more streamlined and less vicious.’
    • ‘And of course - I mean, they're very upfront about this.’
    • ‘The company, Ventracor, is upfront about its intentions.’
    • ‘It is best to be up front and acknowledge to the person that we do not know what to say but that we want to stand by them just the same.’
    • ‘That is a very serious matter, and I believe the Government owes it to its people to be honest and upfront.’
    • ‘We know where they're coming from, and they are at least up front about it.’
    • ‘He is right to be up front with the British people about the perils we face.’
    • ‘He said he understood, we shook hands and I felt I had acted with dignity and been up front and honest.’
    • ‘Somehow the moral do-gooders need to be by passed and honest, upfront information needs to be given at the right time.’
    • ‘This is the Prime Minister who is open, upfront, and accessible.’
    honest, frank, candid, open, truthful, sincere, on the level, honest-to-goodness
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  • 2attributive (of a payment) made in advance.

    • ‘It's to give them some up front money to make sure they can do the things they need to do.’
    • ‘The next day, O'Brien's solicitor sent a letter to another lawyer saying that the options being looked at by the department were either to have no upfront payment, or a maximum cap.’
    • ‘They are not cheap compared with traditional funds, which are moving towards abolishing upfront fees.’
    • ‘The minister has now given strong indications that he intends to propose a move to an Australian-type system of long-term loans or deferred payments, rather than a return to upfront fees.’
    • ‘Barbara Stickney, 52, landlady of The Phoenix Inn, George Street, said she was left without her bestselling Fosters Lager for two days when she was slightly late with an upfront payment.’
    • ‘The Icelandic airline that flew passengers for collapsed tour operator JetGreen secured a substantial upfront payment and security deposit from the firm.’
    • ‘There is a 3 per cent upfront brokerage fee in addition to an annual 1.5 per cent management charge.’
    • ‘The European deal should be worth a six-figure sum to the company, which will charge a small upfront fee and take a share of the revenue from every message sent by people playing the quiz game.’
    • ‘He was interested in an up front sum to cover his initial costs and then an ongoing royalty payment.’
    • ‘Some credit-card firms have started charging upfront fees to cardholders who wish to transfer balances from other cards.’
  • 3North American At the front or the most prominent position.

    ‘a literary weekly with an upfront section modeled on the New Yorker’
    • ‘As you navigate this week's issue, you'll see a new upfront section and expanded coverage of style, health and beauty and tech.’
    • ‘A long, black, steel gate positioned upfront served as the only entrance into the large, theater-looking edifice.’

Pronunciation

upfront

/ˌəpˈfrənt//ˌəpˈfrənt/