Definition of up-close in English:

up-close

adverb

  • At very close range.

    ‘he was able to experience glaciers calving up-close’
    • ‘The military successes in Grenada, Panama, and Desert Storm were not covered up-close and thus were viewed as good for the military and bad for the press.’
    • ‘These people have experienced alternative arrangements up-close.’
    • ‘I've never actually seen one up-close, but from what I've heard, the craftsmanship and finish of a Brioni overcoat is simply immaculate.’

adjective

  • Showing or allowing considerable detail.

    ‘an up-close look at a panorama of products and services’
    • ‘Holding the chain railing, we followed our leader and had up-close encounters with yellow tails, sergeant majors, blue tang, trumpet fish, and other reef dwellers.’
    • ‘Morris is also the host of Outdoor Investigations, a series that takes an up-close look at North American environmental issues and airs on the Outdoor Life Network.’
    • ‘The segments take viewers into the field and under the waves for an up-close look at the latest exploration and research into the oceans, seas, rivers, and lakes.’
    • ‘But in the process, Renz said, he got an up-close demonstration of how resistant lawmakers are to alter even slightly a policy that the voting public loves.’
    • ‘In a breathless press release the network promises ‘immediate, up-close reporting of the Democratic National Convention’.’
    • ‘If reporters wrote stories or took pictures of body recoveries, they would be reported and face consequences, he said, including a loss of access for up-close coverage of certain military operations.’
    • ‘Skiing, kayaking, surfing, biking - they all require you to very quickly switch focus from an up-close point to one much farther away.’
    • ‘They offer an up-close view of a life-size, red-blue-and-white clad young woman in an overgrown ravine before a chain-link fence.’
    • ‘Plus, with Father's Day right around the corner, tonight, we're getting an up-close look at some Hollywood dads through the eyes of their kids.’
    • ‘As the massive ground invasion moves forward, we will be blessed or cursed with an unprecedented up-close view of combat.’
    • ‘Jefferson maintains he wanted an up-close look at the devastation in his district and only accepted the offer of an escort when National Guard officials urged it upon him for safety reasons.’
    • ‘Lisa Rinzler's cinematography allows an up-close yet voyeuristic view of this awkward figure that everyone can, at one point of another, identify with.’
    • ‘New digital surveillance cameras provide remarkably clear pictures of your dining habits, and they have zoom lenses that can capture such up-close details as what you're writing on a check.’
    • ‘My first up-close and personal moments with alternating current started on the day I plugged in my slightly used, sky-blue, single-pickup Hohner electric guitar.’
    • ‘Exotic landscapes and cultural details enhance up-close encounters at such environments as the Asian Domain, the Australian Outback and the Louisiana Swamp.’
    • ‘Instead of the usual end-on productions in the large Hawk's Well auditorium, audiences will be able to see the productions up-close and in different performance styles.’
    • ‘The unprecedented convergence of up-close access to troops and new whiz-bang tools of the TV trade has turned many living rooms into domestic war theaters.’
    • ‘First, their book provides an up-close look at people who have deliberately and self-consciously chosen to go against conventional norms about work hours.’
    • ‘Romero sought a documentary feel to his narrative, using handheld cameras and up-close shots to bring the audience into this world gone awry.’
    • ‘Available in a variety of shapes and sizes, the see-through windows allow customers to get an up-close look at the product, to convey freshness and in some cases, flavor.’

Pronunciation

up-close

/ˌəpˈklōs/