Definition of unbridle in US English:

unbridle

verb

[with object]
  • 1Remove the bridle from (a horse or mule)

    ‘learn how to bridle and unbridle a horse’
    • ‘She felt the horse's anticipation, and decided to unbridle him early and let him run.’
    • ‘Going into the barn she unsaddled and unbridled the big stallion.’
    • ‘Our General, supposing everything perfectly safe, had ordered us to unbridle our horses and feed.’
    • ‘Nat disappeared from view as she unbridled her horse, quiet words murmuring in the air between them for a moment, too low for Cole to understand.’
    • ‘I didn't have to unsaddle or unbridle the horse or get its feed ready.’
    • ‘When an officer has made his patrole agreeably to the rules laid down, he may allow half of his party to go into the nearest peasants ' houses, unsaddle, unbridle, and feed half of the horses.’
    • ‘I ride back to the catch pens and unsaddle and unbridle Ms. Helena and turn her into one of the small pens where the green grass is ankle high.’
    • ‘Every horse will become defensive towards the bridle if you repeatedly hit his teeth with the bit, so be considerate when unbridling your horse.’
    1. 1.1 Release from restraint.
      as adjective ‘the forces of the world capitalist market were unbridled and spread quickly’
      • ‘Best is when he unbridles his voice, a smoked gospel cry that envelopes its listener.’
      • ‘Are you ready to unbridle your potential?’
      • ‘The Parliamentary majority owes its seats to a great extent to the unbridling of the jingo instinct.’
      • ‘The railwayman is a sailor on earth and in the small ports without a sea line - the forest towns - the train runs and runs, unbridling the natural world.’
      • ‘It feels like unbridling your mind and just finding your desire to learn again.’
      free, liberate, set free, release, let loose, let out, set loose, discharge
      View synonyms

Pronunciation

unbridle

/ˌənˈbrīdl//ˌənˈbraɪdl/