Definition of un-American in English:

un-American

adjective

  • 1Not in accordance with American characteristics.

    ‘such un-American concepts as subsidized medicine’
    • ‘We shall oppose for re-election all who in the white house or in congress betray American liberty in pursuit of un-American ends.’
    • ‘To oppose the drift of history is to invite a charge of treason, to be characterised as un-Australian, un-American or unpatriotic.’
    • ‘By doing so, these films attempted to redraw the line between American and un-American not along racial lines, as it was then being framed within the public debate, but rather along the lines of personal value judgments.’
    • ‘The problem is, American politics are un-American.’
    • ‘The audience for these un-American stories is becoming more and more American.’
    • ‘Though expressive of the secular modernist gospel, this is an un-American concept, with un-American consequences.’
    • ‘I thought it was kind of unusual that John Mellencamp after 21 albums would be labeled un-American after 21 albums of American songs.’
    • ‘I am also sure that many people will attack the fact that you are Puerto Rican, of course, they will say that you are un-American not realizing that Puerto Rico is an American commonwealth.’
    • ‘One of the interesting reactions to my work in jury nullification is that when I advocate selective nullification by African Americans is that it's somehow wrong because it's un-American.’
    • ‘He's the honorary American composer, never mind how genuinely un-American especially the quartet is.’
    • ‘Such wars are completely alien to the spirit of America held by most people, i.e., they're un-American.’
    • ‘New Orleans' embrace of suffering also makes it the most un-American of American cities.’
    • ‘It shows how deeply un-American America has become.’
    • ‘Harry's world is an un-American place (even after the American publisher has cleaned up the language).’
    • ‘All the timidity this engenders, all this watching your mouth has started to feel positively un-American.’
    • ‘My guest tonight says it is un-American in his view to deny these children American citizenship.’
    • ‘When the tumult died and the gold dust settled, in continuance of a trend that feels at once deeply American and deeply un-American, loners, outsiders, misfits, deviants and freaks ruled the day at the 2003 Sundance film festival.’
    • ‘But for all his un-American origins, there was one thing wholeheartedly American about Pulitzer.’
    • ‘However, eroding the basic civil rights of any Americans is simply un-American.’
    • ‘So, secondly, it's really un-American; it's a break with American values.’
    1. 1.1US historical Contrary to the interests of the US and therefore treasonable.
      • ‘The feeling is starting to bubble up elsewhere, too, among people who feel that what Darby did was unpatriotic, un-American, even faintly treasonous.’
      • ‘There was nothing aberrant about this, nothing outre or un-American; quite the contrary.’
      • ‘It goes against the values of the Constitution, the foundation on which our country was built, and is therefore un-American.’
      • ‘For a time, a time that is not entirely past, voicing dissent was viewed as treasonous or un-American.’
      • ‘Dissent is un-American and therefore justifiably punished by a fine.’

Pronunciation:

un-American

/ˌənəˈmerəkən/