Definition of typhoon in US English:

typhoon

noun

  • A tropical storm in the region of the Indian or western Pacific oceans.

    • ‘Summer brings warm winds from the South Pacific, and typhoons, especially to the southern regions of the country.’
    • ‘Hurricanes, tornadoes, typhoons, lightning storms, nothing was a match for what was experienced almost every night in our house.’
    • ‘In other parts of the world, the same types of storms are called typhoons or cyclones.’
    • ‘Hurricanes, typhoons and tornados are commonplace.’
    • ‘He complained that the community flooded every time a typhoon or tropical storm swept through Taoyuan.’
    • ‘Hurricanes, like their regional cousin a typhoon, both come from the family of tropical cyclones.’
    • ‘Other great winds like hurricanes, typhoons and cyclones, are essentially just high winds.’
    • ‘Kobayashi said last month's deadly earthquake in the central region of Niigata and typhoons that hit western provinces would have dampened the figures.’
    • ‘In the Pacific they are known as typhoons, in the Indian Ocean as cyclones.’
    • ‘The archives show names for typhoons in the western Pacific all of the way back to 1945.’
    • ‘Severe tropical cyclones correspond to the hurricanes or typhoons of other parts of the world.’
    • ‘Well, there have been strong hurricanes and cyclones and typhoons in other parts of the world this year.’
    • ‘It is the super-cells within the tropical cyclones, such as hurricanes or typhoons that produce very heavy downpours as these storms start to move inland.’
    • ‘You have a lot of coastal dwellers particularly in the north, where cyclones and even typhoons, hurricanes are a problem, and we warmer waters are going to generate more intense cyclones.’
    • ‘They include delays caused by storms, typhoons and snowfall.’
    • ‘The Far East, Australasia and the Indian Ocean have their fair share of typhoons and monsoons.’
    • ‘There has been an observed and recorded link between the sea surface temperature and the frequency and intensity of tropical storms, typhoons and hurricanes.’
    • ‘Records for heavy rain, flooding, hurricanes and typhoons as well as drought and dust storms are increasingly being broken.’
    • ‘Each year, the tropics are battered by up to 40 hurricanes, typhoons, and cyclones, while floods and landslides occur everywhere in numbers too great to keep track of.’
    • ‘Many lives in Pacific states have been spared from earthquakes, tsunamis, typhoons and hurricanes in the last 50 years or so thanks to the system.’
    cyclone, tropical storm, storm, tornado, hurricane, windstorm, whirlwind
    View synonyms

Origin

Late 16th century: partly via Portuguese from Arabic ṭūfān (perhaps from Greek tuphōn ‘whirlwind’); reinforced by Chinese dialect tai fung ‘big wind’.

Pronunciation

typhoon

/tīˈfo͞on//taɪˈfun/