Definition of two-hander in English:

two-hander

noun

  • 1A play for two actors.

    • ‘Lee Anne Oswald directed me in a two-hander and we performed it as part of Dundee's Women's Festival.’
    • ‘The star, a regular performer at York's Theatre Royal, sustained the injury while rehearsing the two-hander show yesterday, leading to cancellation of last night's performance.’
    • ‘A half-hour two-hander, Laundry at 4am is a small theatrical gem.’
    • ‘This was a bold aesthetic decision, as two-handers require a more exacting command of framing, camera moves, eye lines, shot duration and cutting points than films with larger casts.’
    • ‘Although the odd guest would visit, the episodes were virtually two-handers, crackling with dialogue so good that the players could scarcely suppress smiling as they delivered their lines.’
    • ‘As must be apparent, any show which is a two-hander depends on the abilities of its performers to keep the audience's interest, particularly if, to some, Sondheim is an acquired if not exotic taste.’
    • ‘The play is a two-hander comedy, first premiered in 1980 and filmed three years later, starring Michael Caine and Julie Walters.’
    • ‘The plays run for 80 minutes which is just about enough for the tension to be drawn out in a two-hander of limited narrative potential.’
    • ‘This new comedy written and directed by Glenda Stirling is a two-hander about a boy played by Kruchkywich and a girl played by Medina Hahn who meet, mate and run to the altar.’
    • ‘Essentially a two-hander, writer/director Patrick Stettner's debut is more of a stage play than a movie.’
    • ‘It's basically a two-hander, set in the backstage areas of theatres and focussing on the interaction between an up-and-coming young actor and a much older thesp on his uppers.’
    • ‘This is essentially a two-hander - with one additional male character thrown in to create a plot bender late in the movie - and two-handers are intricate and difficult things to make work.’
    • ‘It's a cheap two-hander which takes place in a studio and which makes use of contemporary techniques but which attempts to be both entertaining and illuminating both about the archaeological past of our medium and its dark future.’
    • ‘Slick, snappy and entertaining, this two-hander about the new phenomenon of speed-dating is a gem.’
    • ‘‘Also, unlike theatre, you don't have any two-hander operas,’ she adds.’
    • ‘‘I've only ever done two-handers at drama school [the Webber Douglas School in London] but this is even more intense because I don't leave the stage, apart from the interval,’ he says, in his trademark deadpan, chilled London accent.’
    • ‘Essentially a two-hander, he allows actors no physical contact and revokes his licence to shock.’
    • ‘The two-hander unfolds in a French formal garden, as the composer and the lady find themselves doing others’ bidding.’
    • ‘Perhaps ‘brilliant ‘is the wrong word for this 80-minute two-hander.’’
    • ‘One- and two-handers are becoming the order of the day on the local theatre scene.’
  • 2Tennis
    A shot taken with both hands on the racket.