Main definitions of twit in US English:

: twit1twit2twit3

twit1

nounPlural twits

British
informal
  • A silly or foolish person.

    • ‘The tragedy is that statisticians and pollsters take these pathetic twits seriously.’
    • ‘And these twits think that it's heresy to be in favour of the free market or against the UN.’
    • ‘Now most of them look like hippies gone wrong or aged twits clinging to their youth.’
    • ‘But some of her descendants behave unacceptably, like the worst kind of upper class twits.’
    • ‘He thought of them as the lowest of low in the class known as CTJN class, the ‘creeps, twits, jerks and nerds’ class.’
    • ‘In the good old days these guys would have been turned into a Monty Python skit about twits on parade.’
    • ‘Can you imagine seeing that familiar bunch of florid-faced twits gathering outside a rural bus operator's office to protest about the cut in regular services?’
    • ‘Both camps, according to White House insiders, are silly twits.’
    • ‘He seems to know his job rather more thoroughly than the dumb twits who've been along so far.’
    • ‘While I'd seen my fair share of mediocre upper middle-class twits leapfrog their contemporaries, I really believed that the results-driven media game was largely a meritocracy.’
    • ‘There is no way I could have watched those two twits - talk about strange bedfellows, by the way - without heaving a brick through the TV set.’
    • ‘I admit as well that I hate bureaucratically obsessed twits.’
    • ‘How can we, in Britain, refer to ourselves as a democracy, when we still allow a bunch of upper-class twits to rule the roost?’
    • ‘Now I've met enough pompous twits in my time to know one when I hear one.’
    • ‘I'm sure we can imagine the scene a hundred years on: ‘Yes, it used to be a nice old 16th century church but the insides were ripped out by some twits in 2004’.’
    • ‘The interviewer and the audience, if sincere, are twits.’
    • ‘These twits have had an unchallenged run in the media for far too long already.’
    • ‘None of these twits have done anything that they claimed they would do.’
    • ‘So, don't dismiss tennis as a sport for hot Russian babes and upper-class twits only.’
    • ‘Three days after the Prime Minister's petulant sneer that only reactionary twits claim education standards have fallen comes pretty devastating evidence that this is indeed the case.’
    fool, idiot, ass, halfwit, nincompoop, blockhead, buffoon, dunce, dolt, ignoramus, cretin, imbecile, dullard, moron, simpleton, clod
    View synonyms

Origin

1930s (earlier dialect, in the sense ‘talebearer’): perhaps from twit.

Pronunciation

twit

/twit//twɪt/

Main definitions of twit in US English:

: twit1twit2twit3

twit2

verbtwitted, twitting, twits

[with object]informal, dated
  • Tease or taunt (someone), especially in a good-humored way.

    • ‘A Rastafarian waving a flag twitted me as I pushed through the noisy crowd.’
    • ‘This was young Gene Siskel, twitting his rival, later partner-rival, Ebert.’
    • ‘Three cheers therefore for the man, who a day later in The Times skilfully twitted his ignorant colleague.’
    • ‘Before saying grace at the Seniors' annual dinner on Friday night, the priest twitted the new champion he'd played alongside earlier in the day.’
    • ‘I twitted Don gently because both Denise and Robert had some harsh words for him in their letters.’
    • ‘I like to twit my family somewhat, as this will show.’
    • ‘Later on, when NR twitted feminists for supporting a later president, Bill Clinton, I got a note from Dworkin pointing out that she didn't.’
    • ‘When he twits them, he does it gently, affectionately.’
    • ‘This happens through their own interactions, and observing each other in interchanges with others - as at a tea stall, when the pair are twitted by their young co-passengers and forced to cook up stories of their honeymoon.’
    • ‘And I've never before seen an Elektra show a sense of humor - her giddy twitting and teasing of Aegisth as she leads him to his bloody doom is positively hilarious.’
    • ‘Annoyance with prevailing trendy social morality can provide some basis too, not to mention some pleasure at twitting what is seen as a ‘politically correct’ liberal establishment.’
    • ‘At least the gatherings gave you a chance to twit tame Jesuits about how you didn't believe in their God, but aren't-we-all-good-fellows-anyway.’

Origin

Old English ætwītan ‘reproach with’, from æt ‘at’ + wītan ‘to blame’.

Pronunciation

twit

/twit//twɪt/

Main definitions of twit in US English:

: twit1twit2twit3

twit3

nounPlural twits

informal
  • A state of agitation or nervous excitement.

    ‘we're in a twit about your visit’

Origin

Probably from twitter.

Pronunciation

twit

/twit//twɪt/