Definition of twang in US English:

twang

noun

  • 1A strong ringing sound such as that made by the plucked string of a musical instrument or a released bowstring.

    • ‘The twang of a guitar string resounded periodically, but never a song.’
    • ‘A ringing twang interrupted the scene as a large piece of shrapnel ricocheted off a 500-pounder in the bomb bay, causing me to momentarily slam the door shut.’
    • ‘Arlan chuckled, but then stiffened as he heard the twang of a bowstring, and he ducked, jerking Cora down with him.’
    • ‘With the gentle twang of the lutes, the lively melody started.’
    • ‘Sure enough, the echoing twang of a bowstring sounded.’
    • ‘Then, there was the soft twang of the string being let go, and she rolled over into her horse's hind legs, once again barely being missed by an arrow.’
    • ‘It is replaced by the soft rustle of saris, the smells of incense and saffron, and the Eastern twang of sitars.’
    • ‘Or was it instantaneous, with the twang of Cupid's bow string, and - poof!’
    • ‘Suddenly the twang of a bowstring rang out and the cloak fell to the floor.’
    • ‘As they paddle, they hear the twang of bowstrings and arrows begin to fall around them.’
    • ‘Thinking of a satisfying bass guitar sound, a twang which makes the room vibrate but doesn't go through the ears at all.’
    • ‘Jeremy followed, dropping onto the elevator as Andy sat down to slide his legs down through the open hatch, and the groaning sound became a sharp twang.’
    • ‘He sighted his target, and released the string with a twang.’
    • ‘‘Hello, Joel,’ he heard her say as the ball bounced off the metal rim with a twang.’
    • ‘I heard the twang of guitar strings, and a little melody ensued.’
    • ‘The bushes rustled sharply, there were five twangs in unison and five arrows shot out of nowhere and flew at him.’
    • ‘Suddenly she heard, amidst all the noise, the twang of a bow.’
    • ‘As he exhaled, Erik let his arrow fly with a sharp twang of the string, the sound echoed thirty times over as the rest of the cadets fired.’
    • ‘He threw himself onto the ground as the meadow was filled with the twang of many bowstrings.’
    • ‘Celil was suddenly thrust back into reality from her daydream by the bellow of a war-horn, screeches and roars, and the twang of bowstrings.’
    1. 1.1 A nasal or other distinctive manner of pronunciation or intonation characteristic of the speech of an individual, area, or country.
      ‘an American twang’
      • ‘The Japanese, Portuguese, French, and even the occasional twang of a North American accent suddenly sounded divine.’
      • ‘‘Please,’ interrupted the judge, kindly and old, a Southern twang in his voice.’
      • ‘The distinct nasal twang of an ‘American’ accent echoes thought the plane.’
      • ‘The accents may be English, albeit with a twang, but the influences are Australian.’
      • ‘Everywhere you go, especially in the U.K., you will hear the twang of the American accent, and it will make you cringe because you didn't realize that your own voice sounded so nasal.’
      • ‘Despite his training from speech therapists, a slight twang escaped Cutler's lips on that final word.’
      • ‘His speech was so heavy with the flat twang of the Danes that it was hard to understand.’
      • ‘They fear their distinct twang, nonstandard grammar, and obscure idioms will cause potential employers to conclude they are incapable of holding jobs.’
      • ‘He's got a southern twang to his voice that disarms his listeners.’
      • ‘‘Over the busy Christmas period you can go up or down and we've gone up which is great,’ says Maybury in an accent that is mostly Irish but with an odd twang of Yorkshire.’
      • ‘She gestures to your bags, her American twang uncomfortably loud in the small area.’
      • ‘So what's happening to the music once defined by the twang and heartache of Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, and Patsy Cline?’
      • ‘The distinctive twang that has been heard in Bolton for centuries is in danger of being swallowed up by a general Northern accent, language experts claims.’
      • ‘He always accentuated his northern twang when he was up from university.’
      • ‘She's from Texas, and the words roll off her tongue with a distinctive elastic twang, softened by the years in New York.’
      • ‘‘Beaucoup de vent’ sounds more like ‘beaucoup du vin’ and the twang gets more nasal the further south you go.’
      • ‘Even in the simple word ‘hello,’ I could hear the soft twang of her accent.’
      • ‘Not everyone in Ohio speaks with the midwestern nasal twang.’
      • ‘There is a laconic drawl, an ever so slight nasal twang to his voice.’
      • ‘I added my American twang to the symphony of accents, and we whiled away a cheerful half hour in front of the TV.’
      pronunciation, intonation, enunciation, elocution, articulation, inflection, tone, modulation, cadence, timbre, utterance, manner of speaking, speech pattern, speech, diction, delivery
      View synonyms

verb

  • 1Make or cause to make a twang.

    no object ‘a spring twanged beneath him’
    with object ‘some old men were twanging banjos’
    • ‘They were too late, and bows twanged as arrows whistled through the air.’
    • ‘A few bullets twanged off of the dusty corner of a building a few paces behind her, and she sped up a little, taking another turn, and another, hoping to lose their trail.’
    • ‘Bowstrings twanged and rifles cracked as the volley flew into the army.’
    • ‘He's sent through by Totti and, with only Perez to beat, allows the ball to twang off not one but two of his shins, allowing the keeper to clear for a corner.’
    • ‘The string twanged as the arrow flew, striking the snow dragon in the eye.’
    • ‘You could almost hear the good vibrations twanging in the air.’
    • ‘After a moment of tense silence, the bowstring twanged.’
    • ‘At the same instant, before the boy could act, a hundred other bows twanged from all around the house.’
    • ‘Swirling to one side as the other's blade twanged against the rock wall, each watched closely for an opening in the other's defense.’
    • ‘Following suit, the followers of Melhiril charged as well, swords swinging wildly, bows twanging, and the clashing of swords and shields.’
    • ‘He still hadn't put his sheets on it, and the mattress twanged under his weight.’
    • ‘The bell above the door in the café twanged, and two figures walked in.’
    • ‘The choking, glugging boiling water twanged against the hollow unplumbed tub and the brass bungle of piping smeared and juddered.’
    • ‘She threw the knife into the thick carpet, the point of which stuck and twanged silently as Fearne's mother ran upstairs, screamed and called an ambulance.’
    • ‘The bed springs twanged and the wooden floor boards responded with a creak.’
    • ‘Screams echoed out as the branches twanged back, severely impairing the vision of many runners.’
    • ‘She ran into the harp, and it twanged in protest.’
    • ‘She stubbed her toe and managed to release the guitar from its holding and it twanged on the ground, waking the two very unstable-temperamental parents below.’
    • ‘The arrow dropped to the ground next to him, the bowstring twanging up in Cinaed's face, causing the swordsman-in-training to drop the weapon and stumble back, cursing vividly.’
    • ‘The arrow vibrated in the tree trunk, twanging, and in the sudden silence of the forest around them, Kieran could hear the sound of riders closing the distance.’
    strum, pick, thrum, plunk, finger
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1with object Utter (something) with a nasal twang.
      ‘the announcer was twanging out all the details’
      • ‘Just because you sing with the odd hiccup or twang a certain phrase doesn't mean you can say you're singing country music.’

Origin

Mid 16th century: imitative.

Pronunciation

twang

/twæŋ//twaNG/