Definition of Tuscarora in English:



  • 1An American Indian people forming part of the Six Nations, originally inhabiting the Carolinas and later New York.

    • ‘After 1711 the Carolinas were embroiled in war, first with the Tuscarora, then with the Yamasee.’
    • ‘The Cherokee people or the Aniyunwiya, as we call ourselves, and the Tuscarora, who are also Iroquois people, migrated south.’
    • ‘The Tuscaroras were fleeing north from war in the Carolinas in 1722.’
    • ‘Early in the eighteenth century the Tuscarora, another Iroquoian-speaking tribe living in North Carolina, moved into the territory occupied by the Confederacy.’
    • ‘Following the Revolutionary War, the Tuscaroras acquired land for their own reservation near the present day Lewiston, New York.’
    • ‘Civilization also means a respect for old vows: the Five Nations maintain their alliance with the Tuscarora despite one thousand years of separation.’
    • ‘During this period, the Tuscaroras were admitted as a sixth constituent nation.’
    • ‘Then Olbrechts spent three months in 1928 among the Tuscarora, and in 1929 he was for a brief time with the Onondaga.’
  • 2The Iroquoian language of the Tuscarora.

    • ‘The Cherokee language belongs to the Iroquoian family of languages and is therefore related to Mohawk, Seneca, Onondaga, Oneida, Cayuga, and Tuscarora, among others.’
    • ‘Everyone started calling him MGM, which eventually evolved into Gihh-rhaggs, the Tuscarora word for lion.’


  • Relating to the Tuscarora or their language.

    • ‘It led the Five Nations to invite Tuscarora refugees to enter the Longhouse.’
    • ‘Ted Williams is a writer, an artist, and an elder from the Tuscarora tribe in the Iroquois nation in New York State.’
    • ‘Cusick's silence regarding the heterogeneity of his Iroquois audience-and-referent also fills the space between Five Nations and Tuscarora identity.’


From an Iroquois name, perhaps from Catawba (a Siouan language spoken in South Carolina) taskarudē.