Definition of tug in English:

tug

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • Pull (something) hard or suddenly.

    ‘she tugged off her boots’
    [no object] ‘he tugged at Tom's coat sleeve’
    • ‘He murmured, gently tugging my arm and pulling me into his lap.’
    • ‘Max looked abruptly away and down, as if a small boy had suddenly tugged at his sleeve.’
    • ‘I hold it tightly as I step out, pulling the lever for the passenger seat and tug it forward.’
    • ‘She tugged at Rob's sleeve with just enough force to suggest that she would tug much harder if he did not comply with her wishes.’
    • ‘The old man grabbed hold of it and tugged it from its confinement, dragging it out into the driveway.’
    • ‘She let out a strangled cry when he grabbed a handful of her hair and tugged her head back.’
    • ‘He pulled a strap across her arms, tugged it tight and buckled it.’
    • ‘She scrambled to her feet, but a hand clutched around her ankle, tugging her back.’
    • ‘Soon Dougal turned over pulling the covers with him and she tugged them back over her.’
    • ‘Slowly and steadily I reel it in, remembering Glyn's advice not to tug the hook too suddenly.’
    • ‘As he traipsed off tugging his shirt, he looked a little unhappy.’
    • ‘I pulled as hard as I could, tugging his arm, trying to get him back up to the forest floor.’
    • ‘Rachael screamed, throwing herself down next to me and grabbing my arm, tugging it.’
    • ‘It stuck like glue and no matter how hard he tugged it, it just wouldn't budge.’
    • ‘Jan grabs her braid and tugs it, ignoring her startled outcry.’
    • ‘She tugs Mike's arm, pulling him down into an awkward kneel.’
    • ‘I was going to throw away the thick wad of paper he gave me when Terry suddenly tugged at my arm.’
    • ‘Cyril reached for his boots and tugged them on, and then pulled a shirt over his head.’
    • ‘On the field, they tug their opponents' shirts and fall over like skittles at the slightest contact.’
    • ‘A yellow school bus pulled in front of us and Sera tugged my arm and James just followed us.’
    drag, pull, draw, haul, heave, tow, trail
    pull, pluck
    View synonyms

noun

  • 1A hard or sudden pull.

    ‘another tug and it came loose’
    figurative ‘an overwhelming tug of attraction’
    • ‘There was a hard tug and then it steadied out and I began to descend.’
    • ‘Then he felt a sudden tug and the pad was wrenched from his grasp.’
    • ‘Reaching for the door handle, he grabbed it and gave it a hard tug.’
    • ‘Before I knew what was going on, I felt a tug and was pulled into a warm embrace.’
    • ‘About 5 minutes later I felt a hard tug, and started reeling in the fish.’
    • ‘Unable to get it out with a simple tug, he pulled one of the two pistols out of his holster.’
    • ‘Fiona gave the cloth a good, hard tug and stepped back, dusting her hands together.’
    • ‘In frustration, she gave her hardest tug to yank the arrow out.’
    • ‘I felt a small tug pull my robe; I turned to face a small child, staring up at me.’
    • ‘I took the edge of the blanket and gave it a hard tug pulling the whole thing off the bed.’
    • ‘Tucking the end of the sash between my thumb and the palm of my hand, I gave a hard tug, undoing the knot.’
    • ‘There was a sudden tug and then a rush of light and then he was out.’
    • ‘We carried on running and a minute later I felt a hard tug on my arm.’
    • ‘He began drawing a detailed picture of an angel when a sudden tug on his shoulders nearly made him fall off the bench.’
    • ‘She woke up the next morning to feel a hard tug on her arm.’
    • ‘Still holding the mast, Sydney grabbed at the bag, managing to rip it down after two hard tugs.’
    • ‘There was a sudden tug, and the cloak around his shoulders was torn away.’
    • ‘I felt a sudden tug on the stick and a horrible cracking sound.’
    • ‘He was frightened by her hard tug and the weight of his armor made him clatter to the floor.’
    • ‘You give your ropes a tug and pull all the other man's pegs out.’
    pull, jerk, wrench, heave
    yank
    View synonyms
  • 2

    short for tugboat
    • ‘The bridge swings open so massive cruise ships and small tugboats can enter the harbor.’
    • ‘Many parked their cars along River Road and either set up chairs or stood and watched as a tugboat nudged the ship into place.’
    • ‘‘The nearest boat to the tugboat was 40 nautical miles away and we managed to be there in about two hours,’ he said.’
    • ‘Yesterday morning, three tugs pulled the 3,000-tonne vessel off the top of the wreck.’
    • ‘Smaller boats, including tugboats can also be seen moving about on the river.’
    1. 2.1 An aircraft towing a glider.
      • ‘Portability as well as being able to be flown from hang gliding flight parks using hang glider tugs has been the criteria for design.’
      • ‘There is an open question as to what the legal status of these operations would be after the exemption expires and our towing operations that use heavy tugs move to light-sport aircraft.’
      • ‘By 1960, only seven remained active as target tugs and radar calibration aircraft for the gunnery ranges ashore or the fleet guns.’
      • ‘The hangar is already filling up with tugs and gliders.’
      • ‘It saw active service as a troop transport, glider tug, freighter, ferry aircraft, and ambulance, and was used for dropping parachute troops.’
  • 3A loop from a horse's saddle that supports a shaft or trace.

    • ‘Most folks hang their shafts too low and you need to restrain the tug so it doesn't fly forward and backward as the animal performs maneuvers.’
    • ‘The tug straps loop through the gullet of the saddle and then buckle back to the collar.’

Origin

Middle English: from the base of tow. The noun is first recorded ( late Middle English) in tug.

Pronunciation

tug

/təɡ/